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United States House of Representatives elections in Washington, 2014

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United States House of Representatives elections in Washington, 2014

United States House of Representatives elections in Washington, 2014

November 4, 2014 (2014-11-04)

All 10 Washington seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 6 4
Seats won 6 4
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 1,047,747 981,853
Percentage 51.62% 48.38%

The 2014 United States House of Representatives elections in Washington were held on Tuesday, November 4, 2014 to elect the ten U.S. Representatives from the state of Washington, one from each of the state's ten congressional districts. The state certified the results on December 4. The nonpartisan blanket primary election was held on August 5, with the top two candidates for each position advancing to the general election.

Overview

Summary of votes cast in the general election
United States House of Representatives elections in Washington, 2014[1]
Party Votes Percentage Seats Before Seats After +/–
Democratic 1,047,747 51.62% 6 6 -
Republican 981,853 48.38% 4 4 -
Totals 2,029,600 100% 10 10 -

District 1

The first district was represented by Democrat Suzan DelBene since her special election to replace Jay Inslee, who resigned to serve as Governor of Washington in 2012. DelBene won re-election.[1]

In the primary DelBene easily advanced to face former Microsoft software engineer Pedro Celis, who defeated three fellow Republicans and two independent candidates in the top-two primary.[2][3]

Blanket primary results

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Suzan DelBene 59,364 50.68
Republican Pedro Celis 19,228 16.41
Republican Robert J. Sutherland 18,306 15.63
Republican John Orlinski 11,880 10.07
Republican Edwin F. Moats 5,221 4.46
No party preference Richard J. Todd 2,032 1.73
Independent Mike The Mover[5] 1,186 1.01
Total votes 117,137 100

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Suzan
DelBene (D)
Pedro
Celis (R)
Undecided
Moore Information* October 2014 301 ± 6% 43% 34% 23%
  • * Internal poll for the Celis campaign

Results

Washington's 1st Congressional District - November 4, 2014 [1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Suzan DelBene (Incumbent) 124,151 55.04
Republican Pedro Celis 101,428 44.96
Total votes 225,579 100
Democratic hold

District 2

The second district was represented by Democrat Rick Larsen since 2001. Larsen won re-election, defeating Republican B.J. Guillot in the general election. Independent Mike Lapointe was eliminated in the primary.[6][1]

Blanket primary results

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rick Larsen 60,788 55.59
Republican B.J. Guillot 35,801 32.74
Independent Mike Lapointe 12,763 11.67
Total votes 109,352 100

General election results

Washington's 2nd Congressional District - November 4, 2014 [1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rick Larsen (Incumbent) 122,173 60.57
Republican B.J. Guillot 79,518 39.43
Total votes 201,691 100.0
Democratic hold

District 3

The third district was represented by Republican Jaime Herrera Beutler since 2011. Herrera Beutler won re-election. Businessman and former Maria Cantwell aide Bob Dingethal ran as a Democrat, facing Herrera Beutler in the general election.[1][7]

In the primary, Herrera Beutler was also opposed by Republican Michael Delavar, who ran against Brian Baird in 2008 and served as a councilman for Washougal from 2009 to 2011.[8]

Blanket primary results

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jaime Herrera Beutler 58,445 48.84
Democratic Bob Dingethal 45,426 37.96
Republican Michael Delavar 15,806 13.21
Total votes 119,677 100

General election results

Washington's 3rd Congressional District - November 4, 2014 [1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jaime Herrera Beutler (Incumbent) 124,796 61.53
Democratic Bob Dingethal 78,018 38.47
Total votes 202,814 100.0
Republican hold

District 4

The 4th district is a large and predominantly rural district in Central Washington that encompasses numerous counties and is dominated by the Tri-Cities and Yakima areas. Republican Doc Hastings, who represented the 4th district since 1995, retired.[9]

The district was not considered to be competitive. The last time any Democrat running for any partisan office carried it was when State Auditor Brian Sonntag was re-elected in 2004.[10]

For the first time in Washington state history, the winners of the top-two primary for a U.S. Congressional race were members of the same party. Clint Didier and Dan Newhouse, both Republicans, competed for the seat in November. Although only one "serious" Democratic candidate was on the ballot, Estakio Beltran, David Wasserman of The Cook Political Report speculated that without an incumbent for Democrats to vote against and recognising that Beltran had "no hope" of winning the seat in November, 4th district Democrats might have "strategically [voted] for a Republican they may favor." [11] Ultimately, Dan Newhouse won the seat.[1]

Republican Party

Candidates

Declared
Withdrew
Declined

Democratic Party

Candidates

Declared
  • Estakio Beltran, former congressional policy adviser[29]
  • Tony Sandoval, businessman and activist[30][11]
Withdrew
  • Joe Buchanan, mechanical engineer[31]
  • Gary Downing, artist and photographer[22][21]
  • Mohammed Said, physician and candidate for this seat in 2012[31]
  • Tony Williams[32]

Independent

Candidates

Declared
  • Josh Ramirez, project control specialist at Washington River Protection Solutions[17]
  • Richard Wright, retired physical therapist[11]

Endorsements

Blanket primary results

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Clint Didier 33,028 31.74
Republican Dan Newhouse 26,773 25.73
Democratic Estakio Beltran 12,583 12.09
Republican Janéa Holmquist Newbry 10,883 10.46
Republican George Cicotte 6,777 6.51
Democratic Tony Sandoval 6,528 6.27
Independent Richard Wright 3,180 3.06
Republican Gavin Seim 2,023 1.94
Independent Josh Ramirez 1,438 1.38
Republican Glen R. Stockwell 524 0.50
Republican Gordon Allen Pross 173 0.17
Republican Kevin Midbust 157 0.15
Total votes 104,067 100

General election

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Clint
Didier (R)
Dan
Newhouse (R)
Undecided
The Polling Company September 16–17, 2014 400 ± 4.9% 35% 33% 26%

Results

Washington's 4th Congressional District - November 4, 2014 [1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dan Newhouse 77,772 50.81
Republican Clint Didier 75,307 49.19
Total votes 153,079 100.0
Republican hold

District 5

The fifth district was represented by Republican Cathy McMorris Rodgers, the House Republican Conference Chairwoman, since 2005. She won re-election.[1] Her chief opponent was Democrat Joe Pakootas, the chief executive officer of the Colville Tribal Federal Corporation, ran against her.[42]

Blanket primary results

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Cathy McMorris Rodgers 73,835 51.75
Democratic Joseph (Joe) Pakootas 40,875 28.65
Independent Dave Wilson 16,261 11.40
Republican Tom Horne 11,710 8.21
Total votes 141,681 100

General election results

Washington's 5th Congressional District - November 4, 2014 [1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Cathy McMorris Rodgers (Incumbent) 135,470 60.68
Democratic Joseph Pakootas 87,772 39.32
Total votes 223,242 100.0
Republican hold

District 6

The sixth district was represented by Democrat Derek Kilmer since 2013, who was re-elected, defeating Republican candidate Marty McClendon in the general election.[1]

Blanket primary results

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Derek Kilmer 82,119 58.72
Republican Marty McClendon 48,010 34.33
Green Douglas Milholland 4,882 3.49
No party preference W. (Greybeard) McPherson 4,844 3.46
Total votes 139,855 100

General election results

Washington's 6th Congressional District - November 4, 2014 [1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Derek Kilmer (Incumbent) 141,265 62.98
Republican Marty McClendon 83,025 37.02
Total votes 224,290 100.0
Democratic hold

District 7

The seventh district was represented by Democrat Jim McDermott since 1989. McDermott won re-election against Craig Keller, Republican, with over 80% of the vote.[1]

Blanket primary results

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim McDermott 112,791 76.82
Republican Craig Keller 13,494 9.19
Republican Scott Sutherland 9,604 6.54
Independent Doug McQuaid 9,284 6.32
Independent Goodspaceguy 1,643 1.12
Total votes 146,816 100

General election results

Washington's 7th Congressional District - November 4, 2014 [1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim McDermott (Incumbent) 203,954 80.97
Republican Craig Keller 47,921 19.03
Total votes 251,875 100.0
Democratic hold

District 8

The eight district was represented by Republican Dave Reichert since 2005. Reichert was re-elected. Democrat Jason Ritchie, an Issaquah small business owner, was the challenger in the general election. [43][1]

External links
  • Dave Reichert campaign website
  • Jason Ritchie campaign website

Blanket primary results

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dave Reichert 66,124 62.53
Democratic Jason Ritchie 30,449 28.79
Democratic Keith Arnold 9,173 8.67
Total votes 105,746 100

General election results

Washington's 8th Congressional District - November 4, 2014 [1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Dave Reichert (Incumbent) 125,741 63.27
Democratic Jason Ritchie 73,003 36.73
Total votes 198,744 100.0
Republican hold

District 9

The ninth district was represented by Democrat Adam Smith beginning in 1997. He was re-elected, defeating Republican Doug Basler.[1]

Blanket primary results

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Adam Smith 58,903 63.99
Republican Doug Basler 25,080 27.25
Democratic Don Rivers 5,352 5.81
Independent Mark Greene 2,709 2.94
Total votes 92,044 100

General election results

Washington's 9th Congressional District - November 4, 2014 [1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Adam Smith (Incumbent) 118,132 70.83
Republican Doug Basler 48,662 29.17
Total votes 166,794 100.0
Democratic hold

District 10

The tenth district was represented by Democrat Denny Heck since 2013, who won re-election.[1] Pierce County Councilwoman and former State Representative Joyce McDonald ran against him as a Republican.[44]

Blanket primary results

Nonpartisan blanket primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Denny Heck 51,398 51.57
Republican Joyce McDonald 41,172 41.31
Independent Jennifer Gigi Ferguson 4,777 4.79
Independent Sam Wright 2,316 2.32
Total votes 99,663 100

General election results

Washington's 10th Congressional District - November 4, 2014 [1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Denny Heck (Incumbent) 99,279 54.7
Republican Joyce McDonald 82,213 45.3
Total votes 181,492 100.0
Democratic hold

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j
  5. ^ Prefers National Union Party
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^ a b
  10. ^
  11. ^ a b c d
  12. ^ a b
  13. ^ Yakima Herald Republic | Cicotte formally announces for 4th District
  14. ^
  15. ^ a b
  16. ^ Yakima Herald Republic | Former state ag director Newhouse officially joins 4th District race
  17. ^ a b
  18. ^
  19. ^
  20. ^
  21. ^ a b
  22. ^ a b
  23. ^ a b c d
  24. ^ a b c
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r
  26. ^ a b
  27. ^
  28. ^
  29. ^
  30. ^
  31. ^ a b
  32. ^
  33. ^ a b c d e f
  34. ^
  35. ^
  36. ^
  37. ^
  38. ^
  39. ^ a b c d
  40. ^
  41. ^
  42. ^
  43. ^
  44. ^ Joyce McDonald to run for U.S. House | Politics | The News Tribune

External links

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