World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

1922 College Football Season

Article Id: WHEBN0016206708
Reproduction Date:

Title: 1922 College Football Season  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: 1921 college football season, List of college football seasons, 1922 LSU Tigers football team, 1922 Wisconsin Badgers football team, Ernest C. Wills
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

1922 College Football Season

The 1922 NCAA football season had a number of unbeaten and untied teams, and no clear-cut champion, with the Official NCAA Division I Football Records Book listing California, Cornell, Iowa, Princeton, and Vanderbilt as national champions.[2]

The Southern Conference would begin its first season of football in 1922.

Rule changes

The 1922 season included the new "try for a point" rule.[3] One was allowed to either kick an extra point after a touchdown as usual, or to place the ball anywhere beyond the five yard line and try to score either by touchdown or by a kick, and receive the one point if successful. On the "try for a point," any foul by the defense awarded the offense the point, and any foul by the offense made the try no good

Conference and program changes

School 1921 Conference 1922 Conference
Alabama Crimson Tide SIAA SoCon
Auburn Tigers SIAA SoCon
Brigham Young Cougars New Program Rocky Mountain
Clemson Tigers SIAA SoCon
Florida Gators SIAA SoCon
Buldogs SIAA SoCon
Yellow Jackets SIAA SoCon
Idaho Vandals Independent Pacific Coast
Kentucky Wildcats SIAA SoCon
LSU Tigers SIAA SoCon
Maryland Terrapins SAIAA SoCon
Mississippi Rebels SIAA SoCon
Mississippi A&M Bulldogs SIAA SoCon
North Carolina Tar Heels SAIAA SoCon
NC State Wolfpack SAIAA SoCon
South Carolina Gamecocks SIAA SoCon
Southern California Trojans Independent Pacific Coast
Tennessee Volunteers SIAA SoCon
Tulane Green Wave SIAA SoCon
Virginia Cavaliers SAIAA SoCon
VPI Fighting Gobblers SAIAA SoCon
Vanderbilt Commodores SIAA SIAA/SoCon
Washington and Lee Generals SAIAA SoCon

September

September 30 Harvard beat Middlebury 20-0, Princeton beat Johns Hopkins 30-0, and Cornell beat St. Bonaventure 55-6. Vanderbilt opened its season with a 38-0 win over Middle Tennessee Normal (now MTSU). Baylor beat North Texas 55-0 California beat Santa Clara 45-14.

October

October 7 Princeton defeated Virginia 5-0, Harvard beat Holy Cross 20-0, and Cornell beat Niagara 66-0 Vanderbilt beat Henderson-Brown College 33-0 North Carolina lost to Yale at New Haven, 18-0. Iowa beat Knox College 61-0, and Michigan defeated Case 48-0 Drake opened its season with a win over Cornell College of Iowa, 16-0 Baylor beat Hardin-Simmons 42-0 In a meeting with the visiting Mare Island Marines service team, California routed them 80-0.

October 14 Princeton beat Colgate 10-0, Harvard defeated Bowdoin 15-0, and Cornell beat New Hampshire 68-7 At New Haven, Iowa defeated Yale 6-0.

In Nashville, Michigan and Vanderbilt played to a 0-0 tie at the inaugural game for Dudley Field, the first dedicated football-only stadium in the South in the style of the Eastern schools. After beating Duke 20-0 in a Thursday game, North Carolina beat South Carolina, 10-7. Drake defeated Kansas 6-0. California beat St. Mary's 41-0.

October 21 In Dallas, Vanderbilt and Texas, both unbeaten, met, with the Commodores winning 20-10. In Houston, Baylor defeated Rice 31-0. North Carolina won at NC State, 14-9. Harvard had been shocked the year before in a 6-0 upset by the "Prayin' Colonels" of Centre College of Danville, Kentucky. In the rematch, the Crimson beat Centre 24-10. Princeton recorded another shutout, blanking Maryland 26-0.

Cornell defeated Colgate 14-0

Iowa won at Illinois 8-7, and Michigan won at Ohio State 19-0; In St. Louis, Drake beat Washington University, 31-7 Baylor beat Arkansas 60-13 California shut out the Olympic Club team, 25-0.

October 28 In the first football game ever broadcast nationally on the radio Princeton (4-0-0) traveled to the University of Chicago (3-0-0) for a rematch of Chicago's 1921 win. The game was witnessed by 32,000 fans, and listened to on New York's WEAF radio station.[4] John Thomas ran for three touchdowns and Chicago's Maroons led 18-7 as the fourth quarter began, but a 40 yard fumble return closed the gap. In the closing minutes, Princeton back Harry Crum was buried under a pile of players as he plunged toward the goal line, and when the mass was untangled, it was a touchdown. With the help of a superior kicking game, Princeton won 21-18.[5]

Harvard defeated Dartmouth 12-3. Iowa beat Purdue 56-0, and Michigan beat Illinois 24-0 Baylor beat Mississippi College 40-7

Vanderbilt beat Mercer 25-0 North Carolina defeated Maryland 27-3

California was 4-0-0, and USC was 5-0-0, when the teams met in Pasadena. Cal had a 2-0 lead at halftime, and held off USC on two goal line stands, before scoring a touchdown and a field goal to win 12-0.[6]

November

November 4 Princeton beat Swarthmore, 22-13. Harvard beat the visiting Florida Gators 24-0 Cornell (5-0-0) trounced Columbia, which had been 4-1-0, by a score of 56-0

Michigan beat Michigan State 63-0, having outscored its opponents 154-0 in its first five games. Vanderbilt won at Tennessee, 14-6. Baylor beat Texas A&M 13-7 Drake defeated Iowa State 14-7 In New Orleans, North Carolina defeated Tulane 19-12. California defeated Washington State, 61-0.

November 11 Princeton and Harvard were both unbeaten(6-0-0) when the Tigers travelled to Cambridge to face the Crimson. Princeton had not won on Harvard's home field since 1896, and 54,000 turned out to watch. Although both teams were unbeaten, Harvard was heavily favored to overcome the young Tiger team, and led 3-0 early in the game. On the 18 yard line, though, the Tigers outsmarted Harvard with a triple pass that set up Harry Crum's touchdown run, and went on to win 10-3. Grantland Rice wrote the next day, "Crimson shadows around Cambridge way were thicker tonight than the Chinese wall and as deep as the darkness of Stygia itself..." [7]

At the Polo Grounds, Cornell beat Dartmouth, with the Big Red overcoming the Big Green, 23-0. In Boston, Baylor lost to Boston College, 33-0.

In Seattle, California (7-0-0) faced Washington (5-0-0) in a battle of unbeatens, and handed the Huskies their first defeat, 45-7.

Iowa beat Minnesota 28-14, and Michigan beat Wisconsin 13-6; Drake beat Colorado State, 19-6 Vanderbilt beat Kentucky 9-0 North Carolina beat VMI 9-7 at Richmond.

November 18 North Carolina defeated Davidson 20-6. California defeated Nevada, 61-13.

November 25 Harvard won at Yale, 10-3. California closed its season with a 28-0 win at Stanford. Iowa closed its season at 7-0-0 with a win over Northwestern 37-3, Michigan won at Minnesota 16-7; Drake won at Mississippi State in Starkville, 48-6

November 30 was Thanksgiving Day in 1922. In Philadelphia, Cornell defeated Penn 6-3. In Dallas, Baylor defeated SMU, 24-0, to win the Southwest Conference title. The following week, Baylor lost to the Haskell Indians team, 21-20. North Carolina closed its season with a 10-7 win at Virginia, to finish at 9-1-0. Vanderbilt beat Sewanee, 26-0, to close at 8-0-1.

Rose Bowl

Though it had a record of 9-1-0 overall, USC was actually the fourth best team in Pacific Coast Conference play, behind California, Oregon and Washington, having been defeated by PCC champion California. Penn State had won its first five games, then only one of the next five, and had a 6-3-1 record at season's end. USC defeated Penn State 14-3.

Other Bowls

National championship

Three different "retro polls", taken years later and based on opinions drawn from historical research, reached different conclusions. The Helms Athletic Foundation, founded in 1936, declared retroactively that Cornell University (8-0-0) was the best, while the College Football Researchers' Association (CFRA) recognized shared between Drake University (7-0-0) and Princeton University (8-0-0); and the National Championship Foundation (NCF) cited the University of California (9-0-0) as best.[8] The Princeton team was dubbed the "team of destiny" by Grantland Rice after defeating Chicago in the first game nationally broadcast on radio.[9] Today, college football on radio is common for nearly every game in every division.

The other unbeaten and untied team was the University of Iowa (7-0-0), which canceled its game with unbeaten Drake University that year. Other teams that had no defeats in 1922 were West Virginia University (10-0-1), Vanderbilt University (8-0-1), the University of Michigan (6-0-1), and the United States Military Academy (Army), which had an 8-0-2 record. Clyde Berryman retroactively selected Vanderbilt as a national champion, which tied Michigan.[10]

Conference standings

The following is a potentially incomplete list of conference standings:
1922 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Iowa + 5 0 0     7 0 0
Michigan + 4 0 0     6 0 1
Chicago + 4 0 1     5 1 1
Wisconsin 2 2 1     4 2 1
Minnesota 2 3 1     3 3 1
Illinois 2 4 0     2 5 0
Northwestern 1 3 1     3 3 1
Ohio State 1 4 0     3 4 0
Indiana 0 2 1     1 4 2
Purdue 0 3 1     1 5 1
  • + – Conference co-champions
1922 Missouri Valley football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Nebraska + 5 0 0     7 1 0
Drake + 4 0 0     7 0 0
Kansas State 3 1 2     5 1 2
Missouri 4 3 0     5 3 0
Iowa State 2 4 0     2 6 0
Oklahoma 1 2 2     2 3 3
Grinnell 1 3 0     3 4 1
Kansas 1 3 1     3 3 1
Washington (MO) 0 5 1     1 5 1
  • + – Conference co-champions
1922 PCC football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
California $ 4 0 0     9 0 0
Oregon 3 0 1     6 1 1
Washington 4 1 1     6 1 1
USC 3 1 0     10 1 0
Oregon Agricultural 1 3 0     3 4 0
Stanford 1 3 0     4 5 0
Washington State 1 5 0     2 5 0
Idaho 0 4 0     3 5 0
  • $ – Conference champion
  • Selected as Rose Bowl representative
1922 Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Utah $ 5 0 0     7 1 0
Colorado State 5 1 1     5 2 1
Denver 3 1 1     6 1 1
Utah State 3 2 0     5 4 0
Colorado College 2 2 1     3 3 1
Colorado 1 3 0     4 4 0
BYU 1 4 0     1 5 0
Wyoming 1 6 0     0 8 0
Montana State 0 1 0     0 1 0
  • $ – Conference champion
1922 Southern Conference football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Vanderbilt* + 5 0 0     8 0 1
North Carolina + 5 0 0     9 1 0
Georgia Tech + 4 0 0     7 2 0
Virginia Tech 3 0 0     8 1 1
Florida 2 0 0     7 2 0
Auburn 2 1 0     8 2 0
Tennessee 3 2 0     8 2 0
Alabama 3 2 1     6 3 1
Virginia 1 1 1     4 4 1
Mississippi A&M 2 3 0     3 4 2
Kentucky 1 2 0     6 3 0
Clemson 1 2 0     5 4 0
Washington and Lee 1 2 0     5 3 1
Maryland 1 2 0     4 5 1
LSU 1 2 0     3 7 0
Georgia 1 3 1     5 4 1
Tulane 1 4 0     4 4 0
South Carolina 0 2 0     5 4 0
Ole Miss 0 2 0     4 5 1
NC State 0 5 0     4 6 0
  • + – Conference co-champions
  • * – co-member of SIAA

Awards and honors

All-Americans

The consensus All-America team included:
Position Name Height Weight (lbs.) Class Hometown Team
QB Gordon Locke 5'10" 165 Jr. Denison, Iowa Iowa
HB Harry Kipke 5'11" 155 Jr. Lansing, Michigan Michigan
HB Eddie Kaw 5'10" 168 Sr. Houston, Texas Cornell
FB John Webster Thomas Jr. Ocheyedan, Iowa Chicago
E Harold Muller 6'0" 180 Sr. Dunsmuir, California California
T John Thurman 6'1" 225 Sr. Penn
G Charles Hubbard Jr. Harvard
C Edgar Garbisch 6'0" 185 So. Washington, Pennsylvania Army
G Frank Schwab 5'11" 195 Sr. Saltsburg, Pennsylvania Lafayette
T Herb Treat 6'0" 190 Somerville, Massachusetts Princeton
E Wendell Taylor Sr. Navy

Statistical leaders

  • Team scoring most points: California, 398 (including mid majors, King College, 498)
  • Team giving up least points: Vanderbilt, 1.8 per game

References

  1. ^ http://www.jhowell.net/cf/cf1922.htm
  2. ^
  3. ^ "New Rule." Appleton Post Crescent [Appleton, Wisconsin] 23 Sept. 1922: 9.
  4. ^ Michael Oriard, King Football: Sport and Spectacle (UNC Press 2004), p41
  5. ^ "Princeton Gets Revenge Defeating Chicago, 21-18," Decatur (Ill.) Daily Review, Oct. 29, 1922, p6.
  6. ^ "Bears Tear Through Trojan Defense in the Final Quarter," Oakland Tribune, Oct. 29, 1922, p. 1-D
  7. ^ Grantland Rice, "Tiger Gets Good Grip on John Harvard's Flanks and Wins 10-3," Syracuse Herald, Nov. 12, 1922, p13
  8. ^ The 2001 ESPN Information Please Sports Almanac (Hyperion ESPN Books, 2000), p153
  9. ^
  10. ^
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.