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United States Senate election in California, 2010

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United States Senate election in California, 2010

United States Senate election in California, 2010

November 2, 2010

 
Nominee Barbara Boxer Carly Fiorina
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 5,218,441 4,217,366
Percentage 52.2% 42.2%

County results

U.S. Senator before election

Barbara Boxer
Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

Barbara Boxer
Democratic

The 2010 United States Senate election in California took place on November 2, 2010. The election was held alongside 33 other United States Senate election in addition to congressional, state, and various local elections. Incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer won re-election to a fourth term.

Democratic primary

Candidates

Controversies

Boxer

In 2009, Boxer was criticized for berating a general for calling her "ma'am." Brigadier General Michael Walsh was testifying on the Louisiana coastal restoration process in the wake of Hurricane Katrina and answered Boxer's query with "ma'am" when Boxer interrupted him. "Do me a favor," Boxer said. "can you say 'senator' instead of 'ma'am?'" "Yes, ma'am," Walsh interjected. "It's just a thing, I worked so hard to get that title, so I'd appreciate it. Thank you," she said. The Army's guide to protocol instructs service members to call members of the U.S. Senate "sir," "ma'am" or "senator."[1][2][3] Boxer's adversary in the 2010 Senate election, Carly Fiorina, used this incident prominently in campaign ads.

Results

California Democratic Senate primary, 2010
Candidate Votes Percentage
Barbara Boxer (incumbent) 1,957,920 81.0%
Brian Quintana 338,442 13.9%
Mickey Kaus 123,573 5.1%
Total votes 2,419,935 100%

Republican primary

Candidates

Controversies

Fiorina

In February 2010, Carly Fiorina put out a campaign ad attacking Republican rival Tom Campbell featuring a "demon sheep", creating international, mostly negative, publicity.[4][5]

The Los Angeles Times research of public records indicated Fiorina had failed to vote in most elections. Fiorina responded by saying, "I'm a lifelong registered Republican but I haven't always voted, and I will provide no excuse for it. You know, people die for the right to vote. And there are many, many Californians and Americans who exercise that civic duty on a regular basis. I didn't. Shame on me."[6][7]

Campbell

Former State Senator and California Secretary of State Bruce McPherson alleged that during a telephone call with Carly Fiorina's campaign manager, Marty Wilson, Wilson expressed surprise that McPherson was endorsing the candidacy of Tom Campbell, and called him an anti-Semite.[8] Subsequently, Wilson strongly denied having made that charge against Campbell, thus leading to a controversy for the Fiorina campaign, where the credibility of long-time Sacramento political operative Marty Wilson was called into a comparison with that of Bruce McPherson.

On March 5, the three principal Republican primary candidates, Campbell, DeVore, and Fiorina participated in a live, on-air debate, which was broadcast on KTKZ in Sacramento. The debate was called by Campbell, in order to respond to accusations of "anti-Semitism," and otherwise being unfriendly to the interests of Israel.[9]

Campbell had also been criticized for having accepted campaign contributions (during his [11][12] The usually subdued Tom Campbell responded very strongly to the accusations coming out of the Fiorina campaign, saying, "I called for this debate today so that both of my opponents can bring up absolutely any charge they want. Air it, and let me respond to it. But there’s no place for calling me anti-Semitic, then denying it. That whispering campaign, that 'silent slander,' stops today."[13]

A dispute had been triggered as well by Campbell's 2002 letter in defense of Al-Arian. Campbell said he had not been aware of the charges against Al-Arian when he wrote his January 21, 2002, letter to USF's president, asking USF not to discipline Al-Arian.[14][15][16]

He also said he had not been aware that Al-Arian had said, in a speech discussed in an O'Reilly interview before Campbell wrote his letter: "Jihad is our path. Victory to Islam. Death to Israel."[17] Campbell said:
I did not hear, I did not read, I was not aware of statements Sami Al-Arian had made relative to Israel. And I would not have written the letter had I known about those. ... To say 'Death to Israel' is abhorrent, it's horrible.[17]

Campbell said he erred in not researching Al-Arian more thoroughly before writing his letter in Al-Arian's defense, that while he was not aware he "should have" been aware of Al-Arian's statements, and that he now regrets having written the letter.[14][17][18][19] “I was wrong,” he said.[18] “I should not have done so. I regret it.”[18] At the same time, however, in the letter itself, Campbell had written: "I read a transcript of the O'Reilly Factor interview".[20]

Campbell had initially maintained that Al-Arian had never contributed to Campbell's 2000 Senate campaign.[21] That turned out to be untrue.[21] Campbell also initially said his letter defending Al-Arian was sent before the O'Reilly 2001 television broadcast where Al-Arian admitted saying "death to Israel," but that also turned out to be incorrect.[21] Campbell said his misstatements were the result of the events having taken place years prior.[21]

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
Error
Tom Campbell Carly Fiorina Chuck DeVore Other Unde-
cided
Survey USA (report) June 3–6, 2010 569 ±4.2% 22% 48% 16% 9%
Los Angeles Times (report) May 19–26, 2010 1,506 ±2.6% 23% 38% 16% 23%
Survey USA (report) May 21–23, 2010 612 ±4.3% 23% 46% 14% 6% 11%
Public Policy Polling (report) May 21–23, 2010 417 ±4.8% 21% 41% 16% 18%
PPIC (report) May 9–16, 2010 1,168 ±3.0% 23% 25% 16% 36%
Research 2000 (report) May 17–19, 2010 400 ±5.0% 37% 22% 14% 27%
Survey USA (report) May 6–9, 2010 548 ±4.3% 35% 24% 15% 3% 23%
Survey USA (report) April 19–21, 2010 538 ±4.3% 34% 27% 14% 3% 23%
Los Angeles Times (report) March 23–30, 2010 1,515 ±2.6% 29% 25% 9% 4% 33%
PPIC (report) March 24, 2010 2,002 ±2.0% 23% 24% 8% 1% 44%
Research 2000 (report) March 10, 2010 400 ±5.0% 33% 24% 7% 36%
M4 Strategies (report) February 26, 2010 427 32% 19% 11% 39%
PPIC (report) January 27, 2010 2,001 ±2.0% 27% 16% 8% 1% 48%
The Field Poll (report) January 5–17, 2010 202 ±7.1% 30% 25% 6% 39%
Los Angeles Times (report) Oct. 27–November 3, 2009 499 27% 27% 2% 40%
The Field Poll (report) Sept. 18–October 6, 2009 373 ±4.5% 21% 20% 59%
The Field Poll (report) Feb. 20–March 1, 2009 298 ±3.6% 31% 19% 36%

Results

California Republican Senate primary, 2010
Candidate Votes Percentage
Carly Fiorina 1,315,429 56.4%
Tom Campbell 504,289 21.7%
Chuck DeVore 452,577 19.3%
Al Ramirez 42,149 1.8%
Tim Kalemkarian 19,598 0.8%
Total votes 2,334,042 100%

Third party primaries

Candidates

American Independent
  • Don Grundmann, chiropractor and candidate for U.S. Senate in 2006
  • Edward Noonan, small business owner
  • Al Salehi, political analyst
Green
  • Duane Roberts, community volunteer
Libertarian
  • Gail Lightfoot, retired nurse
Peace and Freedom
  • Marsha Feinland, retired teacher and former Peace and Freedom presidential candidate

Results

California American Independent Senate primary, 2010
Candidate Votes Percentage
Edward Noonan 16,704 39.5%
Don Grundmann 14,170 33.5%
Al Salehi 11,423 27.0%
Total votes 42,297 100%
California Senate primary, 2010 (others)
Party Candidate Votes %
Green Duane Roberts 19,983 100.00%
Libertarian Gail Lightfoot 17,791 100.00%
Peace and Freedom Marsha Feinland 4,070 100.00%

General election

Candidates

The following were certified by the California Secretary of State as candidates in the primary election for senator.[22] Candidates who won their respective primaries and qualified for the general election are shown in bold.

Campaign

Boxer criticized Fiorina's choice "to become a CEO, lay off 30,000 workers, ship jobs overseas [and] have two yachts." A spokesman for Fiorina responded that the Fiorinas were a two-yacht family because they spent time in both California and Washington, D.C.[23]

Debates

The only debate took place on September 1 at Saint Mary's College of California in Moraga. It was sponsored by San Francisco Chronicle, KTVU, and KQED.[24]

Predictions

Polling

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Barbara Boxer (D) Carly Fiorina (R) Other Undecided
Public Policy Polling (report) October 29–31, 2010 882 ± 3.3% 50% 46% 3%
SurveyUSA (report) October 26–31, 2010 587 ± 4.1% 46% 38% 6% 10%
Angus Reid Public Opinion (report) October 28–29, 2010 485 ± 4.5% 51% 44% 5%
Rasmussen Reports (report) October 27, 2010 750 ± 4.0% 49% 46% 2% 3%
CNN/Time/Opinion Research (report) October 20–26, 2010 1,527 ± 2.5% 50% 45% 1%
Field Poll (report) October 14–26, 2010 1,501 ± 3.2% 49% 41% 10%
SurveyUSA (report) October 21–25, 2010 594 ± 4.1% 45% 40% 7% 8%
Suffolk University (report) October 21–24, 2010 600 ± 4.0% 52% 43% 4% 2%
Fox/Pulse Opinion Research (report) October 23, 2010 1,000 ± 3.0% 48% 44% 5% 3%
Public Policy Polling (report) October 21–23, 2010 622 ± 3.2% 52% 43% 0% 5%
Rasmussen Reports (report) October 21, 2010 750 ± 4.0% 48% 46% 3% 3%
USC/LA Times (report) October 13–20, 2010 878 ± 3.2% 50% 42% 4% 4%
Tarrance Group (report) October 17–19, 2010 ± 4.1% 44% 44% 6% 5%
PPIC (report) October 10–17, 2010 1,067 ± 3.5% 43% 38% 6% 13%
Reuters (report) October 12–14, 2010 601 ± 4.0% 46% 45% 2% 6%
Rasmussen Reports (report) October 13, 2010 750 ± 4.0% 49% 46% 2% 3%
Angus Reid Public Opinion (report) October 6, 2010 501 ± 4.5% 55% 39% 6%
Rasmussen Reports (report) October 3, 2010 750 ± 4.0% 49% 45% 2% 5%
USC poll report September 27, 2010 1,003 39% 34% 23%
PPIC report September 19–26, 2010 1,104 ± 3% 42% 35% 6% 17%
CNN/Time/Opinion Research Corporation (report) September 24–28, 2010 786 ± 3.5% 52% 43% 3% 2%
Survey USA (report) September 19–21, 2010 610 ± 4.0% 49% 43% 6% 2%
Rasmussen Reports (report) September 20, 2010 750 ± 4.0% 47% 43% 4% 6%
Fox News/Pulse Opinion Research (report) September 18, 2010 1,000 ± 3.0% 47% 46% 3% 4%
Public Policy Polling (report) September 14–16, 2010 630 ± 3.9% 50% 42% 8%
Fox News (report) September 11, 2010 1,000 ± 3.0% 46% 44% 4% 6%
Rasmussen Reports (report) September 6, 2010 750 ± 4.0% 47% 48% 2% 3%
Rasmussen Reports (report) September 6, 2010 750 ± 4.0% 42% 47%
CNN(report) September 2–7, 2010 866 ± 3.5% 48% 44% 5% 3%
Survey USA (report) August 31-September 1, 2010 569 ± 4.2% 46% 48% 5% 1%
Rasmussen Reports (report) August 24, 2010 750 ± 4.0% 44% 43% 5% 8%
Survey USA/CBS 5 (report) August 9–11, 2010 602 ± 4.0% 42% 47% 11%
Rasmussen Reports (report) August 3, 2010 750 ± 4.0% 45% 40% 5% 10%
Public Policy Polling (report) July 23–25, 2010 614 ± 3.95% 49% 40% 11%
Rasmussen Reports (report) July 12, 2010 500 ± 4.5% 49% 42% 4% 5%
Survey USA (report) July 8–11, 2010 614 ± 4.0% 45% 47% 3% 5%
Reuters (report) June 30, 2010 600 ± 4.5% 45% 41% 1% 13%
Rasmussen Reports (report) June 9, 2010 500 ± 4.5% 48% 43% 5% 5%
Public Policy Polling (report) May 21–23, 2010 921 ± 3.2% 45% 42% 13%
Los Angeles Times (report) May 19–26, 2010 44% 38%
Research 2000 (report) May 17–19, 2010 600 ± 4.0% 48% 39%
PPIC (report) May 9–16, 2010 2,003 ± 2.0% 48% 39% 13%
Rasmussen Reports (report) May 12, 2010 500 ± 4.5% 45% 38% 4% 12%
Rasmussen Reports (report) April 12, 2010 500 ± 4.5% 42% 38% 7% 13%
PPIC (report) March 24, 2010 2,002 ± 2.0% 44% 43% 13%
The Field Poll (report) March 18, 2010 748 ± 3.7% 45% 44% 11%
Rasmussen Reports (report) March 11, 2010 500 ± 4.5% 46% 40% 4% 10%
Research 2000 (report) March 10, 2010 600 ± 4.0% 49% 40% 11%
Rasmussen Reports (report) February 11, 2010 500 ± 4.5% 46% 42% 7% 5%
PPIC (report) January 27, 2010 2,001 ± 2.0% 48% 40% 12%
The Field Poll (report) January 5–17, 2010 1,005 ± 3.2% 50% 35% 15%
Rasmussen Reports (report) January 14, 2010 500 ± 4.5% 46% 43% 3% 8%
Rasmussen Reports (report) November 17, 2009 500 ± 4.5% 46% 37% 5% 12%
The Field Poll (report) Sept. 18–October 6, 2009 1,005 ± 3.2% 49% 35% 16%
Rasmussen Reports (report) September 23, 2009 500 ± 4.5% 49% 39% 4% 8%
Research 2000 (report) August 9–12, 2009 600 ± 4.0% 52% 31% 17%
Rasmussen Reports (report) July 22, 2009 500 ± 4.5% 45% 41% 7% 7%
Rasmussen Reports (report) March 9, 2009 500 ± 4.5% 47% 38% 10% 5%
The Field Poll (report) Feb. 20–March 1, 2009 761 ± 3.6% 55% 25% 20%

Fundraising

Candidate (party) Receipts Disbursements Cash on hand Debt
Boxer, BarbaraBarbara Boxer (D) $20,314,189 $22,178,746 $2,271,034 $0
Fiorina, CarlyCarly Fiorina (R) $17,935,605 $16,664,055 $1,271,550 $805,844
Carroll, JerryJerry Carroll (I) $140 $140 $10 $1,305
Feinland, MarshaMarsha Feinland (P&F) $0 $0 $0 $0
Goldberg, NeilNeil Goldberg (I) $0 $0 $0 $0
Lightfoot, GailGail Lightfoot (L) $0 $0 $0 $0
Noonan, EdwardEdward Noonan (AI) $0 $0 $0 $0
Roberts, DuaneDuane Roberts (G) $0 $0 $0 $12,562
Source: Federal Election Commission (FEC)[25]
(Note that some candidates filed with the FEC, but did not pursue their candidacy.)

Results

United States Senate election in California, 2010[26]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Barbara Boxer (Incumbent) 5,218,441 52.2%
Republican Carly Fiorina 4,217,366 42.2%
Libertarian Gail Lightfoot 175,242 1.8%
Peace and Freedom Marsha Feinland 135,093 1.4%
Green Duane Roberts 128,510 1.2%
American Independent Edward Noonan 125,441 1.2%
N/A James E. Harris (Write-in) 41 0.0%
N/A Connor Vlakancic (Write-in) 11 0.0%
N/A Jerry Leon Carroll (Write-in) 10 0.0%
N/A Hans J. Kugler (Write-in) 5 0.0%
Invalid or blank votes %
Totals 10,000,160 100%
Voter turnout %

References

  1. ^ "Sen. Boxer to officer: Don't call me ma'am". Washington Times. 2009-06-19. Retrieved 2010-05-25. 
  2. ^ Sen. Boxer Offers No Apology for Rebuking Brigadier General Who Called Her 'Ma'am'
  3. ^ Barbara Boxer is a Senator, damn it, and don’t you forget it (video)
  4. ^ Garofoli, Joe (2010-02-05). "Demon sheep' ad may be bad move, experts say".  
  5. ^ snu (2010-04-28). "Wackelnder demokratischer Senatssitz" [Uncertain Democratic Senate seat].  
  6. ^ Hiltzik, Michael (2009-11-05). "Carly Fiorina's Senate campaign an uninspiring product launch".  
  7. ^ Lin, Judy (2009-11-07). "Fiorina: 'Shame on me' for not voting more".  
  8. ^ Mehta, Seema (2010-02-25). "GOP Senate race grows heated over Israel".  
  9. ^ Freking, Kevin and Hindery, Robin (2010-03-05). "Calif. Senate debate focuses on support for Israel".  
  10. ^ Mehta, Seema (2010-03-04). "DeVore, Campbell face-to-face in GOP Senate debate; Fiorina to phone in".  
  11. ^ "Plea Agreement; U.S. v. Al-Arian" (PDF).  
  12. ^ MegLaughlin, In his plea deal, what did Sami Al-Arian admit to?, St. Petersberg Times, April 23, 2006.
  13. ^ Hogue News, "Spirited CA GOP Senatorial Debate," by Eric Hogue (March 5, 2010 – retrieved on March 5, 2010).
  14. ^ a b Mehta, Seema (March 15, 2010). "Letter on Muslim radical roils GOP Senate race; Website posts text contradicting Tom Campbell's claim of writing on behalf of donor Sami Al-Arian before 9/11.". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved March 15, 2010. 
  15. ^ "Fiorina aide accused of calling Campbell an anti-Semite – San Jose Mercury News". Mercurynews.com. February 25, 2010. Retrieved March 16, 2010. 
  16. ^ The Associated Press. Calif. Senate candidate on defensive over Israel", ''Associated Press'', March 9, 2010, accessed March 15, 2010""". Mercurynews.com. Retrieved March 30, 2010. 
  17. ^ a b c "Tom Campbell letter stokes controversy over ties to jihadist". Mercury News. March 9, 2010. Retrieved March 14, 2010. 
  18. ^ a b c Marelius, John (March 14, 2010). "Fiorina lashes out at Boxer, ‘destructive elitism’; Senate candidate, opponents squabble at GOP convention". San Diego Union Tribune. Retrieved March 17, 2010. 
  19. ^ "McLaughlin, Ken, "Candidates for California governor promise to release income tax returns," ''Mercury News'', March 13, 2010, accessed March 17, 2010". Mercurynews.com. Retrieved March 30, 2010. 
  20. ^ "Campbell, Tom, "Letter to President Genshaft", January 21, 2002, accessed March 17, 2010" (PDF). Retrieved March 30, 2010. 
  21. ^ a b c d Mehta, Seema (January 21, 2002). "Republican Senate candidate's professorial style may be out of step". latimes.com. Retrieved March 30, 2010. 
  22. ^ "2010 Gubernatorial Primary - June 8, 2010: Official Certified List of Candidates" (PDF).  
  23. ^ Matier, Phillip; Andrew Ross (July 19, 2010). "Boxer calls out Fiorina as multiple yacht owner".  
  24. ^ "Barbara Boxer for U.S. Senate - News - News Coverage | Boxer and Fiorina set to debate". Barbaraboxer.com. 2010-08-06. Retrieved 2010-08-21. 
  25. ^ "2010 House and Senate Campaign Finance for California".  
  26. ^ [1]

External links

  • California Secretary of State – Elections and Voter Information
  • U.S. Congress candidates for California at Project Vote Smart
  • California U.S. Senate from OurCampaigns.com
  • Campaign contributions from Open Secrets
  • 2010 California Senate Election graph of multiple polls from Pollster.com
  • Election 2010: California Senate from Rasmussen Reports
  • 2010 California Senate Race from Real Clear Politics
  • 2010 California Senate Race from CQ Politics
  • Race profile from The New York Times
Debates
Official campaign sites
  • Barbara Boxer
  • Marsha Feinland
  • Carly Fiorina
  • Don Grundmann
  • Gail Lightfoot
  • Peter Putnam
  • Duane Roberts
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