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World Confederation of Labour

WCL/CMT
Full name World Confederation of Labour
Founded 1920
Date dissolved 31 October 2006
Merged into ITUC
Members 26 million in 116 countries[2]
Affiliation International
Office location Brussels, Belgium
Country International
Website www.cmt-wcl.org

The World Confederation of Labour (WCL) was an international labour organization founded in 1920 and based in Europe. Totalitarian governments of the 1930s repressed the federation and imprisoned many of its leaders, limiting operations until the end of World War II. In 2006 it became part of the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC), ending its existence as an independent organization.

Contents

  • History 1
    • Founding 1.1
    • Rise of fascism and World War II 1.2
    • Cold War era 1.3
    • WCL reformation 1.4
    • Globalization and ITUC merger 1.5
  • Areas of activity 2
    • Human rights and international labour standards 2.1
    • Women workers 2.2
    • Child labour 2.3
    • Migrant workers 2.4
    • Economics and society 2.5
    • Informal economy 2.6
    • Training 2.7
    • Trade action 2.8
    • International solidarity foundation 2.9
  • See also 3
  • Further reading 4
  • Notes 5

History

Founding

The WCL was founded at The Hague in 1920 under the name of the International Federation of Christian Trade Unions (IFCTU) as a confederation of trade unions associated with the Christian Democratic parties of Europe.[1] Originally catering to Roman Catholic constituencies, the IFCTU was designed to provide an alternative to the secular trade unions in Europe at the time, basing its foundation on the Rerum novarum and the Quadragesimo anno.[2]

The first statutes adopted by the group proclaimed its intention to struggle not only for workers' labour rights, but also values like human dignity, democracy, and international solidarity.[1] Jos Serrarens became the first secretary-general of the IFCTU; Joseph Scherrer was its first president.

Rise of fascism and World War II

In the late 1920s, global economic tumult compounded the growth of authoritarian governments in Europe, which the IFCTU opposed. In response, German officials of the 1930s sent the group's leaders to Nazi concentration camps, and Benito Mussolini banned its Italian affiliate.[1]

During

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "History." Conféderation Mondiale du Travail/World Confederation of Labour. Retrieved on August 19, 2007.
  2. ^ a b c "World Confederation of Labour Archives". International Institute of Social History. Retrieved on August 19, 2007.
  3. ^ www.cmt-wcl.org - official site.
  4. ^ "New global realities demand a new kind of unionism" co-authored by Willy Thys, WCL secretary-general, in 1996
  5. ^ Report on Trade Union Rights Worldwide - 1996-1997 issued by WCL
  6. ^ The World of Trade Action - WCL newsletter archive (2004-2006).
  7. ^ "Human Rights & International Labour Standards". Conféderation Mondiale du Travail/World Confederation of Labour. Retrieved on August 19, 2007.
  8. ^ "Women Workers". Conféderation Mondiale du Travail/World Confederation of Labour. Retrieved on August 19, 2007.
  9. ^ "ICFTU and Global March strategy meeting outcomes on combating child labour". Global March Against Child Labour. Retrieved on August 19, 2007.
  10. ^ "Child labour". Conféderation Mondiale du Travail/World Confederation of Labour. Retrieved on August 19, 2007.
  11. ^ "Migration: one of the faces of globalisation". Conféderation Mondiale du Travail/World Confederation of Labour. Retrieved on August 19, 2007.
  12. ^ "WCL relations with IMF and World Bank Group: Evaluation and Recommendations". Online in PDF format. Conféderation Mondiale du Travail/World Confederation of Labour. Retrieved on August 19, 2007.
  13. ^ "Informal Economy". Conféderation Mondiale du Travail/World Confederation of Labour. Retrieved on August 19, 2007.
  14. ^ "Brazil: trade union launches recycling project for informal economy workers". Conféderation Mondiale du Travail/World Confederation of Labour. Retrieved on August 19, 2007.
  15. ^ "Capacity Building". Conféderation Mondiale du Travail/World Confederation of Labour. Retrieved on August 19, 2007.
  16. ^ "Jointly with the WCL, the ISF launches a solidarity campaign in Asia". Conféderation Mondiale du Travail/World Confederation of Labour. Retrieved on August 19, 2007.

Notes

  •  

Further reading

See also

. National Trade Union Confederation (Romania), and the Christelijk Nationaal Vakverbond, the Confederation of Christian Trade Unions The foundation worked in partnership with a variety of other groups, including the [16] The WCL created the International Solidarity Foundation (ISF) to promote cross-country worker unity and provide emergency assistance (from a Solidarity Fund, established in 1958) to organizations in need. After the

International solidarity foundation

The information clearinghouse of the WCL, Trade Action served to promote training; facilitate exchange of knowledge and advice; and support members' participation at meetings of international institutions. It also produced a newsletter, The World of Trade Action.

Trade action

[15] The WCL worked to provide

Training

Workers in a society's informal economy — 60 to 90% of the active work population of Africa, according to the ILO[13] — function outside of regulatory and government oversight. The WCL worked to help train local advocates and provide relief to workers in need, including a recycling program for informal economy workers in Brazil.[14]

Informal economy

Pursuant to the rise of globalization and interest in taking a larger view of World Bank and International Monetary Fund.[12]

Economics and society

The rights of migrants — as humans and as workers — was a particular focus of the WCL's work, especially given its increased presence in a globalized economy.[11]

Migrant workers

[10] The WCL worked in support of the Global March Against

Child labour

The World Women's Committee of the WCL convened "representatives from the continents" annually to advocate for women workers and address problems specific to female labourers.[8]

Women workers

The WCL worked to enforce respect for international law, especially as codified by the ILO. The organization also sought to introduce labour standards into international trade policies.[7]

Human rights and international labour standards

The WCL had nine areas of labour activity where it focused work.

Areas of activity

The WCL was formally dissolved on 31 October 2006 when it merged with the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions (ICFTU) to form the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC).

As World Social Forum.[1]

Globalization and ITUC merger

In 1968, delegates to the organization's 16th congress in Luxembourg voted to transform it into the World Confederation of Labour (WCL). Breaking with the federation's strictly Christian ideology of the past, the newly adopted Declaration of Principles stated it would henceforth be guided by "either a spiritual concept based on the conviction that man and universe are created by God, or other concepts that lead together with it to a common effort to build a human community united in freedom, dignity, justice and brotherhood."[1]

In the late 1950s, the IFCTU found itself working more frequently with Muslim and Buddhist workers in Asia and Africa. In 1959, the IFCTU convened a seminar in Saigon to determine the possibilities for points of unity among world religions in matters of social behaviour.[1]

WCL reformation

[2] The matter of affiliation with the

When the World Federation of Trade Unions (WFTU) was founded in September 1945, it invited the IFCTU to join. Delegates to an October congress in Brussels voted to reject the invitation, on the grounds that the WFTU's global unity was "too artificial".[1]

Cold War era

[6][5][4][3] after the end of the war.Eastern Europe The federation had difficulty renewing ties with most of its affiliates in [2][1]

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