World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Sebaceous hyperplasia

Article Id: WHEBN0000395221
Reproduction Date:

Title: Sebaceous hyperplasia  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Fordyce spots, Sebaceous gland, List of cutaneous conditions, Propionibacterium acnes, Trichoepithelioma
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Sebaceous hyperplasia

Sebaceous hyperplasia
Classification and external resources
ICD-9-CM 706.9
eMedicine article/1059368

Sebaceous hyperplasia is a disorder of the sebaceous glands in which they become enlarged, producing yellow, shiny bumps on the face.[1]

Sebaceous glands are glands located within the skin and are responsible for secreting an oily substance named sebum. They are commonly associated with hair follicles but they can be found in hairless regions of the skin as well. Their secretion lubricates the skin, protecting it from drying out or becoming irritated.[2]

Sebaceous hyperplasia generally affects newborns as well as middle-aged to elderly adults. The symptoms of this condition are 1–5 mm papules on the skin, mainly on the forehead, nose and cheeks, and seborrheic facial skin. The papules may be cauliflower-shaped. Acne is also a symptom of this glandular disorder. It differs from the type of acne that affects adolescents and young adults in that it is of a more abnormally discolored composition.

See also

References

  1. ^ James, William D.; Berger, Timothy G.; et al. (2006). Andrews' Diseases of the Skin: Clinical Dermatology. Saunders Elsevier. p. 662.  
  2. ^ Jo Ann Coers Eurell, Brian L. Frappier (20062). Dellmann's textbook of veterinary histology. p. 29. 


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.