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1918

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1918

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries: 19th century20th century21st century
Decades: 1880s  1890s  1900s  – 1910s –  1920s  1930s  1940s
Years: 1915 1916 191719181919 1920 1921
1918 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 1918
MCMXVIII
Ab urbe condita 2671
Armenian calendar 1367
ԹՎ ՌՅԿԷ
Assyrian calendar 6668
Bahá'í calendar 74–75
Bengali calendar 1325
Berber calendar 2868
British Regnal year 7 Geo. 5
Buddhist calendar 2462
Burmese calendar 1280
Byzantine calendar 7426–7427
Chinese calendar 丁巳(Fire Snake)
4614 or 4554
    — to —
戊午年 (Earth Horse)
4615 or 4555
Coptic calendar 1634–1635
Discordian calendar 3084
Ethiopian calendar 1910–1911
Hebrew calendar 5678–5679
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1974–1975
 - Shaka Samvat 1840–1841
 - Kali Yuga 5019–5020
Holocene calendar 11918
Igbo calendar 918–919
Iranian calendar 1296–1297
Islamic calendar 1336–1337
Japanese calendar Taishō 7
(大正7年)
Juche calendar 7
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 13 days
Korean calendar 4251
Minguo calendar ROC 7
民國7年
Thai solar calendar 2461

1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (dominical letter F), the 1918th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 918th year of the 2nd millennium, the 18th year of the 20th century, and the 9th year of the 1910s decade between 1583 and 1929 and with Julian Value: 1918 is 13 calendar days difference, which continued to be used until the complete conversion of the Gregorian calendar was entirely done in 1929.

Events

Below, events of World War I have the "WWI" prefix.

January

February

  • February 1 – The Cattaro Mutiny sees Austrian sailors in the Gulf of Cattaro (Kotor), led by two Czech Socialists, mutiny.
  • February 5 – The SS Tuscania is torpedoed off the Irish coast; it is the first ship carrying American troops to Europe to be torpedoed and sunk.

March

April

May

June

Austro-Hungarian battleship Szent István sunk by Italian torpedo boats

July

August

September

October

November

Proclamation of German Republic by Philipp Scheidemann in Berlin on the Reichstag balcony
Signatories to the Armistice with Germany (Compiègne), ending WWI, pose outside Marshal Foch's railway carriage.
Front page of The New York Times on Armistice Day, November 11, 1918.

December

Date unknown

Births

January

February

March

Image of President Woodrow Wilson created by 21,000 soldiers at Camp Sherman, Chillicothe, Ohio

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Date unknown

Lou Dorfsman, American graphic designer (d. 2008)

Deaths

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Nobel Prizes

References

  1. ^ "Historical Concert for the Benefit of Widows and Orphans". World Digital Library. 2014-02-10. Retrieved 2014-06-22. 
  2. ^  
  3. ^ Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006.  
  4. ^ Shores, Christopher (1969). Finnish Air Force, 1918–1968. Reading, Berkshire, UK: Osprey Publications Ltd. p. 3.  
  5. ^ Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 355–356.  
  6. ^ Royal Canadian Legion Branch # 138. "2-Minute Wave of Silence" Revives a Time-honoured Tradition. Accessed on 5 June 2014.
  7. ^ The first was from Allahabad to Naini Junction in India on 18 February 1911 and the second from London to Windsor Castle on 22 June 1911.
  8. ^ "La Grippe Espagnole de 1918".  
  9. ^ "Carpathia Sunk; 5 of Crew Killed".  
  10. ^ Lichfield, John (2014-07-07). "A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: The ‘blackest day’ of the German army".  
  11. ^ Pitt, Barrie (2003). 1918: The Last Act. Barnsley: Pen and Sword.  
  12. ^  
  13. ^ Biger, Gideon (2004). The Boundaries of Modern Palestine, 1840–1947. London: Routledge. pp. 55, 164.  
  14. ^  
  15. ^ Ward, Margaret (1983). Unmanageable Revolutionaries: Women and Irish nationalism. London: Pluto Press. p. 137.  
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