World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Supreme Military Command of the People's Republic of China

Article Id: WHEBN0000262328
Reproduction Date:

Title: Supreme Military Command of the People's Republic of China  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: People's Liberation Army, Military of the People's Republic of China, PLA Academy of Military Science, 301 Military Hospital, People's Liberation Army General Armaments Department
Collection: Military of the People's Republic of China, Politics of China
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Supreme Military Command of the People's Republic of China


Throughout the history of the People's Republic of China, the position that effectively reigned as the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces changed from time to time. During some periods, it was not exactly clear who was the supreme commander of the People's Liberation Army.

From 1954 to 1968, the de jure Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces was the President of the People's Republic of China, who was also the Chairman of the National Defence Council. However, a similar command structure inside the communist party known as the Party Central Military Commission (China), whose Chairman was the de facto Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces. The Chairman of the Central Military Commission, Mao Zedong, who the Chairman of the Communist Party. Chairman of the National Defence Council included Liu Shaoqi, who from 1959 to 1968, was PRC's President. Even though the President was the de jure supreme commander of the military, it nonetheless was a subordinate of the CMC Chairman.

From 1969 to 1978, the head of the military was the Chairman of the Communist Party of China. This gave constitutional power to the head of the Chinese Communist Party.

From 1978 onwards, the Commander-in-Chief was the Chairman of the Central Military Commission. This position, however did not always give the person entitled the top command as was the case with Hua Guofeng. Deng Xiaoping was able to effectively control the military as the Chief of Staff of the PLA from 1978-1980.

See also

See template below.

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.