World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

White perch

Article Id: WHEBN0000047360
Reproduction Date:

Title: White perch  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Popes Creek (Virginia), Morone, Webber Pond, Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida, Indian Well State Park
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

White perch

White perch
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Osteichthyes
Order: Perciformes
Family: Moronidae
Genus: Morone
Species: M. americana
Binomial name
Morone americana
(J. F. Gmelin, 1789)
Synonyms
  • Perca americana J. F. Gmelin, 1789
  • Roccus americanus (J. F. Gmelin, 1789)
  • Perca immaculata Walbaum, 1792
  • Morone rufa Mitchill, 1814
  • Morone pallida Mitchill, 1814

The white perch, Morone americana, is not a true perch but is, rather, a fish of the temperate bass family, Moronidae, notable as a food and game fish in eastern North America.

The name "white perch" is sometimes applied to the white crappie.

Generally silvery-white in color, hence the name, depending upon habitat and size specimens have begun to develop a darker shade near the dorsal fin and along the top of the fish. This sometimes earns them the nickname "black-back". White perch have been reported up to 49.5 cm (19.5 in.) in length and weighing 2.2 kg (4.8 lbs.).

Although favoring brackish waters, it is also found in fresh water and coastal areas from the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario south to the Pee Dee River in South Carolina, and as far east as Nova Scotia. They are also found in the lower Great Lakes and Chesapeake Bay. The raw meat is of a somewhat pinkish hue, but when cooked, it is white and flaky. At times, a parasite known as Lironeca ovalis is located in the gills. They are only known to reduce the growing rate of white perch.

Contents

  • Diet 1
  • Reproduction 2
  • Aquatic nuisance species 3
  • References 4

Diet

White perch are known to eat the eggs of many species native to the Great Lakes, such as walleye and other true perches. At times, fish eggs are 100% of their diet. They prefer to eat small minnows like mud minnows and fathead minnows. In the Chesapeake Bay, white perch commonly prey upon grass shrimp, razor clams, and bloodworms which are all common to the region.

Reproduction

White perch are a prolific species. The female can deposit over 150,000 eggs in a spawning session, lasting just over a week. Several males will often attend a spawning female, and each may fertilize a portion of her eggs. The young hatch within one to six days of fertilization.

The white perch is currently recovering from a loss of population in the Hudson River.

Morone americana

Aquatic nuisance species

Some states consider the white perch to be a nuisance species due to its ability to destroy fisheries. They have been associated with the declines in both walleye and white bass populations because they feed heavily on baitfish used by those species and outcompete them for food and space. Many states have enacted laws forbidding possession of live white perch. Additionally, these states recommend not releasing captured white perch back into the water to help control its spread.

References

  1. ^ NatureServe 2013. Morone americana. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. . Downloaded on 15 February 2014.
  • http://www.dnr.state.md.us/fisheries/fishfacts/whiteperch.asp
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.