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Power forward (basketball)

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Power forward (basketball)

Tim Duncan, a power forward, warming up before a game in February 12, 2011

Power forward (PF) is a position in the sport of basketball. The position is referred to in playbook terms as the four position and is commonly abbreviated "PF". It has also been referred to as the "post" position. Power forwards play a role similar to that of center (basketball) in what is called the "post" or "low blocks". They typically play offensively with their backs towards the basket and position themselves defensively under the basket in a zone defense or against the opposing power forward in man-to-man defense. The power forward position entails a variety of responsibilities, one of which is rebounding. Many power forwards are noted for their mid-range jump-shot, and several players have become very accurate from 12 to 18 feet (3.7 to 5.5 m). Earlier, these skills were more typically exhibited in the European style of play. Some power forwards, known as stretch fours, have since extended their shooting range to three-point field goals.

In the NBA, power forwards usually range from 6' 4" (1.93 m) to 6' 11" (2.11 m). Despite the averages, a variety of players fit "tweener" roles which finds them in the small forward and/or center position depending upon matchups and coaching decisions. Some "natural" power forwards often play the Center (basketball) position and have the skills but lack the height that is associated with that position.

References

/*http://www.cbssports.com/nba/eye-on-basketball/24088180/stretch-4s-in-the-nba-the-balance-between-stretching-and-defense*/

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