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1974 Florida Gators football team

 

1974 Florida Gators football team

The Florida Gators football team represents the University of Florida in the sport of American football. The University of Florida fielded its first official varsity football team in the fall of 1906, and has fielded a team every season since then, with the exception of 1943. During the 1970s, the Gators competed in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Southeastern Conference (SEC), and played their home games at Florida Field on the university's Gainesville, Florida campus.

This article includes a game-by-game list of the Florida Gators' ten football seasons from 1970 to 1979. During the 1970s, the Gators were coached by Douglas A. "Doug" Dickey (1970–1978) and Charles B. "Charley" Pell (1979–1984). Dickey and Pell compiled an overall record of 58–53–3 (.522) during the decade.

Contents: 1970  · 1971  · 1972  · 1973  · 1974  · 1975  · 1976  · 1977  · 1978  · 1979


1970

1970
Conference Southeastern Conference
1970 record 7–4 (3–3 T-3rd SEC)
Head coach Doug Dickey
Offensive coordinator Jimmy Dunn
Defensive coordinator Doug Knotts
Captain Mike Kelley
Donny Williams
Home stadium Florida Field

Season overview

The 1970 college football season was Florida alumnus Doug Dickey's first of nine as the new head coach of the Florida Gators football team. Dickey had been the starting quarterback for the Gators under coach Bob Woodruff in 1952 and 1953, and had previously served as the head coach of the Tennessee Volunteers before returning to his alma mater in 1970. Dickey's 1970 Florida Gators finished with a 7–4 overall record and a 3–3 record in the Southeastern Conference (SEC), tying for third among ten SEC teams.[1]

Schedule and results

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result
9–12–1970 Duke* #15 Gator Bowl StadiumJacksonville, Florida W 21–19  
9–19–1970 Mississippi State #14 Florida FieldGainesville, Florida W 34–13  
9–26–1970 Alabama #13 Denny StadiumTuscaloosa, Alabama L 15–46  
10–3–1970 North Carolina State* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 14–6  
10–10–1970 Florida State* Doak Campbell StadiumTallahassee, Florida W 38–27  
10–17–1970 Richmond* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 20–0  
10–24–1970 #11 Tennessee Neyland StadiumKnoxville, Tennessee ABC L 7–38  
10–31–1970 #12 Auburn Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida (Homecoming) L 14–63  
11–7–1970 Georgia Gator Bowl Stadium • Jacksonville, Florida ABC W 24–17  
11–14–1970 Kentucky Tampa StadiumTampa, Florida W 24–13  
11–28–1970 Miami* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida L 13–14  
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game.


1971

1971
Conference Southeastern Conference
1971 record 4–7 (1–6 T-8th SEC)
Head coach Doug Dickey
Offensive coordinator Jimmy Dunn
Defensive coordinator Doug Knotts
Captain Harvin Clark
Tommy Durrance
John Reaves
Home stadium Florida Field

Season overview

The 1971 college football season was Doug Dickey's second as the head coach of the Florida Gators football team. Dickey's 1971 Florida Gators finished with a 4–7 overall record and a 1–6 record in the Southeastern Conference (SEC), tying for eighth among ten SEC teams.[1]

The season ended on a controversial note. With the Gators leading the Miami Hurricanes 45–8 late in the fourth quarter, Dickey agreed to permit the Gators defense to allow the Hurricanes to score, thus returning the ball to the Gators offense. Dubbed the "Florida Flop" or "Gator Flop," the move enabled senior quarterback John Reaves to break the NCAA career passing yardage record in his last college game. After the game, Miami coach Fran Curci was so angry that he refused to shake Dickey's hand, and several Gators jumped in the pool at the Orange Bowl's east end zone used by the Miami Dolphins' live mascot, Flipper.[2]

Schedule and results

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result
9–11–1971 Duke* Tampa StadiumTampa, Florida L 6–12  
9–18–1971 Mississippi State Verterans Memorial StadiumJackson, Mississippi L 10–13  
9–25–1971 #8 Alabama Florida FieldGainesville, Florida L 0–38  
10–2–1971 #12 Tennessee Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida L 13–20  
10–9–1971 #16 Louisiana State Tiger StadiumBaton Rouge, Louisiana L 7–48  
10–16–1971 #19 Florida State* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 17–15  
10–23–1971 Maryland* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida (Homecoming) W 27–23  
10–30–1971 #5 Auburn Cliff Hare StadiumAuburn, Alabama L 7–40  
11–6–1971 #7 Georgia Gator Bowl StadiumJacksonville, Florida L 7–49  
11–13–1971 Kentucky Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 35–24  
11–27–1971 Miami* Orange Bowl StadiumMiami, Florida          W 45–16  
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game.


1972

1972
Conference Southeastern Conference
1972 record 5–5–1 (3–3–1 6th SEC)
Head coach Doug Dickey
Offensive coordinator Jimmy Dunn
Defensive coordinator Doug Knotts
Captain Fred Abbott
Home stadium Florida Field

Season overview

The 1972 college football season was the third for Doug Dickey as the head coach of the Florida Gators football team. Dickey's 1972 Florida Gators finished with a 5–5–1 overall record and a 3–3–1 Southeastern Conference (SEC) record, tying for sixth among ten SEC teams.[1]

Schedule and results

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result
9–23–1972 Southern Methodist* Tampa StadiumTampa, Florida L 14–21  
9–30–1972 Mississippi State Florida FieldGainesville, Florida W 28–13  
10–7–1972 #13 Florida State* Doak Campbell StadiumTallahassee, Florida W 42–13  
10–14–1972 #3 Alabama Denny StadiumTuscaloosa, Alabama L 7–24  
10–21–1972 Mississippi Hemingway StadiumOxford, Mississippi W 16–0  
11–4–1972 #11 Auburn Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida L 20–26  
11–11–1972 Georgia Gator Bowl StadiumJacksonville, Florida ABC L 7–10  
11–18–1972 Kentucky Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida (Homecoming) W 40–0  
11–25–1972 #8 Louisiana State Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida T 3–3  
12–2–1972 Miami* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 17–6  
12–9–1972 #16 North Carolina* Gator Bowl Stadium • Jacksonville, Florida L 24–28  
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game.

1973

1973
Tangerine Bowl, L 7–16 v. Miami (Ohio)
Conference Southeastern Conference
Ranking
Coaches #20
1973 record 7–5 (3–4 T-5th SEC)
Head coach Doug Dickey
Offensive coordinator Jimmy Dunn
Defensive coordinator Doug Knotts
Captain David Hitchcock
Vince Kendrick
Home stadium Florida Field

Season overview

The 1973 college football season was Doug Dickey's fourth as the Florida Gators football team's head coach. Dickey's 1973 Florida Gators finished with a 7–5 overall record and a 3–4 Southeastern Conference (SEC) record, tying for fifth among ten SEC teams.[1]

The Tangerine Bowl was moved up the Turnpike from Orlando to Gainesville as the then 17,000-seat Citrus Bowl was too small to accommodate the Florida crowd. The fans were greeted by a record cold snap, with gametime temperatures at 25 degrees Fahrenheit (-4 degrees Celsius); the cold weather benefited the visiting Miami (Ohio) team which won 16-7.

Schedule and results

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result
9–15–1973 Kansas State* #14 Florida FieldGainesville, Florida W 21–10  
9–22–1973 Southern Mississippi* #15 Tampa StadiumTampa, Florida W 14–13  
9–29–1973 Mississippi State #16 Veterans Memorial StadiumJackson, Mississippi L 12–33  
10–6–1973 #10 Louisiana State Tiger StadiumBaton Rouge, Louisiana L 3–24  
10–13–1973 #3 Alabama Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida L 14–35  
10–20–1973 Mississippi Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida (Homecoming) L 10–13  
11–3–1973 #19 Auburn Cliff Hare StadiumAuburn, Alabama W 12–8  
11–10–1973 Georgia Gator Bowl StadiumJacksonville, Florida ABC W 11–10  
11–17–1973 Kentucky Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 20–18  
11–24–1973 Miami* Orange Bowl StadiumMiami, Florida W 14–7  
12–1–1973 Florida State* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 49–0  
12–22–1973 #15 Miami (Ohio)* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida (Tangerine Bowl) MTN L 7–16  
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game.


1974

1974
Sugar Bowl, L 10–13 v. Nebraska
Conference Southeastern Conference
Ranking
Coaches #12
AP #15
1974 record 8–4 (3–3 T-4th SEC)
Head coach Doug Dickey
Offensive coordinator Jimmy Dunn
Offensive scheme Wishbone
Defensive coordinator Doug Knotts
Captain Lee McGriff
Ralph Ortega
Home stadium Florida Field

Season overview

The 1974 college football season was Doug Dickey's fifth as the head coach of the Florida Gators football team. Dickey's 1974 Florida Gators finished with an 8–4 overall record and a 3–3 record in the Southeastern Conference (SEC), tying for fourth among ten SEC teams.[1] Powered by a strong backfield that included Tony Green and Jimmy DuBose, Dickey employed the wishbone offense for the first season in the Gators' history.[3]

Schedule and results

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result
9–14–1974 California* Florida FieldGainesville, Florida W 21–17  
9–21–1974 #14 Maryland* Tampa StadiumTampa, Florida W 17–10  
9–28–1974 Mississippi State Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 29–13  
10–5–1974 Louisiana State #13 Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 24–14  
10–12–1974 Vanderbilt #8 Dudley FieldNashville, Tennessee L 10–24  
10–19–1974 Florida State* #14 Doak Campbell StadiumTallahassee, Florida W 24–14  
10–26–1974 Duke* #12 Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida (Homecoming) W 30–13  
11–2–1974 #5 Auburn #11 Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida ABC W 25–14  
11–9–1974 Georgia #6 Gator Bowl StadiumJacksonville, Florida L 16–17  
11–16–1974 Kentucky #9 Commonwealth StadiumLexington, Kentucky ABC L 24–41  
11–30–1974 Miami* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 31–7  
12–31–1974 #8 Nebraska* #18 Tulane StadiumNew Orleans, La. (Sugar Bowl) ABC L 10–13  
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game.

1975

1975
Gator Bowl, L 0–13 v. Maryland
Conference Southeastern Conference
1975 record 9–3 (5–1 T-2nd SEC)
Head coach Doug Dickey
Offensive coordinator Jimmy Dunn
Offensive scheme Wishbone
Defensive coordinator Doug Knotts
Captain Jimmy DuBose
Sammy Green
Home stadium Florida Field

Season overview

The 1975 college football season was Doug Dickey's sixth and most successful season as the head coach of the Florida Gators football team. Dickey's 1975 Florida Gators finished with a 9–3 overall record and a 5–1 Southeastern Conference (SEC) record, tying for second among ten SEC teams.[1]

Schedule and results

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result
9–13–1975 Southern Methodist* #19 Florida FieldGainesville, Florida W 40–14  
9–20–1975 North Carolina State* #13 Carter-Finley StadiumRaleigh, North Carolina L 7–8  
9–27–1975 Mississippi State #19 Veterans Memorial StadiumJackson, Mississippi W 27–10  
10–4–1975 Louisiana State #20 Tiger StadiumBaton Rouge, Louisiana W 34–6  
10–11–1975 Vanderbilt #18 Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 35–0  
10–18–1975 Florida State* #14 Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 34–8  
10–25–1975 Duke* #12 Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida (Homecoming) W 24–16  
11–1–1975 Auburn #11 Jordan-Hare StadiumAuburn, Alabama W 31–14  
11–8–1975 Georgia #11 Gator Bowl StadiumJacksonville, Florida ABC L 7–10  
11–15–1975 Kentucky #14 Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 48–7  
11–29–1975 Miami* #13 Orange Bowl StadiumMiami, Florida W 15–11  
12–29–1975 #17 Maryland* #13 Gator Bowl Stadium • Jacksonville, Fla. (Gator Bowl) CBS L 0–13  
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game.


1976

1976
Sun Bowl, L 14–37 v. Texas A&M
Conference Southeastern Conference
1976 record 8–4 (4–2 4th SEC)
Head coach Doug Dickey
Offensive coordinator Jimmy Dunn
Offensive scheme Wishbone
Defensive coordinator Doug Knotts
Captain Darrell Carpenter
Alvin Cowens
Jimmy Fisher
Home stadium Florida Field

Season overview

The 1976 college football season was the seventh for Doug Dickey as the head coach of the Florida Gators football team. Dickey's 1976 Florida Gators finished with an 8–4 overall record and a 4–2 record in the Southeastern Conference (SEC), placing fourth among ten SEC teams.[1]

Schedule and results

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result
9–11–1976 North Carolina* #18 Tampa StadiumTampa, Florida L 21–24  
9–18–1976 Houston* Florida FieldGainesville, Florida W 49–14  
9–25–1976 Mississippi State Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 34–30  
10–2–1976 #11 Louisiana State #19 Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 28–23  
10–16–1976 Florida State* #12 Doak Campbell StadiumTallahassee, Florida W 33–26  
10–23–1976 Tennessee #11 Neyland StadiumKnoxville, Tennessee W 20–18  
10–30–1976 Auburn #12 Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 24–19  
11–6–1976 #7 Georgia #10 Gator Bowl StadiumJacksonville, Florida ABC L 27–41  
11–13–1976 Kentucky #15 Commonwealth StadiumLexington, Kentucky L 9–28  
11–20–1976 Rice* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida (Homecoming) W 50–22  
11–27–1976 Miami* Citrus BowlOrlando, Florida W 19–10  
1–2–1977 #10 Texas A&M* Sun Bowl StadiumEl Paso, Texas (Sun Bowl) CBS L 14–37  
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game.

1977

1977
Conference Southeastern Conference
1977 record 6–4–1 (3–3 5th SEC)
Head coach Doug Dickey
Offensive coordinator Jimmy Dunn
Offensive scheme Wishbone
Defensive coordinator Doug Knotts
Captain Wes Chandler
Scott Hutchinson
Charlie Williams
Home stadium Florida Field

Season overview

The 1977 college football season was Doug Dickey's eighth as the head coach of the Florida Gators football team. Dickey's 1977 Florida Gators finished with a 6–4–1 overall record and a 3–3 Southeastern Conference (SEC) record, placing fifth among ten SEC teams.[1]

Schedule and results

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result
9–17–1977 Rice* #19 Rice StadiumHouston, Texas W 48–3  
9–24–1977 #12 Mississippi State #13 Veterans Memorial StadiumJackson, Mississippi ABC W 24–22  
10–1–1977 Louisiana State #9 Tiger StadiumBaton Rouge, Louisiana L 14–36  
10–8–1977 #15 Pittsburgh* #20 Florida FieldGainesville, Florida T 17–17  
10–22–1977 Tennessee #19 Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 27–17  
10–29–1977 Auburn #18 Jordan-Hare StadiumAuburn, Alabama L 14–29  
11–5–1977 Georgia Gator Bowl StadiumJacksonville, Florida ABC W 22–17  
11–12–1977 #7 Kentucky Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida L 7–14  
11–19–1977 Utah* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida (Homecoming) W 38–29  
11–26–1977 Miami* Orange Bowl StadiumMiami, Florida W 31–14  
12–3–1977 #19 Florida State* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida ABC L 9–37  
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game.


1978

1978
Conference Southeastern Conference
1978 record 4–7 (3–3 T-4th SEC)
Head coach Doug Dickey
Defensive coordinator Doug Knotts
Captain Mike DuPree
Don Swafford
Home stadium Florida Field

Season overview

The 1978 college football season was Doug Dickey's ninth and last year as the head coach of the Florida Gators football team. Dickey's 1978 Florida Gators finished with a 4–7 overall record and a 3–3 Southeastern Conference (SEC) record, tying for fourth among ten SEC teams.[1] After leaving Florida, Doug Dickey later became the long-time athletic director of the University of Tennessee's Volunteers sports program, and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 2003.[4]

Schedule and results

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result
9–16–1978 Southern Methodist* Citrus BowlOrlando, Florida L 25–35  
9–30–1978 Mississippi State Florida FieldGainesville, Florida W 34–0  
10–7–1978 #11 Louisiana State Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida L 21–34  
10–14–1978 #7 Alabama Bryant-Denny StadiumTuscaloosa, Alabama L 12–23  
10–21–1978 U.S. Military Academy* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida (Homecoming) W 31–7  
10–28–1978 Georgia Tech* Grant FieldAtlanta, Georgia ABC L 13–17  
11–4–1978 Auburn Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida W 31–7  
11–11–1978 #11 Georgia Gator Bowl StadiumJacksonville, Florida L 22–24  
11–18–1978 Kentucky Commonwealth StadiumLexington, Kentucky W 18–16  
11–25–1978 Florida State* Doak Campbell StadiumTallahassee, Florida L 21–38  
12–2–1978 Miami* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida L 21–22  
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game.

1979

1979
Conference Southeastern Conference
1979 record 0–10–1 (0–6 10th SEC)
Head coach Charley Pell
Offensive coordinator Denny Aldrich
Defensive coordinator Dwight Adams
Captain Bill Bennek
Nap Green
Chuck Hatch
Home stadium Florida Field

Season overview

The 1979 college football season was Charley Pell's first of six as the new head coach of the Florida Gators football team. Pell arrived in Gainesville with a new plan for building the Gators football program—new offensive and defensive schemes, new assistant coaches, a new attitude and new boosters fund-raising model to support the program and improve the stadium and training facilities. Pell's plan would produce many on-the-field victories over the next five years, but his first campaign as the Gators coach produced the most losses in any single season in Gators football history, ending with a winless 0–10–1 overall record and a 0–6 record in the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and placing dead last among ten SEC teams.[1]

Schedule and results

Date Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result
9–15–1979 #13 Houston* Jeppesen StadiumHouston, Texas L 10–14  
9–22–1979 Georgia Tech* Florida FieldGainesville, Florida T 7–7  
9–29–1979 Mississippi State Veterans Memorial StadiumJackson, Mississippi L 10–24  
10–6–1979 #17 Louisiana State Tiger StadiumBaton Rouge, Louisiana L 3–20  
10–13–1979 #2 Alabama Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida L 0–40  
10–27–1979 Tulsa* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida (Homecoming) L 10–20  
11–3–1979 #20 Auburn Jordan-Hare StadiumAuburn, Alabama L 13–19  
11–10–1979 Georgia Gator Bowl StadiumJacksonville, Florida ABC L 10–33  
11–17–1979 Kentucky Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida L 3–31  
11–24–1979 #5 Florida State* Florida Field • Gainesville, Florida ABC L 16–27  
12–1–1979 Miami* Orange Bowl StadiumMiami, Florida L 24–30  
*Non-conference game. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game.

See also

American football portal
College football portal
Florida portal

References

Bibliography

  • 2010 Southeastern Conference Football Media Guide, Florida Year-by-Year Records, Southeastern Conference, Birmingham, Alabama, p. 60 (2010).
  • 2012 Florida Football Media Guide, University Athletic Association, Gainesville, Florida, pp. 107–116 (2012).
  • Carlson, Norm, University of Florida Football Vault: The History of the Florida Gators, Whitman Publishing, LLC, Atlanta, Georgia (2007). ISBN 0-7948-2298-3.
  • Golenbock, Peter, Go Gators! An Oral History of Florida's Pursuit of Gridiron Glory, Legends Publishing, LLC, St. Petersburg, Florida (2002). ISBN 0-9650782-1-3.
  • Hairston, Jack, Tales from the Gator Swamp: A Collection of the Greatest Gator Stories Ever Told, Sports Publishing, LLC, Champaign, Illinois (2002). ISBN 1-58261-514-4.
  • McCarthy, Kevin M., ISBN 978-0-7385-0559-6.
  • McEwen, Tom, The Gators: A Story of Florida Football, The Strode Publishers, Huntsville, Alabama (1974). ISBN 0-87397-025-X.
  • Nash, Noel, ed., The Gainesville Sun Presents The Greatest Moments in Florida Gators Football, Sports Publishing, Inc., Champaign, Illinois (1998). ISBN 1-57167-196-X.
  • Proctor, Samuel, & Wright Langley, Gator History: A Pictorial History of the University of Florida, South Star Publishing Company, Gainesville, Florida (1986). ISBN 0-938637-00-2.

External links

  • College Football Data Warehouse, Florida Yearly Results: 1970–1974. Retrieved September 12, 2012.
  • College Football Data Warehouse, Florida Yearly Results: 1975–1979. Retrieved September 16, 2012.
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