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1984 New England Patriots season

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Title: 1984 New England Patriots season  
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Subject: Steve Grogan, 1984 NFL season, 1984 NFL Draft, History of the New England Patriots, List of New England Patriots seasons, List of New England Patriots starting quarterbacks
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1984 New England Patriots season

1984 New England Patriots season
Head coach Ron Meyer
Raymond Berry
General manager Patrick Sullivan
Owner Billy Sullivan
Home field Sullivan Stadium
Results
Record 9–7
Division place 2nd AFC East
Playoff finish did not qualify
Pro Bowlers G John Hannah
T Brian Holloway
LB Steve Nelson
LB Andre Tippett
AP All-Pros G John Hannah (2nd team)
Timeline
Previous season      Next season
< 1983      1985 >

The 1984 New England Patriots season was the team's 35th, and 25th in the National Football League. The Patriots finished the season with a record of nine wins and seven losses, and finished second in the AFC East division.

Head coach Ron Meyer, who had coached the Patriots for the previous two seasons, was fired halfway through the season. Meyer had angered several of his players with public criticism. After a 44-22 loss to Miami in Week 8, Meyer fired popular defensive coordinator Rod Rust. Meyer himself was fired by Patriots management shortly thereafter.[1]

The Patriots went outside the organization to hire Raymond Berry, who had been New England's receivers coach from 1978 to 1981 under coaches Chuck Fairbanks and Ron Erhardt. Berry had been working in the private sector in Medfield, MA, when the Patriots called him to replace Meyer. Berry's first order of business was to immediately rehire Rod Rust.

Under Berry's leadership, the Patriots won 4 of their last 8 games and finished the season with an 9-7 record. Berry's importance to the team was reflected less in his initial win-loss record than in the respect he immediately earned in the locker room - "Raymond Berry earned more respect in one day than Ron Meyer earned in three years," according to running back Tony Collins.[2]

Staff

New England Patriots 1984 staff
Front Office
  • President – Billy Sullivan
  • Executive Vice President – Chuck Sullivan
  • Vice President – Bucko Kilroy
  • General Manager – Patrick Sullivan
  • Director of Player Development – Dick Steinberg
  • Director of College Scouting – Joe Mendes
  • Director of Pro Scouting – Bill McPeak

Head Coaches

Offensive Coaches

  • Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks – Lew Erber
  • Offensive Backfield – Cleve Bryant
  • Receivers – Steve Endicott
  • Offensive Line – Bill Muir
 

Defensive Coaches

  • Defensive Coordinator – Rod Rust
  • Linebackers – Tommy Brasher
  • Linebackers – Steve Sidwell
  • Defensive Backs – Steve Walters

Special Teams Coaches

Strength and Conditioning

  • Strength and Conditioning – LeBaron Caruthers

Regular season

Schedule

Week Date Opponent Result Notes Attendance
1 September 2, 1984 at Buffalo Bills W 21–17 Steve Grogan threw two touchdowns
48,528
2 September 9, 1984 at Miami Dolphins L 28–7
66,083
3 September 16, 1984 Seattle Seahawks W 38–23 Patriots erased 23–0 gap
43,140
4 September 23, 1984 Washington Redskins L 26–10 Tony Eason's first start
60,503
5 September 30, 1984 at New York Jets W 28–21
68,978
6 October 7, 1984 at Cleveland Browns W 17–16
53,036
7 October 14, 1984 Cincinnati Bengals W 20–14
48,154
8 October 21, 1984 Miami Dolphins L 44–24 Ron Meyer fired following game
60,711
9 October 28, 1984 New York Jets W 30–20 Raymond Berry took over as coach
60,513
10 November 4, 1984 at Denver Broncos L 26–19
74,908
11 November 11, 1984 Buffalo Bills W 38–10
43,313
12 November 18, 1984 at Indianapolis Colts W 50–17 First trip to Indianapolis
60,009
13 November 22, 1984 at Dallas Cowboys L 20–17 Patriots' first Thanksgiving Day game
55,341
14 December 2, 1984 St. Louis Cardinals L 33–10
53,558
15 December 9, 1984 at Philadelphia Eagles L 27–17
41,581
16 December 16, 1984 Indianapolis Colts W 16–10
22,383

Notable Games

The Patriots behind two Steve Grogan touchdown throws raced to a 21-0 lead and withstood a second-half Bills comeback to win 21-17.

Grogan had a miserable day as he was intercepted four times; William Judson ran back one for a 60-yard touchdown. The Dolphins behind two Dan Marino scores won 28-7.

The first home game of the season ended Grogan's season as he failed to complete any of his four passes and Kenny Easley ran back his interception for a 25-yard touchdown. The Seahawks scored three touchdowns marred by a missed PAT. Tony Eason replaced Grogan with six minutes left in the first half and in the final minuite ran in a 25-yard touchdown. From there three Patriots backs rushed for 189 yards and three touchdowns and Eason tossed scores to Derrick Ramsey and Irving Fryar while Dave Krieg of the Seahawks was bullied into two interceptions. The 38-23 win remains the largest comeback in Patriots history.

Raymond Berry's first game as Patriots' head coach.

New York Jets at New England Patriots
1 234Total
Jets 10 1000 20
Patriots 0 61014 30
  • Source: Pro-Football-Reference.com


Standings

Template:1984 AFC East standings

Roster

New England Patriots 1984 roster
Quarterbacks

Running Backs

Wide Receivers

Tight Ends

Offensive Linemen

Defensive Linemen

Linebackers

Defensive Backs

Special Teams

References

Template:Navbox season by team

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