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Tricyclic

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Tricyclic

Tricyclics are chemical compounds that contain three interconnected rings of atoms.

Many compounds have a tricyclic structure, but in pharmacology, the term has traditionally been reserved to describe heterocyclic drugs. Among these are antidepressants, antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and antihistamines (as antiallergens, anti-motion sickness drugs, antipruritics, and hypnotics/sedatives) of the dibenzazepine, dibenzocycloheptene, dibenzothiazepine, dibenzothiepin, phenothiazine, and thioxanthene chemical classes, and others.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Gallery 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

History

Gallery

Antidepressants

Imipramine

Amitriptyline

Mirtazapine

Iprindole

Tianeptine

Antipsychotics

Chlorpromazine

Thioridazine

Chlorprothixene

Loxapine

Clozapine

Antihistamines

Promethazine

Cyproheptadine

Latrepirdine

Loratadine

Rupatadine

Others

Carvedilol

Cyclobenzaprine

Pizotifen

Monatepil

See also

References

  1. ^ Kay, G. G.; Harris, A. G. (1999). "Loratadine: a non-sedating antihistamine. Review of its effects on cognition, psychomotor performance, mood and sedation". Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 29 Suppl 3: 147–150.  
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