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Prince George of Greece and Denmark

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Prince George of Greece and Denmark

Prince George
Born (1869-06-24)24 June 1869
Corfu, Greece
Died 25 November 1957(1957-11-25) (aged 88)
Saint-Cloud, Île-de-France, France
Burial Royal Cemetery, Tatoi Palace, Greece
Spouse Princess Marie Bonaparte
Issue Prince Peter
Princess Eugénie
House House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg
Father George I of Greece
Mother Olga Constantinovna of Russia
Religion Greek Orthodox

Prince George of Greece and Denmark (Olga Konstantinovna of Russia, and is remembered chiefly for having once saved the life of the future Emperor of Russia, Nicholas II. He served as high commissioner of the Cretan State during its transition towards independence from Ottoman rule and union with Greece.

Contents

  • Youth 1
  • Greek endeavors 2
  • Marriage and family 3
  • Titles, styles, honours, and arms 4
    • Titles and styles 4.1
  • Ancestry 5
  • References 6

Youth

From 1883, George lived at

  1. ^ Bertin, Celia (1982). "A False Happiness". Marie Bonaparte: A Life. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. pp. 85–86.  
  2. ^ Bertin, Celia (1982). "A False Happiness". Marie Bonaparte: A Life. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. pp. 109–112.  
  3. ^ Bertin, Celia (1982). "A False Happiness". Marie Bonaparte: A Life. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. pp. 82–84.  
  4. ^ Bertin, Celia (1982). Marie Bonaparte: A Life. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. pp. 16, 25, 68.  
  5. ^ Bertin, Celia (1982). "A False Happiness". Marie Bonaparte: A Life. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. pp. 83–88.  
  6. ^ Bertin, Celia (1982). "A False Happiness". Marie Bonaparte: A Life. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. pp. 88, 91.  
  7. ^ Bertin, Celia (1982). "A False Happiness". Marie Bonaparte: A Life. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. pp. 96–98.  
  8. ^ Bertin, Celia (1982). "A False Happiness". Marie Bonaparte: A Life. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. pp. 96–97, 101.  
  9. ^ Bertin, Celia (1982). "A False Happiness". Marie Bonaparte: A Life. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. p. 97.  
  10. ^ Bertin, Celia (1982). "Love, War and Another Love". Marie Bonaparte: A Life. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. p. 120.  
  11. ^ Bertin, Celia (1982). "Love, War and Another Love". Marie Bonaparte: A Life. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. pp. 122–128.  
  12. ^ Bertin, Celia (1982). "A False Happiness". Marie Bonaparte: A Life. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. pp. 194, 163.  
  13. ^ Bertin, Celia (1982). "Persecution, War, Exile". Marie Bonaparte: A Life. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. pp. 208, 234, 237, 242.  
  14. ^ Bertin, Celia (1982). "Unattainable Peace". Marie Bonaparte: A Life. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. pp. 253–255.  

References

Prince George was a paternal uncle of Prince Philip, the consort of Britain's Queen Elizabeth II.

Ancestry

Titles and styles

Titles, styles, honours, and arms

Rethimno, was named after Prince George.

On 21 February 1957 Princess Marie and her husband celebrated their House of Oldenburg of his generation. He was buried at Tatoi Royal Cemetery with Danish and Greek flags, his wedding ring, a lock of Valdemar's hair, a photo of Valdemar, and earth from Bernstorff.[14]

Styles of
Prince George of Greece and Denmark
Reference style His Royal Highness
Spoken style Your Royal Highness
Alternative style Sir

Prince George and Princess Marie had two children, Petros and Evgenia.

[13] Although he was on friendly terms with his wife's mentor,

[11] From 1913 to early 1916, George's wife carried on an intense flirtation, then an

[9] George wed Marie civilly in Paris on 21 November 1907, and in a

He courted her for twenty-eight days, confiding that he had experienced major disappointments when his roles in the Otsu incident and the Cretan governorship were misconstrued and under-appreciated by both individuals and governments whom he felt should have known better.[5] He also admitted that, contrary to what he knew were her hopes, he could not commit to living in France permanently since he had to remain prepared to undertake royal duties in Greece or Crete if summoned to do so. Once his proposal of marriage was tentatively accepted, the bride's father was astonished when George waived any contractual clause guaranteeing an allowance or inheritance from Marie; she would retain and manage her own fortune (a trust yielding 800,000 francs per annum) and only their future children would receive legacies.[6]

Following a Parisian luncheon between King George and Prince non-imperial branches of the Bonaparte dynasty, she was an heiress to the Blanc casino fortune through her mother.[4]

Prince George in uniform.
Marie Bonaparte and George

Marriage and family

[2] In October 1912 George returned from Paris to Athens so that he could join the naval ministry as Greece prepared for war against Turkey. Later he served as

During the revolt, the newly created Alexandros Zaimis, and left the island. In 1908, the Cretan Assembly unilaterally declared enosis (union) with Greece.

royalist, had assumed absolute power. Venizelos led the opposition to this. In 1905, however, he summoned an illegal revolutionary assembly in Theriso, in the hills near Chania, the then capital of the island, the "Theriso revolt".

In 1898, High Commissioner, and a joint Muslim-Christian assembly was part-elected, part-appointed. However, this was not enough to satisfy Cretan nationalists.

Although much of modern Greece had been independent since the 1820s, Crete remained in Ottoman hands. For the rest of the 19th century, there had been many rebellions and protests on the island. A Greek force arrived to annex the island in 1897 and the Great Powers acted, occupying the island and dividing it into British, French, Russian and Italian areas of control.

George, along with his brothers 1896 Summer Olympics in Athens. George served as president of the Sub-Committee for Nautical Sports.

Greek endeavors

In 1891, George accompanied his cousin the Tsarevich Nicholas on his voyage to Asia, and saved him from an assassination attempt in Japan, in what became known as the Otsu Incident.

[1]

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