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1974 In Spaceflight

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1974 In Spaceflight

In 1974 Mariner 10 visited Mercury that saw a spacecraft that visited Mercury for the first and last time in the 20th century.



Launches

This is a list of spaceflights launched in 1974.

Date and time
(UTC)
Rocket Site LSP Payload Operator Orbit Function Decay
(UTC)
Outcome Remarks
5 January, 01:45 GMT[1] Aerobee 200A White Sands NASA NASA Sub-orbital Aeronomy/Ultraviolet astronomy 5 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 223 kilometres (139 mi)
8 January, 01:40 GMT[1] Aerobee 200A White Sands NASA NASA/NRL Sub-orbital Aeronomy/Ultraviolet astronomy 8 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 193 kilometres (120 mi)
12 January 19:12 GMT[1] Skylark El Arenosillo DFVLR H-GR-58 DLR Sub-orbital Astronomy 12 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 246 kilometres (153 mi)
12 January[1] R-36 LC-162/36, Baikonur RVSN DKh RVSN Sub-orbital ICBM test 12 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
15 January 20:00 GMT[1] Black Brant VC LC-36, White Sands NASA NASA Sub-orbital Solar research 15 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 234 kilometres (145 mi)
16 January, 02:00 GMT[1] Kappa 9M Kagoshima ISAS ISAS Sub-orbital Ionosphere and Solar research 16 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 360 kilometres (220 mi)
16 January 17:40 GMT[1] Nike Apache Wallops Island NASA NASA Sub-orbital Aeronomy 16 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 205 kilometres (127 mi)
16 January 18:13 GMT[1] Super Arcas Wallops Island NASA NASA Sub-orbital Ionosphere research 16 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 103 kilometres (64 mi)
16 January[1] Aerobee 200A White Sands NASA NASA Sub-orbital Solar research 16 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 250 kilometres (160 mi)
17 January, 02:37 GMT[1] Nike Tomahawk Poker Flat NASA NASA Sub-orbital Plasma research 17 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 298 kilometres (185 mi)
17 January, 02:37 GMT[1] Kosmos-3M LC-132/2, Plesetsk VKS Kosmos 628 (Tsiklon) MO SSSR LEO Navigation Still in orbit Successful
19 January, 01:38 GMT[1] Delta 2313 LC-17B, CCAFS Skynet 2A UK Ministry of Defence Intended: GSO
Achieved: LEO
Comms 25 January 1974 Failure Placed in incorrect orbit due to carrier rocket malfunction
19 January 11:34 GMT[1] Skua El Arenosillo RAE RAE Sub-orbital Ionosphere research 19 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 110 kilometres (68 mi)
19 January[1] Eridan ALFS, Kourou Sub-orbital Missile test 19 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 220 kilometres (140 mi)
20 January[1] R-36M LC-103, Baikonur RVSN POR RVSN Sub-orbital ICBM test 20 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
21 January, 02:39 GMT[1] Nike Tomahawk Poker Flat NASA NASA Sub-orbital Plasma research 21 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 298 kilometres (185 mi)
21 January 11:30 GMT[1] Skua 4 El Arenosillo RAE RAE Sub-orbital Ionosphere research 21 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 114 kilometres (71 mi)
22 January, 02:41 GMT[1] Nike Tomahawk Poker Flat NASA NASA Sub-orbital Plasma research 22 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 298 kilometres (185 mi)
22 January 11:00 GMT[1] Lambda-3H Area L, Kagoshima ISAS ISAS Sub-orbital X-ray astronomy 22 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 1,571 kilometres (976 mi)
8 January 16:45 GMT[1] Aerobee 200A White Sands NASA NASA Sub-orbital Solar research 22 January 1974 Successful Reached 238 kilometres (148 mi)
22 January[1] Minuteman I LF-06, Vandenberg AFB USAF USAF Sub-orbital ICBM test 22 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 1,300 kilometres (810 mi)
23 January 11:30 GMT[1] Skua El Arenosillo RAE RAE Sub-orbital Ionosphere research 23 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 106 kilometres (66 mi)
23 January 12:50 GMT[1] Black Brant VB Fort Churchill NRCC NRCC Sub-orbital Aeronomy/Ionosphere/Aurora research 23 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 208 kilometres (129 mi)
24 January 15:00 GMT[1] Voskhod Plesetsk Kosmos 629 (Zenit-2M) MOM LEO Recon 5 February 1974 Successful
25 January 11:30 GMT[1] Skua El Arenosillo RAE RAE Sub-orbital Ionosphere research 25 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 109 kilometres (68 mi)
25 January[1] UR-100N Baikonur Cosmodrome RVSN RVSN Sub-orbital ICBM test 25 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
26 January[1] Minuteman III LF-25, Vandenberg AFB USAF GT-24GB-1 USAF Sub-orbital ICBM test 26 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 1,300 kilometres (810 mi)
26 January[1] UR-100N Baikonur Cosmodrome RVSN RVSN Sub-orbital ICBM test 26 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
27 January 19:08 GMT[1] Nike Tomahawk Andoya NASA Ferdinand 35
(Polar 3)
NDRE Sub-orbital Aurora research 27 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 238 kilometres (148 mi)
30 January 11:00 GMT[1] Voskhod Plesetsk Kosmos 630 (Zenit-4MK) MOM LEO Recon 13 February 1974 Successful
30 January[1] SSBS BLB, Biscarosse DMA DMA Sub-orbital Missile test 30 January 1974 Successful Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
January[1] Vertikal' K65UP LC-107, Kapustin Yar RVSN RVSN Sub-orbital Ionosphere/Solar research January 1974 Successful Apogee: 1,500 kilometres (930 mi)
January[1] Athena Wallops Island Sandia USAF Sub-orbital Re-entry vehicle test January 1974 Successful Apogee: 200 kilometres (120 mi)
1 February, 06:30 GMT[1] JCR Area T, Tanegashima NASDA NASDA Sub-orbital Test flight 1 February 1974 Successful Apogee: 200 kilometres (120 mi)
4 February 14:40 GMT[1] Skylark 6AC LA-2SL, Woomera BAC BAC Sub-orbital Astronomy 4 February 1974 Successful Apogee: 197 kilometres (122 mi)
4 February[1] MR-UR-100 LC-177, Baikonur RVSN RVSN Sub-orbital ICBM test 4 February 1974 Successful Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
6 February, 00:34 GMT[1] Kosmos-3M LC-132/2, Plesetsk VKS Kosmos 631 (Tselina-O) MO SSSR LEO ELINT 3 October 1980 Successful
6 February 22:48 GMT[1] Black Brant IVB Andoya DLR DFVLR Sub-orbital Aurora research 6 February 1974 Successful Apogee: 548 kilometres (341 mi)
6 February[1] Polaris A3 Submarine, WTR US Navy US Navy Sub-orbital SLBM test 6 February 1974 Successful Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
6 February[1] Polaris A3 Submarine, WTR US Navy US Navy Sub-orbital SLBM test 6 February 1974 Successful Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
6 February[1] Polaris A3 Submarine, WTR US Navy US Navy Sub-orbital SLBM test 6 February 1974 Successful Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
6 February[1] Polaris A3 Submarine, WTR US Navy US Navy Sub-orbital SLBM test 6 February 1974 Successful Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
6 February[1] Polaris A3 Submarine, WTR US Navy US Navy Sub-orbital SLBM test 6 February 1974 Successful Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
9 February, 02:10 GMT[1] Aerobee 200A White Sands NASA NASA Sub-orbital Astronomy 9 February 1974 Successful Apogee: 186 kilometres (116 mi)
9 February, 06:30 GMT[1] LS-C Area T, Tanegashima NASDA LE-3 NASDA Sub-orbital Test flight 9 February 1974 Successful Apogee: 100 kilometres (62 mi)
11 February 13:48 GMT[1] Titan IIIE LC-41, CCAFS Boilerplate Viking NASA Intended: GSO Test carrier rocket 12 February 1974 Failure Upper stage turbopump malfunction
SPHINX NASA Intended: GSO Plasma research
3 July Soyuz (11A511) LC-1/5, Baikonur Soyuz 14 LEO, docked to Salyut 3 Manned orbital flight 19 July 1974 Successful
26 August Soyuz (11A511) LC-1/5, Baikonur Soyuz 15 LEO
Planned: docked to Salyut 3
Manned orbital flight 28 August 1974 Failure Failed to dock with Salyut 3
2 December Soyuz-U (11A511U) LC-1/5, Baikonur Soyuz 16 LEO Manned orbital flight 8 December 1974 Successful ASTP dress-rehearsal
First manned use of Soyuz-U launch vehicle


Deep Space Rendezvous

Date (GMT) Spacecraft Event Remarks
5 February Mariner 10 Flyby of Venus Gravity assist; Closest approach: 5,768 kilometres (3,584 mi)
10 February Mars 4 Flyby of Mars Closest approach: 2,200 kilometres (1,400 mi) (orbiter mission)
12 February Mars 5 Areocentric orbit injection
9 March Mars 7 Lander missed mars by 1,300 kilometres (810 mi)
12 March Mars 6 Lander lost a few seconds before anticipated landing
29 March Mariner 10 1st flyby of Mercury Closest approach: 703 kilometres (437 mi)
2 June Luna 22 Selenocentric orbit injection Photographic mission
21 September Mariner 10 2nd flyby of Mercury Closest approach: 48,069 kilometres (29,869 mi)
2 November Luna 23 Landed rough at Mare Crisium, the Moon Sample return mission
3 December Pioneer 11 Flyby of Jupiter Gravity assist; Closest approach: 42,960 kilometres (26,690 mi)

EVAs

Start Date/Time Duration End Time Spacecraft Crew Remarks
3 February
15:19
5 hours
19 minutes
20:38 Skylab
SLM-3
United StatesGerald P. Carr
United StatesEdward Gibson
Retrieved the final film from the solar observatory and photographed Kohoutek using an electronographic camera.

References

Generic references:
Spaceflight portal

Footnotes


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