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The Mummy's Tomb

The Mummy's Tomb
The Mummy's Tomb
Directed by Harold Young
Produced by Ben Pivar
Written by Neil P. Varnick (story)
Starring Lon Chaney, Jr.
Dick Foran
John Hubbard
Cinematography George Robinson
Edited by Milton Carruth
Distributed by Universal Studios
Release dates
  • October 23, 1942 (1942-10-23)
Running time
61 minutes
Language English

The Mummy's Tomb is the 1942 horror film sequel to The Mummy's Hand (1940).

Lon Chaney, Jr. disliked the role of Kharis the mummy. Make-up artist Jack Pierce spent up to eight hours to wrap Chaney. A rubber mask was used for long shots. For unknown reasons, Wallace Ford's character's name is changed from Jenson from the previous film to Hanson in this film.

Contents

  • Plot 1
  • Critical reaction 2
  • Cast 3
  • Production and release 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Plot

The Mummy's Tomb picks up the story thirty years after the conclusion of the previous last film. It begins with Steve Banning (Dick Foran) reciting the story of Kharis to his family and evening guests in his Mapleton, Massachusetts home. Footage from The Mummy's Hand appears as Banning tells his tale. As he concludes his tale of the successful destruction of the creature, the scene switches back to the tombs of Egypt.

Surviving their supposed demise, Andoheb (Lon Chaney, Jr.) to his follower, Mehemet Bey (Turhan Bey). After passing on the instructions for the use of the tana leaves and assigning the task of terminating the remaining members of the Banning Expedition and their descendants, Andoheb expires. Bey and Kharis leave Egypt for the journey to the United States.

Bey takes the caretaker's job at the local cemetery, sets up shop and administers the tana brew to Kharis. The monster sets out to avenge the desecration of Ananka's tomb. His first victim is Stephen Banning, whom the creature kills as the aging archaeologist prepares for bed.

As the Sheriff (Cliff Clark) and Coroner (Emmett Vogan) can't come up with a lead, newspapermen converge on Mapleton to learn more about the murder. Babe Hanson (Wallace Ford) arrives on the scene after learning of his friend's death. When Jane Banning (Mary Gordon), Steve's sister, is killed, Hanson is convinced it is the work of a mummy.

Meeting with the Sheriff and Coroner, Hanson is unable to convince them of the identity of the culprit. He tells his story to a newspaperman at the local bar, but is himself dispatched by Kharis almost immediately afterwards.

John Banning enlists the help of Professor Norman (Frank Reicher) to solve the puzzle of the "grayish mark" found on the victims. Norman's test results prove that Hanson was right, the substance was indeed mold from a mummy.

Meanwhile, Bey has plans of his own. Knowing that Banning and his girlfriend, Isobel Evans (Elyse Knox) are planning to marry, he sets out to disrupt their nuptials. Bey himself has become smitten with Isobel, and sends Kharis on a mission to bring her to him. Kharis initially balks, but finally adheres to Bey's command.

In an effective sequence, the monster stealthily enters the Evans' home and abducts the girl. At the cemetery, Bey unveils his plan to the reluctant Isobel, explaining that she is to become the bride of a High Priest of Karnak, and bear him an heir to the royal line.

Banning and the rest of the townspeople have become convinced that their recent Egyptian transplant may be involved in the crimes. Arriving in force, they confront Bey at the cemetery. Kharis slips away with Isobel unbeknownst to the horde, and Bey attempts to shoot Banning, but is himself gunned down by the Sheriff. The creature is observed heading toward the Banning estate, and the group begins pursuit.

Inside the home, Banning manages to rescue Isobel from Kharis with the aid of the Sheriff and Coroner. The townspeople set fire to the house, and the monster perishes in the flames. Banning and Isobel wed, and the curse is brought to an end.

Critical reaction

Critical reviews of the film are mostly negative. Some film critics felt the movie failed to live up to the standards of other Universal horror films.

Cast

Production and release

This was the first of Lon Chaney's three mummy features, begun June 1, 1942, and released October 23, on a double bill with "Night Monster. " The film was released on October 23 1942 and later had a re-release in February 1 1948.[1]Later part of the original Shock Theater package of 52 Universal titles released to television in 1957, followed a year later with Son of Shock, which added 20 more features.

References

  1. ^ Interent Movie Database Trivia

External links

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