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Saratoga, Wyoming

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Saratoga, Wyoming

Saratoga, Wyoming
Town
Location in Carbon County and the state of Wyoming.
Location in Carbon County and the state of Wyoming.
Saratoga, Wyoming is located in USA
Saratoga, Wyoming
Location in the United States
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Wyoming
County Carbon
Area[1]
 • Total 3.59 sq mi (9.30 km2)
 • Land 3.40 sq mi (8.81 km2)
 • Water 0.19 sq mi (0.49 km2)
Elevation 6,791 ft (2,070 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 1,690
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 1,663
 • Density 497.1/sq mi (191.9/km2)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP code 82331
Area code 307
FIPS code 56-68685[4]
GNIS feature ID 1609150[5]
Website http://www.saratoga.govoffice2.com/
Pick Bridge over the North Platte River, near Saratoga. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Saratoga is a town in Carbon County, Wyoming, United States. The population was 1,690 at the 2010 census.

Saratoga is the home of the Steinley Cup microbrew competition, usually held in August at Veterans Island Park, a playground and picnic facility located on a small island in the North Platte River. There is also a public pool heated by a hot spring located in Saratoga. Saratoga is one of many western communities economically devastated by consolidation, automation and the changing business practices of multinational timber companies. The town's two largest employers now are the United States Forest Service and Carbon County School District No. 2, both public sector employers. The town's motto is, "Where The Trout Leap In Main Street." The local newspaper is the Saratoga Sun.[6]

Contents

  • Geography and climate 1
  • Demographics 2
    • 2010 census 2.1
    • 2000 census 2.2
  • Notable residents 3
  • Education 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Geography and climate

Saratoga is located at (41.454474, -106.808413).[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 3.59 square miles (9.30 km2), of which, 3.40 square miles (8.81 km2) of it is land and 0.19 square miles (0.49 km2) is water.[1]

Climate data for Saratoga, Wyoming (1981–2010)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 34.2
(1.2)
36.8
(2.7)
46.0
(7.8)
56.0
(13.3)
66.0
(18.9)
76.2
(24.6)
82.7
(28.2)
81.0
(27.2)
71.6
(22)
58.9
(14.9)
42.9
(6.1)
34.1
(1.2)
57.2
(14)
Average low °F (°C) 12.0
(−11.1)
13.8
(−10.1)
21.8
(−5.7)
28.3
(−2.1)
36.4
(2.4)
44.3
(6.8)
50.4
(10.2)
48.7
(9.3)
39.9
(4.4)
30.0
(−1.1)
19.8
(−6.8)
11.9
(−11.2)
29.8
(−1.2)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 0.44
(11.2)
0.51
(13)
0.70
(17.8)
1.00
(25.4)
1.44
(36.6)
0.94
(23.9)
1.02
(25.9)
1.00
(25.4)
1.01
(25.7)
1.06
(26.9)
0.66
(16.8)
0.40
(10.2)
10.19
(258.8)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 8.8
(22.4)
7.7
(19.6)
8.7
(22.1)
6.3
(16)
1.7
(4.3)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
1.0
(2.5)
3.7
(9.4)
8.9
(22.6)
7.9
(20.1)
54.7
(138.9)
Source: NOAA[8]

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 1,690 people, 802 households, and 474 families residing in the town. The population density was 497.1 inhabitants per square mile (191.9/km2). There were 979 housing units at an average density of 287.9 per square mile (111.2/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 94.4% White, 0.9% Native American, 0.6% Asian, 2.2% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.1% of the population.

There were 802 households of which 21.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.0% were married couples living together, 6.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 40.9% were non-families. 34.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 13% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.07 and the average family size was 2.62.

The median age in the town was 48.9 years. 17.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 4.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21.3% were from 25 to 44; 34.6% were from 45 to 64; and 21.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 51.3% male and 48.7% female.

2000 census

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 1,726 people, 757 households, and 482 families residing in the town. The population density was 505.7 people per square mile (195.4/km²). There were 939 housing units at an average density of 275.1 per square mile (106.3/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 95.42% White, 0.12% African American, 0.81% Native American, 0.70% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 1.56% from other races, and 1.33% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.11% of the population.

There were 757 households out of which 27.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.4% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.3% were non-families. 31.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.23 and the average family size was 2.79.

In the town the age distribution of the population shows 23.1% under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 25.3% from 25 to 44, 28.9% from 45 to 64, and 17.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 100.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.2 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $37,135, and the median income for a family was $45,362. Males had a median income of $32,446 versus $20,489 for females. The per capita income for the town was $23,376. About 8.4% of families and 10.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.0% of those under age 18 and 12.2% of those age 65 or over.

Notable residents

From 1978-1982, Carbon County was represented in the Wyoming House of Representatives by Democrat Thomas E. Trowbridge (1930–2009), a dairy farmer from Saratoga. From 1982-1986, Trowbridge was a member of the Wyoming State Senate. He was later appointed by Governor Mike Sullivan to the Wyoming State Board of Equalization. Trowbridge's father, Elton Trowbridge, also a Democrat, held the state House seat from Carbon County from 1961 until his death in office in 1974.

Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Annie Proulx moved to Saratoga in 1994.

Education

Public education in the town of Saratoga is provided by Carbon County School District #2.

Saratoga has two schools, Saratoga High School and Saratoga Elementary School. The middle school was closed and demolished in 2005. Following the destruction of the building, the classes that would have normally been in that building were separated, part of them attending the elementary school and the remainder attending the high school. Saratoga has redeveloped an old school building into the multi-use Platte Valley Community Center, which hosts concerts, lectures, theatrical performance, and community events.

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010".  
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  3. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  6. ^ Saratoga Sun information from the Wyoming Press Association Saratoga is also home to the Old Baldy Club and in the summer hosts fishermen from all over trying their luck on the blue ribbon trout waters of the North Platte River.
  7. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  8. ^ "NOWData - NOAA Online Weather Data".  
  9. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  10. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 

External links

  • Town of Saratoga website

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