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President of Colombia

 

President of Colombia

President of Colombia
Presidente de Colombia
Presidential Standard
Presidential Seal
Incumbent
Juan Manuel Santos

since 7 August 2010
Residence Casa de Nariño
Term length Four years
Inaugural holder Simón Bolívar
Formation 17 December 1819
Salary $23.460.630 ($13,000 USD)
Website The Presidency
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Colombia
Constitution

The President of Colombia (Spanish: Presidente de Colombia) is the head of state and head of government of Colombia. The office of president was established upon the ratification of the Constitution of 1819, by the Congress of Angostura, convened in December 1819, when Colombia was "la Gran Colombia". The first president, General Simón Bolívar,[1] took office in 1819. His position, initially self-proclaimed, was subsequently ratified by Congress.

The current president of the Republic of Colombia is Juan Manuel Santos, who took office on 7 August 2010.

Contents

  • Functions 1
  • General description 2
    • Requirements for holding 2.1
    • Term of office and election 2.2
  • Last election 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Functions

According to the Colombian Constitution of 1991, Article 188: The President of Colombia is the head of state, head of government and Supreme Administrative Authority. The President of Colombia symbolizes the National Unity and after taking an oath to the Constitution of Colombia and swearing to defend and protect the nation's laws, he is charged to guarantee and protect the Rights and Liberties of all the Colombian nationals. [5]

The Administrative Department of the Presidency of Colombia has the commission to assist or support the President of Colombia on its constitutional mandated functions and legal issues. [6]

Colombian Constitution of 1991 Article 115: States that the National Government is formed by the President of Colombia, the Vice President of Colombia, the Council of Ministers of the Republic of Colombia and the Directors of the Administrative Departments of Colombia. Any official from these entities constitute the Government of Colombia in any particular business.

Any act by the President of Colombia, in order to be legal and enforceable, must be sanctioned by any of the ministries or department directors, who will also be held responsible for the act. The only exception is if the President appoints or removes minister, administrative departments' directors and any other officials appointed by him under his administrative authority. Governors of the Departments of Colombia, Mayors of Municipalities of Colombia, as well as regional Superintendents of Colombia, public establishments and industrial and commercial state owned enterprises, are all part of the Executive branch of Colombia.

General description

The Colombian Constitution of 1991, coupled with several articles of amendment, establishes the requirements an eligible candidate must meet in order to become president, as well as the term of office, method of election, and powers.

Requirements for holding

Colombian Constitution of 1991 Article 191: states that the president must be a natural born citizen of Colombia and at least 30 years of age. [7]

Term of office and election

The president and vice president serve a term of office of four years after being elected by popular vote. Reelection in Colombia was not allowed until 24 November 2005 when the Colombian Congress approved it by introducing the Electoral Guarantees Law (Ley de Garantias Electorales) which modified Article 152, of the Colombian Constitution of 1991. The President or Vice President desiring a reelection must officially postulate its candidacy in the National Electoral Council and guarantee a fair competition for the other contenders, because of this, participation of acting officials in political proselytism was standardized. If the president or vice president are not running for office they are prohibited from participating on political proselytism. If one or both are participating, he/she is authorized to participate in these activities four months prior to the primary elections. Also, if the president and/or vice president are running for office they will also be authorized to participate in their political party's selection mechanism to postulate candidates. [8]

In 2010, the Constitutional Court of Colombia threw out a planned referendum to allow presidents to run for three consecutive terms. It ruled that Colombian presidents cannot serve three terms, even if they are nonconsecutive.

Last election

 Summary of the 25 May 2014 and 15 June 2014 Colombian presidential election results
Candidates – Parties First round Second round
Votes % Votes %
Juan Manuel SantosSocial Party of National Unity (Partido de «la U») 3,301,815 25.69 7,816,986 50.95
Óscar Iván Zuluaga - Democratic Center (Centro Democrático) 3,759,971 29.25 6,905,001 45.00
Marta Lucía RamírezColombian Conservative Party (Partido Conservador Colombiano) 1,995,698 15.52  
Clara López ObregónAlternative Democratic Pole (Polo Democrático Alternativo) 1,958,414 15.23
Enrique Peñalosa - Colombian Green Party (Partido Verde Colombiano) 1,065,142 8.28
Total votes for candidates 12,081,040 94.01 14,721,526 95.96
Blank votes 770,610 5.99 619,396 4.03
Total valid votes 12,851,650 97.24 15,341,383 97.12
Null votes 311,758 2.35 403,405 2.55
Unmarked ballots 52,994 0.40 50,152 0.31
Turnout 13,216,402 40.07% 15,794,940 47.89%
Source: Registraduría Nacional del Estado Civil, Registraduría Nacional del Estado Civil

See also

References

  1. ^ Gobernantes Colombianos, Ignacio Arismendi Posada, Interprint Editors Ltd., Italgraf, Segunda Edición, Page 15, Bogotá, Colombia, 1983

External links

  • Presidencia de la Republica de Colombia (Spanish)
  • Georgetown University - Requisites to be President of Colombia
  • Presidencia de Colombia - Ley de Garantias Electorales
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