Triamcinolone furetonide

Triamcinolone is a long-acting synthetic corticosteroid given orally, by injection, by inhalation, or as a topical ointment or cream.

Uses

Triamcinolone is used to treat several different medical conditions, such as eczema, psoriasis, arthritis, allergies, ulcerative colitis, lupus, sympathetic ophthalmia, temporal arteritis, uveitis, ocular inflammation, Urushiol-induced contact dermatitis, visualization during vitrectomy and the prevention of asthma attacks. It will not treat an asthma attack once it has already begun.[1][2][3] It has also been used off-label for macular degeneration.[4]

Prior to 2007 it was manufactured under the name Azmacort as a corticosteroid inhaler for asthma long-term care. The patent holder, Sanofi, sold it under the brand name Nasacort.

In 2010, TEVA and Perrigo launched the first generic inhalable triamcinolone.[5]

Triamcinolone is used to alleviate infection-induced eczema in fungal skin infections in the combination drug of econazole/triamcinolone.

Triamcinolone acetonide is one of the ingredients of Ledermix - an endodontic (tooth's root canal) lotion used between sessions.

Forms

Different triamcinolone derivatives are available, including acetonide, benetonide, furetonide, hexacetonide and diacetate.

Triamcinolone acetonide is a more potent type of triamcinolone, being about eight times as effective as prednisone.

Side effects

Side effects of triamcinolone include sore throat, nosebleeds, increased coughing, headache, and runny nose. White patches in the throat or nose indicate a serious side effect. Symptoms of an allergic reaction include rash, itch, swelling, severe dizziness, trouble breathing.[6] An additional side effect for women is a prolonged menstrual cycle.

Trade names

Trade names for triamcinolone include Aristocort, Kenacort, Kenalog, Tricort, Triaderm, Azmacort, Trilone, Volon A, Tristoject, Tricortone and Ratio-Triacomb.

See also

References


External links

  • Triamcinolone Topical | MedlinePlus
  • Triamcinolone (Topical Application Route) | MayoClinic

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