Turkish minorities

The Turkish minorities (Turkish: Türk azınlıklar) refers to ethnic Turks who live in independent states which were formerly part of the Ottoman Empire. In the 19th century these states obtained independence from Ottoman rule but still contain relict Turkish communities.

Demographics


Country Census figures Alternate estimates Further information Lists of Turks by country
 Abkhazia (1897 census) 1,347[1] 731 (2011 census)[2] 15,000[3] Turks in Abkhazia
 Algeria 600,000-3,300,000[4][5][6] Turks in Algeria
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 267 (1991 census)[7] 50,000[8][9] Turks in Bosnia and Herzegovina
 Bulgaria 588,318 (2011 census)[10] 800,000[11] Turks in Bulgaria List of Bulgarian Turks
 Cyprus
 Northern Cyprus
-
260,000 (2006 census)
2,000[12]
300,000[13]-500,000[14]
Turkish Cypriots List of Cypriots
 Egypt 100,000[15]-1,500,000[16] Turks in Egypt List of Egyptian Turks
 Georgia 1,375 (1989 census)[17] 1,000[18] Meskhetian Turks
 Greece
Western Thrace
Athens
Rhodes and Kos
Crete
Total unknown
80,000[19]-150,000[20][21][22]
10,000[23]
5,000[24][25]
Turks in Western Thrace
Turks in Athens
Turks in Rhodes and Kos
Turks in Crete
 Iraq 567,000 (1957 census)[26] 500,000-3,000,000[27][28] Turks in Iraq
 Israel 22,000 gentiles
77,000 Jews
Turks in Israel
Turkish Jews (in Israel)
 Jordan 60,000[29] Turks in Jordan
 Kosovo 10,445 (1991 census) 50,000[30][9] Turks in Kosovo
 Lebanon 80,000[31] Turks in Lebanon
 Libya 35,000 (in 1936)[32]- 50,000[29] Turks in Libya
 Republic of Macedonia 77,959 (2002 census)[33] 170,000-200,000[34][35] Turks in Macedonia List of Macedonian Turks
 Montenegro 397 (1971 census)[36][37] 2,500[38] Turks in Montenegro
 Romania 32.098 (2002 census)[39] 55,000[40] Turks in Romania
 Serbia 30,000 Turks in Serbia
 Saudi Arabia 150,000[29] Turks in Saudi Arabia
 Syria 750,000 to 1,500,000[41] Turks in Syria
 Tunisia 500,000[29]-2,000,000[42] Turks in Tunisia
 Yemen 10,000-30,000[43][44] Turks in Yemen
Total

See also

References and notes

Bibliography

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