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1993 IAAF World Indoor Championships

4th IAAF World Indoor Championships
Host city Toronto, Canada
Date(s) March 12–14
Main stadium Skydome
Participation 537 athletes from
93 nations
Events 27 (+4 non-championship)

The 4th IAAF World Indoor Championships in Athletics were held at the Skydome in Toronto, Canada from March 12 to March 14, 1993. It was the last Indoor Championships to feature the 5,000 and 3,000 metres race walk events. In addition, it was the first Indoor Championships to include heptathlon and pentathlon, albeit as non-championship events. There were a total number of 537 athletes participated from 93 countries.

Contents

  • Results 1
    • Men 1.1
    • Women 1.2
  • Non-championship events 2
  • Medal table 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Results

Men

1989

| 1991 | 1993 | 1995 | 1997

Event Gold Silver Bronze
60 m
 Bruny Surin (CAN) 6.50
(CR)
 Frankie Fredericks (NAM) 6.51
(NR)
 Talal Mansour (QAT) 6.57
200 m
 James Trapp (USA) 20.63  Damien Marsh (AUS) 20.71  Kevin Little (USA) 20.72
400 m
 Butch Reynolds (USA) 45.26
(CR)
 Sunday Bada (NGR) 45.75  Darren Clark (AUS) 46.45
800 m
 Tom McKean (GBR) 1:47.29  Charles Nkazamyampi (BDI) 1:47.62  Nico Motchebon (GER) 1:48.15
1,500 m
 Marcus O'Sullivan (IRL) 3:45.00  David Strang (GBR) 3:45.30  Branko Zorko (CRO) 3:45.39
3,000 m
 Gennaro Di Napoli (ITA) 7:50.26  Eric Dubus (FRA) 7:50.57  Enrique Molina (ESP) 7:51.10
60 m hurdles
 Mark McKoy (CAN) 7.41
(CR)
 Colin Jackson (GBR) 7.43  Tony Dees (USA) 7.43
High jump
 Javier Sotomayor (CUB) 2.41  Patrik Sjöberg (SWE) 2.39  Steve Smith (GBR) 2.37
Pole vault
 Rodion Gataullin (RUS) 5.90  Grigoriy Yegorov (KAZ) 5.80  Jean Galfione (FRA) 5.80
Long jump
 Iván Pedroso (CUB) 8.23  Joe Greene (USA) 8.13  Jaime Jefferson (CUB) 7.98
Triple jump
 Pierre Camara (FRA) 17.59
(CR)
 Māris Bružiks (LAT) 17.36  Brian Wellman (BER) 17.27
Shot put
 Mike Stulce (USA) 21.27  Jim Doehring (USA) 21.08  Aleksandr Bagach (UKR) 20.63
5000 m walk
 Mikhail Shchennikov (RUS) 18:32.10  Robert Korzeniowski (POL) 18:35.91  Mikhail Orlov (RUS) 18:43.48
4x400 m relay
 United States (USA)
Darnell Hall
Brian Irvin
Jason Rouser
Mark Everett
3:04.20  Trinidad and Tobago (TRI)
Daziel Jules
Alvin Daniel
Neil de Silva
Ian Morris
3:07.02
(NR)
 Japan (JPN)
Masayoshi Kan
Seiji Inagaki
Yoshihiko Saito
Hiroyuki Hayashi
3:07.30

Women

1989

| 1991 | 1993 | 1995 | 1997

Event Gold Silver Bronze
60 m
 Gail Devers (USA) 6.95
(CR)
 Irina Privalova (RUS) 6.97  Zhanna Tarnopolskaya (UKR) 7.21
200 m
 Irina Privalova (RUS) 22.15
(CR)
 Melinda Gainsford (AUS) 22.73  Natalya Pomoshchnikova-Voronova (RUS) 22.90
400 m
 Sandie Richards (JAM) 50.93
(NR)
 Tatyana Alekseyeva (RUS) 51.03  Jearl Miles (USA) 51.37
800 m
 Maria Mutola (MOZ) 1:57.55
(CR)
 Svetlana Masterkova (RUS) 1:59.18  Joetta Clark (USA) 1:59.86
1,500 m
 Yekaterina Podkopayeva (RUS) 4:09.29  Violeta Beclea (ROU) 4:09.41  Sandra Gasser (SUI) 4:10.99
3,000 m
 Yvonne Murray (GBR) 8:50.55  Margareta Keszeg (ROU) 9:02.89  Lynn Jennings (USA) 9:03.78
60 m hurdles
 Julie Baumann (SUI) 7.86  LaVonna Martin (USA) 7.99  Patricia Girard-Léno (FRA) 8.01
High jump
 Stefka Kostadinova (BUL) 2.02  Heike Henkel (GER) 2.02  Inga Babakova (UKR) 2.00
Long jump
 Marieta Ilcu (ROU) 6.84  Susen Tiedtke (GER) 6.84  Inessa Kravets (UKR) 6.77
Triple jump
 Inessa Kravets (UKR) 14.47
(CR)
 Yolanda Chen (RUS) 14.36  Inna Lasovskaya (RUS) 14.35
Shot put
 Svetlana Krivelyova (RUS) 19.57  Stephanie Storp (GER) 19.37  Zhang Liuhong (CHN) 19.32
3000 m walk
 Yelena Nikolayeva (RUS) 11:49.73
(CR)
 Kerry Saxby-Junna (AUS) 11:53.82  Ileana Salvador (ITA) 11:55.35
4 x 400 m relay
 Jamaica
Deon Hemmings,
Beverly Grant,
Cathy Rattray-Williams,
Sandie Richards
3:32.32  United States
Trevaia Williams,
Terri Dendy,
Dyan Webber,
Natasha Kaiser-Brown
3:32.50 none none
  • The Russian 4 x 400 m relay team won the event and was awarded the gold medal, but was later disqualified when Marina Shmonina was found to have been doping.[3][2]

Non-championship events

Some events were contested without counting towards the total medal status. The 1600 metres medley relay consisted of four legs over 800 m, 200 m, 200 m and 400 m.

Games Gold Silver Bronze
Men's Heptathlon Dan O'Brien
 United States
6476 Mike Smith
 Canada
6279 Eduard Hämäläinen
 Belarus
6075
Women's Pentathlon Liliana Nastase
 Romania
4686 Urszula Włodarczyk
 Poland
4667 Birgit Clarius
 Germany
4641
Men's 1600 Metres
Medley Relay
 United States
Mark Everett,
James Trapp,
Kevin Little,
Butch Reynolds
3:15.10  Brazil
Gilmar dos Santos,
André da Silva,
Sidnei Telles,
Eronilde de Araujo
3:16.11  Canada
Freddie Williams,
Ricardo Greenidge,
Peter Ogilvie,
Mark Jackson
3:16.93
Women's 1600 Metres
Medley Relay
 United States
Joetta Clark,
Wendy Vereen,
Kim Batten,
Jearl Miles
3:45.90  Canada
Donalda Duprey,
Sonia Paquette,
Mame Twumasi,
Alanna Yakiwchuk
3:56.34 none none
  • Irina Belova (RUS) won the women's pentathlon and was awarded the gold medal, but was later disqualified when she was found to have been doping.[2][4]
  • The Russian women's 1600 meteres medley relay team won the event, but was later disqualified when Marina Shmonina was found to have been doping.[2]

Medal table

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Russia 6 4 3 13
2  United States 5 4 5 14
3  Great Britain 2 2 1 5
4  Cuba 2 0 1 3
5  Canada 2 0 0 2
 Jamaica 2 0 0 2
7  Romania 1 2 0 3
8  France 1 1 2 4
9  Ukraine 1 0 4 5
10  Italy 1 0 1 2
  Switzerland 1 0 1 2
12  Bulgaria 1 0 0 1
 Ireland 1 0 0 1
 Mozambique 1 0 0 1
15  Australia 0 3 1 4
 Germany 0 3 1 4
17  Burundi 0 1 0 1
 Kazakhstan 0 1 0 1
 Latvia 0 1 0 1
 Namibia 0 1 0 1
 Nigeria 0 1 0 1
 Poland 0 1 0 1
 Sweden 0 1 0 1
 Trinidad and Tobago 0 1 0 1
25  Bermuda 0 0 1 1
 China 0 0 1 1
 Japan 0 0 1 1
 Qatar 0 0 1 1
 Croatia 0 0 1 1
 Spain 0 0 1 1

See also

References

  1. ^ "Sporting Digest: Drugs in sport". The Independent. 13 April 1993. Retrieved 6 January 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d Istanbul 2012 - Notes on contents (PDF),  
  3. ^ Sport References: Marina Shmonina
  4. ^ Sports Reference - Irina Belova

External links

  • GBR Athletics
  • Athletics Australia
  • [2] (German)
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