World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Second Chinese domination of Vietnam

The second Chinese domination marks a period when Vietnam fell into Chinese control for a second time, between the end of the Trưng Sisters and the start of the Anterior Lý Dynasty.

Contents

  • Fluctuations thru seven dynasties 1
  • Uprisings 2
  • References 3
    • Bibliography 3.1

Fluctuations thru seven dynasties

The Trung sisters' independence rule was one of the few relatively brief interruptions during the Chinese domination of Vietnam which continued from 111 BC to 939.

After the defeat of the Trung sisters, the Eastern Han dynasty strengthened its control over the region in 43 and renamed it Giao Chỉ (or Jiaozhi). As the Han dynasty weakened, the prefect of Giao Chỉ, Shi Xie, ruled Vietnam as an autonomous warlord and was posthumously deified by later Vietnamese Emperors.[1]

Even when the Eastern Han dynasty split into the Three Kingdoms in 220, Vietnam remained under the control of the state of Wu. A female rebel named Triệu Thị Trinh briefly pushed the Chinese rulers out in 248, but was soon overthrown. Then Vietnam was under Jin China and the first half of the Southern and Northern Dynasties. The domination ended by 544, when Lý Nam Đế came to power.[2]

Uprisings

Local rebellions were organized by:

References

  1. ^ Taylor (1983), p. 70
  2. ^ Taylor (1983), p. 135

Bibliography

  • Taylor, Keith Weller. (1983). The Birth of Vietnam (illustrated, reprint ed.). University of California Press. ISBN . Retrieved 7 August 2013.
  • Vietnam
Preceded by
Trưng Sisters
Dynasty of Vietnam
43–544
Succeeded by
Anterior Lý Dynasty
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.