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Tas2r16

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Tas2r16

Taste receptor, type 2, member 16
Identifiers
Symbols  ; T2R16
External IDs IUPHAR: GeneCards:
RNA expression pattern
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez
Ensembl
UniProt
RefSeq (mRNA)
RefSeq (protein)
Location (UCSC)
PubMed search

TAS2R16 (taste receptor, type 2, member 16) is a human gene that encodes for a receptor that may play a role in the perception of bitterness. [1][2]

The TAS2R16 gene is located on the long (q) arm of chromosome 7 at position 31.1 - 31.3, from base pair 122,228,764 to base pair 122,229,639.

Contents

  • Clinical significance 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • Further reading 4
  • External links 5

Clinical significance

Variants of this gene have been linked to an increased risk for alcohol dependence.[3]

There is an East African origin for high salicin sensitivity, and thus sensitivity to bitterness in people from this region, with this phenotype matched to TAS2R16 variants.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Bufe B, Hofmann T, Krautwurst D, Raguse JD, Meyerhof W (2002). "The human TAS2R16 receptor mediates bitter taste in response to beta-glucopyranosides". Nat Genet 32 (3): 397–401.  
  2. ^ Drewnowski A (2001). "The science and complexity of bitter taste". Nutr Rev 59 (6): 163–9.  
  3. ^ Hinrichs AL, Wang JC, Bufe B, Kwon JM, Budde J, Allen R, Bertelsen S, Evans W, Dick D, Rice J, Foroud T, Nurnberger J, Tischfield JA, Kuperman S, Crowe R, Hesselbrock V, Schuckit M, Almasy L, Porjesz B, Edenberg HJ, Begleiter H, Meyerhof W, Bierut LJ, Goate AM (2006). "Functional variant in a bitter-taste receptor (hTAS2R16) influences risk of alcohol dependence". Am. J. Hum. Genet. 78 (1): 103–11.  
  4. ^ Campbell MC, Ranciaro A, Zinshteyn D, Rawlings-Goss R, Hirbo J, Thompson S, Woldemeskel D, Froment A, Rucker JB, Omar SA, Bodo JM, Nyambo T, Belay G, Drayna D, Breslin PA, Tishkoff SA (2014). "Origin and Differential Selection of Allelic Variation at TAS2R16 Associated with Salicin Bitter Taste Sensitivity in Africa". Mol Biol Evol 31 (2): 288–302.  

Further reading

  • Kinnamon SC (2000). "A plethora of taste receptors.". Neuron 25 (3): 507–10.  
  • Margolskee RF (2002). "Molecular mechanisms of bitter and sweet taste transduction.". J. Biol. Chem. 277 (1): 1–4.  
  • Montmayeur JP, Matsunami H (2002). "Receptors for bitter and sweet taste.". Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 12 (4): 366–71.  
  • Adler E, Hoon MA, Mueller KL, Chandrashekar J, Ryba NJ, Zuker CS (2000). "A novel family of mammalian taste receptors.". Cell 100 (6): 693–702.  
  • Chandrashekar J, Mueller KL, Hoon MA, Adler E, Feng L, Guo W, Zuker CS, Ryba NJ (2000). "T2Rs function as bitter taste receptors.". Cell 100 (6): 703–11.  
  • Firestein S (2000). "The good taste of genomics.". Nature 404 (6778): 552–3.  
  • Matsunami H, Montmayeur JP, Buck LB (2000). "A family of candidate taste receptors in human and mouse.". Nature 404 (6778): 601–4.  
  • Bufe B, Hofmann T, Krautwurst D, Raguse JD, Meyerhof W (2002). "The human TAS2R16 receptor mediates bitter taste in response to beta-glucopyranosides.". Nat. Genet. 32 (3): 397–401.  
  • Zhang Y, Hoon MA, Chandrashekar J, Mueller KL, Cook B, Wu D, Zuker CS, Ryba NJ (2003). "Coding of sweet, bitter, and umami tastes: different receptor cells sharing similar signaling pathways.". Cell 112 (3): 293–301.  
  • Fischer A, Gilad Y, Man O, Pääbo S (2005). "Evolution of bitter taste receptors in humans and apes.". Mol. Biol. Evol. 22 (3): 432–6.  
  • Go Y, Satta Y, Takenaka O, Takahata N (2006). "Lineage-specific loss of function of bitter taste receptor genes in humans and nonhuman primates.". Genetics 170 (1): 313–26.  
  • Mueller KL, Hoon MA, Erlenbach I, Chandrashekar J, Zuker CS, Ryba NJ (2005). "The receptors and coding logic for bitter taste.". Nature 434 (7030): 225–9.  
  • Hinrichs AL, Wang JC, Bufe B, Kwon JM, Budde J, Allen R, Bertelsen S, Evans W, Dick D, Rice J, Foroud T, Nurnberger J, Tischfield JA, Kuperman S, Crowe R, Hesselbrock V, Schuckit M, Almasy L, Porjesz B, Edenberg HJ, Begleiter H, Meyerhof W, Bierut LJ, Goate AM (2006). "Functional variant in a bitter-taste receptor (hTAS2R16) influences risk of alcohol dependence.". Am. J. Hum. Genet. 78 (1): 103–11.  
  • Behrens M, Bartelt J, Reichling C, Winnig M, Kuhn C, Meyerhof W (2006). "Members of RTP and REEP gene families influence functional bitter taste receptor expression.". J. Biol. Chem. 281 (29): 20650–9.  

External links

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