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1968 Summer Paralympics

III Paralympic Games
Host city Tel Aviv, Israel[1]
Nations participating 28
Athletes participating 750
Events 181 in 10 sports
Opening ceremony November 4
Closing ceremony November 13
Officially opened by Yigal Allon
Paralympic Stadium Hebrew University Stadium
Summer:
Tokyo 1964 Heidelberg 1972  >
Winter:
Örnsköldsvik 1976  >

The 1968 Summer Paralympics (International Stoke Mandeville Games Federation (ISMGF), they were known as the 17th International Stoke Mandeville Games at the time.[2] The games were originally planned to be held alongside the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City, but in 1966, the Mexican government decided against it due to difficulties.[3] The Israeli government offered to host the games in Tel Aviv, a suggestion that was accepted.

The opening ceremony took place in the Hebrew University stadium at the Givat Ram campus in Jerusalem and the games actually took place in Ramat Gan, near Tel Aviv, at the Israel Sports Center for the Disabled. The closing ceremony took place in the Tel Aviv Trade Center. Therefore, these games were the first in Paralympic history to not be held concurrently with the Olympic Games.

Contents

  • Sports 1
  • Medal table 2
  • Participating delegations 3
  • References 4

Sports

Lawn bowls was included in the program for the first time. In wheelchair basketball, a women's team event was added, as was a 100 m wheelchair race for men in athletics.[4]

Medal table

The top ten listed NOCs by number of gold medals are listed below. The host nation, Israel, is highlighted.

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 United States 33 27 39 99
2 Great Britain 29 20 20 69
3 Israel 18 21 23 62
4 Australia 15 16 7 38
5 France 13 10 9 32
6 West Germany 12 12 11 35
7 Italy 12 10 17 39
8 Netherlands 12 4 4 20
9 Argentina 10 10 10 30
10 South Africa 9 10 7 26

Participating delegations

Twenty-eight delegations took part in the Tel Aviv Paralympics.[5]

Having made its Paralympic Games début four years earlier, South Africa continued to compete at the Paralympics, by sending a delegation to the Tel Aviv Games. It was, at the time, banned from the Olympic Games due to its policy of apartheid, but it was not banned from the Paralympics until 1980.[6][7]

References

  1. ^ Although officially called the Tel Aviv Paralympics, the opening ceremony was conducted in Jerusalem and the games actually took place in Ramat Gan.
  2. ^ Summer Games Governance 1960 to 1992. International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation. Retrieved on 2011-05-07.
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^ "'The Netherlands against Apartheid' - 1970s", International Institute of Social History
  7. ^ South Africa at the Paralympics, International Paralympic Committee
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