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Meclinertant

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Title: Meclinertant  
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Meclinertant

Meclinertant
Systematic (IUPAC) name
2-([1-(7-Chloro-4-quinolinyl)-5-(2,6-dimethoxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carbonyl]amino)admantane-2-carboxylic acid
Clinical data
Legal status
?
Identifiers
CAS number  Y
ATC code ?
PubChem
IUPHAR ligand
UNII  Y
Chemical data
Formula C32H31ClN4O5 
Mol. mass 587.064
 Y   

Meclinertant (SR-48692) is a drug which acts as a selective, non-peptide antagonist at the neurotensin receptor NTS1, and was the first non-peptide antagonist developed for this receptor.[1][2] It is used in scientific research to explore the interaction between neurotensin and other neurotransmitters in the brain,[3][4][5][6][7][8] and produces anxiolytic, anti-addictive and memory-impairing effects in animal studies.[9][10][11][12]

References

  1. ^ Gully D, Canton M, Boigegrain R, Jeanjean F, Molimard JC, Poncelet M, Gueudet C, Heaulme M, Leyris R, Brouard A (January 1993). "Biochemical and pharmacological profile of a potent and selective nonpeptide antagonist of the neurotensin receptor". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 90 (1): 65–9.  
  2. ^ Gully D, Jeanjean F, Poncelet M, Steinberg R, Soubrié P, Le Fur G, Maffrand JP (1995). "Neuropharmacological profile of non-peptide neurotensin antagonists". Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology 9 (6): 513–21.  
  3. ^ Rostene W, Azzi M, Boudin H, Lepee I, Souaze F, Mendez-Ubach M, Betancur C, Gully D (April 1997). "Use of nonpeptide antagonists to explore the physiological roles of neurotensin. Focus on brain neurotensin/dopamine interactions". Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 814: 125–41.  
  4. ^ Jolas T, Aghajanian GK (August 1997). "Neurotensin and the serotonergic system". Progress in Neurobiology 52 (6): 455–68.  
  5. ^ Dobner PR, Deutch AY, Fadel J (June 2003). "Neurotensin: dual roles in psychostimulant and antipsychotic drug responses". Life Sciences 73 (6): 801–11.  
  6. ^ Chen L, Yung KK, Yung WH (September 2006). "Neurotensin selectively facilitates glutamatergic transmission in globus pallidus". Neuroscience 141 (4): 1871–8.  
  7. ^ Petkova-Kirova P, Rakovska A, Della Corte L, Zaekova G, Radomirov R, Mayer A (September 2008). "Neurotensin modulation of acetylcholine, GABA, and aspartate release from rat prefrontal cortex studied in vivo with microdialysis". Brain Research Bulletin 77 (2–3): 129–35.  
  8. ^ Petkova-Kirova P, Rakovska A, Zaekova G, Ballini C, Corte LD, Radomirov R, Vágvölgyi A (December 2008). "Stimulation by neurotensin of dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) release from rat prefrontal cortex: possible role of NTR1 receptors in neuropsychiatric disorders". Neurochemistry International 53 (6–8): 355–61.  
  9. ^ Griebel G, Moindrot N, Aliaga C, Simiand J, Soubrié P (December 2001). "Characterization of the profile of neurokinin-2 and neurotensin receptor antagonists in the mouse defense test battery". Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 25 (7–8): 619–26.  
  10. ^ Tirado-Santiago G, Lázaro-Muñoz G, Rodríguez-González V, Maldonado-Vlaar CS (October 2006). "Microinfusions of neurotensin antagonist SR 48692 within the nucleus accumbens core impair spatial learning in rats". Behavioral Neuroscience 120 (5): 1093–102.  
  11. ^ Felszeghy K, Espinosa JM, Scarna H, Bérod A, Rostène W, Pélaprat D (December 2007). "Neurotensin receptor antagonist administered during cocaine withdrawal decreases locomotor sensitization and conditioned place preference". Neuropsychopharmacology 32 (12): 2601–10.  
  12. ^ Lévesque K, Lamarche C, Rompré PP (October 2008). "Evidence for a role of endogenous neurotensin in the development of sensitization to the locomotor stimulant effect of morphine". European Journal of Pharmacology 594 (1–3): 132–8.  


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