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National League pennant winners 1901-68

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Title: National League pennant winners 1901-68  
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Subject: Willie Mays, Wilbert Robinson, Red Schoendienst, Stuffy McInnis, Heinie Groh, List of Houston Astros seasons, List of St. Louis Cardinals seasons, 1955 Brooklyn Dodgers season, Slim Sallee, 1968 St. Louis Cardinals season
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National League pennant winners 1901-68

Each season in Major League Baseball, the National League team with the best performance wins the league's pennant, signifying that they are its champion and winning the right to play in the World Series. In addition to the pennant, the team that wins the National League playoffs receives the Warren C. Giles Trophy,[1] named after Warren Giles, who was the league president from 1951 to 1969. Warren's son Bill Giles, the honorary league president and owner of the Philadelphia Phillies, presents the trophy to the National League champion at the conclusion of each National League Championship Series (NLCS).[1] Early in the history of the National League, the pennant was presented to the team with the best win–loss record at the end of the season.[2] The first modern World Series was played in 1903, and after a hiatus in 1904, continued until 1994,[3] when a players' strike forced the cancellation of the postseason,[4] and resumed in 1995.[3] The current National League pennant winners are the St. Louis Cardinals, who won the right to play in the 2013 World Series on October 23, 2013.

In 1969, the league split into two divisions,[5] and the teams with the best records in each division played one another in the NLCS to determine the pennant winner. The format of the NLCS was changed from a best-of-five to a best-of-seven format for the 1985 postseason.[6] In 1995, an additional playoff series was added when Major League Baseball restructured the two divisions in each league into three.[7] As of 2010, the winners of the Eastern, Central, and Western Divisions, as well as one wild card team, play in the National League Division Series, a best-of-five playoff to determine the opponents who will play for the pennant.[8]

The Los Angeles Dodgers (formerly the Brooklyn Dodgers; 21 National League pennants, 27 playoff appearances).[9] are the most winning team in the National League. The San Francisco Giants (formerly the New York Giants of Manhattan; 22 pennants, 24 playoff appearances)[10] are in second place. In third place is the St. Louis Cardinals (19 pennants and 27 playoff appearances),[11] followed by the Atlanta Braves (17 pennants and 22 postseason appearances between their three home cities of Atlanta, Milwaukee, and Boston)[12] and the Chicago Cubs (16 pennants and 16 playoff appearances).[13] The Philadelphia Phillies won the league in back-to-back seasons in 2008 and 2009, becoming the first National League team to do so since the Braves in 1995 and 1996.[14]It should be noted that before 1903 there was no World Series as we know it today because the leagues were only loosely affiliated. While the Dodgers have 22 pennants they only have 18 World Series appearances. The San Francisco Giants and Saint Louis Cardinals are tied for the most World Series appearances by a National League team with 19.(Including the NL Pennant won by the 2013 Cardinals)

The team with the best record to win the National League pennant was the 1906 Cubs, who won 116 of 152 games during that season[15] and finished 20 games ahead of the Giants, playing in New York at the time.[16] The best record by a pennant-winner in the Championship Series era is 108–54, which was achieved by the Cincinnati Reds in 1975[17] and the New York Mets in 1986;[18] both of these teams went on to win the World Series.[3]

National League champions have gone on to win the World Series 46 times, most recently in 2012.[3] Pennant-winners have also won the Temple Cup and the Chronicle-Telegraph Cup, two pre–World Series league championships, although second-place teams won three of the four Temple Cup meetings.[19][20] The largest margin of victory for a pennant-winner before 1969 is 27 12 games; the Pittsburgh Pirates led the Brooklyn Superbas (now the Dodgers) by that margin on the final day of the 1902 season.[21]

Key

Year Links to the corresponding "year in baseball" (1876–1900) or "Major League Baseball season" (1901–present) article
Team Links to the corresponding season in which each team played
Series Links to the corresponding "National League Championship Series" article
Record Regular season win–loss record
GA Games ahead of the second-place team (pre-NLCS era)
WW Wins by the winning team (NLCS era)
LW Wins by the losing team (NLCS era)
Ref Reference
T Won Temple Cup (1894–1897)
C-T Won Chronicle-Telegraph Cup (1900)
* Won World Series (modern era only; 1903–present)
E National League East division member (1969–present)
C National League Central division member (1995–present)
W National League West division member (1969–present)
Wild card team (1995–present)

1876–1968


Year Team Record GA Ahead of Ref
1876 Chicago White Stockings 52–14 6 Hartford Dark Blues [23]
1877 Boston Red Caps 42–18 7 Louisville Grays [24]
1878 Boston Red Caps 41–19 4 Cincinnati Reds [25]
1879 Providence Grays 59–25 5 Boston Red Caps [26]
1880 Chicago White Stockings 67–17 15 Providence Grays [27]
1881 Chicago White Stockings 56–28 9 Providence Grays [28]
1882 Chicago White Stockings 55–29 3 Providence Grays [29]
1883 Boston Beaneaters 63–35 4 Chicago White Stockings [30]
1884 Providence Grays 84–28 10½ Boston Beaneaters [31]
1885 Chicago White Stockings 87–25 2 New York Giants [32]
1886 Chicago White Stockings 90–34 Detroit Wolverines [33]
1887 Detroit Wolverines 79–45 Philadelphia Phillies [34]
1888 New York Giants 84–47 9 Chicago White Stockings [35]
1889 New York Giants 83–43 1 Boston Beaneaters [36]
1890 Brooklyn Bridegrooms 86–43 Chicago Colts [37]
1891 Boston Beaneaters 87–51 Chicago Colts [38]
1892 Boston Beaneaters 102–48 Cleveland Spiders [39]
1893 Boston Beaneaters 86–43 5 Pittsburgh Pirates [40]
1894 Baltimore Orioles 89–39 3 New York GiantsT [41]
1895 Baltimore Orioles 87–43 3 Cleveland SpidersT [42]
1896 Baltimore OriolesT 90–39 Cleveland Spiders [43]
1897 Boston Beaneaters 93–39 2 Baltimore OriolesT [44]
1898 Boston Beaneaters 102–47 6 Baltimore Orioles [45]
1899 Brooklyn Superbas 101–47 8 Boston Beaneaters [46]
1900 Brooklyn SuperbasC-T 82–54 Pittsburgh Pirates [47]
1901 Pittsburgh Pirates 90–49 Philadelphia Phillies [48]
1902 Pittsburgh Pirates 103–36 27½ Brooklyn Superbas [49]
1903 Pittsburgh Pirates 91–49 New York Giants [50]
1904 New York Giants 106–47 13 Chicago Cubs [51]
1905 New York Giants* 106–47 9 Pittsburgh Pirates [52]
1906 Chicago Cubs 116–36 20 New York Giants [53]
1907 Chicago Cubs* 107–45 17 Pittsburgh Pirates [54]
1908 Chicago Cubs* 99–55 1 Pittsburgh Pirates [55]
1909 Pittsburgh Pirates* 110–42 Chicago Cubs [56]
1910 Chicago Cubs 104–50 13 New York Giants [57]
1911 New York Giants 99–54 Chicago Cubs [58]
1912 New York Giants 103–48 10 Pittsburgh Pirates [59]
1913 New York Giants 101–51 12½ Philadelphia Phillies [60]
1914 Boston Braves* 94–59 10½ New York Giants [61]
1915 Philadelphia Phillies 90–62 7 Boston Braves [62]
1916 Brooklyn Robins 94–60 Philadelphia Phillies [63]
1917 New York Giants 98–56 10 Philadelphia Phillies [64]
1918 Chicago Cubs 84–45 10½ New York Giants [65]
1919 Cincinnati Reds* 96–44 9 New York Giants [66]
1920 Brooklyn Robins 93–61 7 New York Giants [67]
1921 New York Giants* 94–59 4 Pittsburgh Pirates [68]
1922 New York Giants* 93–61 7 Cincinnati Reds [69]
1923 New York Giants 95–58 Cincinnati Reds [70]
1924 New York Giants 93–60 Brooklyn Robins [71]
1925 Pittsburgh Pirates* 95–58 New York Giants [72]
1926 St. Louis Cardinals* 89–65 2 Cincinnati Reds [73]
1927 Pittsburgh Pirates 94–60 St. Louis Cardinals [74]
1928 St. Louis Cardinals 95–59 2 New York Giants [75]
1929 Chicago Cubs 98–54 2 Pittsburgh Pirates [76]
1930 St. Louis Cardinals 92–62 2 Chicago Cubs [77]
1931 St. Louis Cardinals* 101–53 13 New York Giants [78]
1932 Chicago Cubs 90–64 4 Pittsburgh Pirates [79]
1933 New York Giants* 91–61 5 Pittsburgh Pirates [80]
1934 St. Louis Cardinals* 95–58 2 New York Giants [81]
1935 Chicago Cubs 100–54 4 St. Louis Cardinals [82]
1936 New York Giants 92–62 5 St. Louis Cardinals [83]
1937 New York Giants 95–57 3 Chicago Cubs [84]
1938 Chicago Cubs 89–63 2 Pittsburgh Pirates [85]
1939 Cincinnati Reds 97–57 St. Louis Cardinals [86]
1940 Cincinnati Reds* 100–53 12 Brooklyn Dodgers [87]
1941 Brooklyn Dodgers 100–54 St. Louis Cardinals [88]
1942 St. Louis Cardinals* 106–48 2 Brooklyn Dodgers [89]
1943 St. Louis Cardinals 105–49 18 Cincinnati Reds [90]
1944 St. Louis Cardinals* 105–49 14½ Pittsburgh Pirates [91]
1945 Chicago Cubs 98–56 3 St. Louis Cardinals [92]
1946 St. Louis Cardinals* 98–58 2 Brooklyn Dodgers [93]
1947 Brooklyn Dodgers 94–60 5 St. Louis Cardinals [94]
1948 Boston Braves 91–62 St. Louis Cardinals [95]
1949 Brooklyn Dodgers 97–57 1 St. Louis Cardinals [96]
1950 Philadelphia Phillies 91–63 2 Brooklyn Dodgers [97]
1951 New York Giants 98–59 1 Brooklyn Dodgers [98]
1952 Brooklyn Dodgers 96–57 New York Giants [99]
1953 Brooklyn Dodgers 105–49 13 Milwaukee Braves [100]
1954 New York Giants* 97–57 5 Brooklyn Dodgers [101]
1955 Brooklyn Dodgers* 98–55 13½ Milwaukee Braves [102]
1956 Brooklyn Dodgers 93–61 1 Milwaukee Braves [103]
1957 Milwaukee Braves* 95–59 8 St. Louis Cardinals [104]
1958 Milwaukee Braves 92–62 8 Pittsburgh Pirates [105]
1959 Los Angeles Dodgers* 88–68 2 Milwaukee Braves [106]
1960 Pittsburgh Pirates* 95–59 7 Milwaukee Braves [107]
1961 Cincinnati Reds 93–61 4 Los Angeles Dodgers [108]
1962 San Francisco Giants 103–62 1 Los Angeles Dodgers [109]
1963 Los Angeles Dodgers* 99–63 6 St. Louis Cardinals [110]
1964 St. Louis Cardinals* 93–69 1 Philadelphia Phillies [111]
1965 Los Angeles Dodgers* 97–65 2 San Francisco Giants [112]
1966 Los Angeles Dodgers 95–67 San Francisco Giants [113]
1967 St. Louis Cardinals* 101–60 10½ San Francisco Giants [114]
1968 St. Louis Cardinals 97–65 9 San Francisco Giants [115]

Championship Series era (1969–present)


Year Series Winning team Record WW LW Losing team Record Ref
1969 1969 New York MetsE* 100–62 3 0 Atlanta BravesW 93–69 [116]
1970 1970 Cincinnati RedsW 102–60 3 0 Pittsburgh PiratesE 87–63 [117]
1971 1971 Pittsburgh PiratesE* 97–65 3 1 San Francisco GiantsW 90–72 [118]
1972 1972 Cincinnati RedsW 95–59 3 2 Pittsburgh PiratesE 96–59 [119]
1973 1973 New York MetsE 82–79 3 2 Cincinnati RedsW 99–63 [120]
1974 1974 Los Angeles DodgersW 102–60 3 1 Pittsburgh PiratesE 88–74 [121]
1975 1975 Cincinnati RedsW* 108–54 3 0 Pittsburgh PiratesE 92–69 [122]
1976 1976 Cincinnati RedsW* 102–60 3 0 Philadelphia PhilliesE 101–61 [123]
1977 1977 Los Angeles DodgersW 98–64 3 1 Philadelphia PhilliesE 101–61 [124]
1978 1978 Los Angeles DodgersW 95–67 3 1 Philadelphia PhilliesE 90–72 [125]
1979 1979 Pittsburgh PiratesE* 98–64 3 0 Cincinnati RedsW 90–71 [126]
1980 1980 Philadelphia PhilliesE* 91–71 3 2 Houston AstrosW 93–70 [127]
1981[a] 1981 Los Angeles DodgersW* 63–47 3 2 Montréal ExposE 60–48 [128]
1982 1982 St. Louis CardinalsE* 92–70 3 0 Atlanta BravesW 89–73 [129]
1983 1983 Philadelphia PhilliesE 90–72 3 1 Los Angeles DodgersW 91–71 [130]
1984 1984 San Diego PadresW 92–70 3 2 Chicago CubsE 96–65 [131]
1985 1985 St. Louis CardinalsE 101–61 4 2 Los Angeles DodgersW 95–67 [132]
1986 1986 New York MetsE* 108–54 4 2 Houston AstrosW 96–66 [133]
1987 1987 St. Louis CardinalsE 95–67 4 3 San Francisco Giants 90–72 [134]
1988 1988 Los Angeles DodgersW* 94–67 4 3 New York MetsE 100–60 [135]
1989 1989 San Francisco GiantsW 93–69 4 1 Chicago CubsE 92–70 [136]
1990 1990 Cincinnati RedsW* 91–71 4 2 Pittsburgh PiratesE 95–67 [137]
1991 1991 Atlanta BravesW 94–68 4 3 Pittsburgh PiratesE 98–64 [138]
1992 1992 Atlanta BravesW 98–64 4 3 Pittsburgh PiratesE 96–66 [139]
1993 1993 Philadelphia PhilliesE 97–65 4 2 Atlanta BravesW 104–58 [140]
1994 Not held due to players' strike. [141]
1995[b] 1995 Atlanta BravesE* 90–54 4 0 Cincinnati RedsC 85–59 [142]
1996 1996 Atlanta BravesE 96–66 4 3 St. Louis CardinalsC 88–74 [143]
1997 1997 Florida MarlinsE* 92–70 4 2 Atlanta BravesE 101–61 [144]
1998 1998 San Diego PadresW 98–64 4 2 Atlanta BravesE 106–56 [145]
1999 1999 Atlanta BravesE 103–59 4 2 New York MetsE† 97–66 [146]
2000 2000 New York MetsE 94–68 4 1 St. Louis CardinalsC 95–67 [147]
2001 2001 Arizona DiamondbacksW* 92–70 4 1 Atlanta BravesE 88–74 [148]
2002 2002 San Francisco GiantsW† 95–66 4 1 St. Louis CardinalsC 97–65 [149]
2003 2003 Florida MarlinsE* 91–71 4 3 Chicago CubsC 88–74 [150]
2004 2004 St. Louis CardinalsC 105–57 4 3 Houston AstrosC 92–70 [151]
2005 2005 Houston AstrosC† 89–73 4 2 St. Louis CardinalsC 100–62 [152]
2006 2006 St. Louis CardinalsC* 83–78 4 3 New York MetsE 97–65 [153]
2007 2007 Colorado RockiesW† 90–73 4 0 Arizona DiamondbacksW 90–72 [154]
2008 2008 Philadelphia PhilliesE* 92–70 4 1 Los Angeles DodgersW 84–78 [155]
2009 2009 Philadelphia PhilliesE 93–69 4 1 Los Angeles DodgersW 95–67 [156]
2010 2010 San Francisco GiantsW* 92–70 4 2 Philadelphia PhilliesE 97–65 [157]
2011 2011 St. Louis CardinalsC* 90–72 4 2 Milwaukee BrewersC 96–66 [158]
2012 2012 San Francisco GiantsW 94–68 4 3 St. Louis CardinalsC 88–74 [159]
2013 2013 St. Louis CardinalsC 97–65 4 2 Los Angeles DodgersW 92–70 [160]

Notes

  • a A mid-season labor stoppage split the season into two halves. The winner of the first half played the winner of the second half in each division in the 1981 National League Division Series. The winners played in the 1981 NLCS for the National League pennant.[128]
  • b The leagues were re-aligned in 1994 to three divisions and a wild card was added to the playoffs, but the labor stoppage cancelled the postseason. Wild cards were first used in the 1995 playoffs.[7]

NL pennants won by franchise


Italics represent a franchise that is defunct in Major League Baseball as of the 2012 season.
Team Pennants won Playoff appearances Ref
Los Angeles Dodgers[a] 21 27 [9]
San Francisco Giants[b] 22 24 [10]
St. Louis Cardinals[c] 19 27 [11]
Atlanta Braves[d] 17 31 [12]
Chicago Cubs[e] 16 22 [13]
Cincinnati Reds[f] 9 15 [161]
Pittsburgh Pirates[g] 9 17 [162]
Philadelphia Phillies[h] 7 13 [163]
New York Mets 4 7 [164]
Baltimore Orioles (NL)[l] 3 0 [165]
San Diego Padres 2 5 [166]
Miami Marlins 2 2 [167]
Providence Grays 2 0 [168]
Houston Astros[i] 1 9 [169]
Arizona Diamondbacks 1 5 [170]
Colorado Rockies 1 3 [171]
Detroit Wolverines 1 0 [172]
Milwaukee Brewers[j] 0 2 [173]
Washington Nationals[k] 0 2 [174]

Notes

  • a Also known as Brooklyn Dodgers, Brooklyn Robins, Brooklyn Superbas, Brooklyn Bridegrooms, Brooklyn Grooms, Brooklyn Grays and Brooklyn Atlantics. Does not include American Association pennant won in 1889[9]
  • b Also known as New York Giants and New York Gothams[10]
  • c Also known as St. Louis Perfectos, St. Louis Browns, and St. Louis Brown Stockings. Does not include American Associate pennants won in 1885-1888[11]
  • d Also known as Milwaukee Braves, Boston Braves, Boston Bees, Boston Rustlers, Boston Doves, Boston Beaneaters and Boston Red Caps[12]
  • e Also known as Chicago Orphans, Chicago Colts and Chicago White Stockings[13]
  • f Also known as Cincinnati Redlegs and Cincinnati Red Stockings[161]
  • g Also known as Pittsburg Alleghenys[162]
  • h Also known as Philadelphia Quakers and unofficially as Philadelphia Blue Jays[163]
  • i Also known as Houston Colt .45s[169]
  • j The Brewers were members of the American League through the 1997 season after which they switched to the National League.[175] This table records only the Brewers' National League accomplishments.
  • k Also known as Montréal Expos[174]
  • l The 19th-century Baltimore Orioles who played in the National League are no longer in existence; two current American League franchises later used the Orioles name (New York Yankees and Baltimore Orioles).[176]

See also

Baseball portal

References

General
Inline citations

External links

  • Major League Baseball

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