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1939 St. Louis Cardinals season

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Title: 1939 St. Louis Cardinals season  
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Subject: List of National League pennant winners, Pepper Martin, List of St. Louis Cardinals seasons, List of St. Louis Cardinals managers, List of St. Louis Cardinals Opening Day starting pitchers
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1939 St. Louis Cardinals season

Template:MLB yearly infobox-pre1969

The 1939 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 58th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 48th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 92-61 during the season and finished 2nd in the National League.

Regular season

Season summary

Shortly after the end of the 1938 season, owner Sam Breadon appointed former reserve Cardinals outfielder Ray Blades as manager. He had managed many of the organization's top young players in Columbus, Ohio, and Rochester, New York.

A feisty skipper, Blades guided the Cardinals back into the pennant race. The Cincinnati Reds took over first place on May 26 and never fell back. The Cards seized second place at midseason and played at a .708 clip in the final 65 games-including a 29-6 record at home the second half-but never could catch the Reds.

The Redbirds made Cincinnati work down the stretch, though. They took two games from the Reds with the third of the three-game series washed out as a tie, and that pulled the Cards to only 3 and a half games back. Twice the Cardinals drew a game closer in September.

An old trade haunted the Cards: Paul Derringer, a former St. Louis farmhand, went 25-7 for the Reds. That record included a 5-3 victory in September that clinched the pennant for the Reds.

The best offense in the league was at least partially responsible for the Cardinals' dramatic turn. They led the NL in runs and made the most of their speed to head the league in doubles and triples. Their .294 team batting average was 16 points higher than anyone else's.

The trade that sent Dizzy Dean to the Chicago Cubs actually paid some dividens. Curt Davis, one of the two pitchers picked up in the deal, led the Redbirds' staff in almost every category. Clyde Shoun, the other ex-Cub, worked a team-high 51 games out of the bullpen. With rookie Mort Cooper winning 12 games and working more than 200 innings, the Cards pitchers posted the league's second-best ERA.

Season standings

National League W L GB Pct.
Cincinnati Reds 97 57 -- .630
St. Louis Cardinals 92 61 4.5 .601
Brooklyn Dodgers 84 69 12.5 .549
Chicago Cubs 84 70 13 .545
New York Giants 77 74 18.5 .510
Pittsburgh Pirates 68 85 28.5 .444
Boston Bees 63 88 32.5 .417
Philadelphia Phillies 45 106 50.5 .298

Roster

1939 St. Louis Cardinals
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Davis, CurtCurt Davis 49 248 22 16 3.63 70

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Shoun, ClydeClyde Shoun 53 3 1 9 3.76 50
Andrews, NateNate Andrews 11 1 2 0 6.75 6

Awards and honors

Cardinals in the 1939 All-Star Game

Farm system

Notes

References

  • 1939 St. Louis Cardinals
  • 1939 St. Louis Cardinals team page at www.baseball-almanac.com
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