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1995 in New Zealand

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Title: 1995 in New Zealand  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: 1995 in New Zealand, 1996 in New Zealand, 1997 in New Zealand, 1998 in New Zealand, 1994 in New Zealand
Collection: 1995 by Country, 1995 in New Zealand
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1995 in New Zealand

1995 in New Zealand
Decades:

Contents

  • Population 1
  • Incumbents 2
    • Regal and viceregal 2.1
    • Government 2.2
    • Opposition leaders 2.3
    • Main centre leaders 2.4
  • Events 3
  • Arts and literature 4
    • Music 4.1
      • New Zealand Music Awards 4.1.1
    • Performing arts 4.2
    • Radio and television 4.3
    • Film 4.4
    • Dance 4.5
    • Internet 4.6
  • Appointments and awards 5
  • Sport 6
    • Athletics 6.1
    • Horse racing 6.2
      • Harness racing 6.2.1
      • Thoroughbred racing 6.2.2
    • Rugby league 6.3
    • Shooting 6.4
    • Soccer 6.5
  • Births 7
    • January–June 7.1
    • July–December 7.2
  • Deaths 8
    • January–March 8.1
    • April–June 8.2
    • July–September 8.3
    • October–December 8.4
    • Full date unknown 8.5
  • References 9
  • See also 10

Population

  • Estimated population as of 31 December: 3,706,700[1]
  • Increase since 31 December 1994: 58,400 (1.60%)
  • Males per 100 Females: 97.3

Incumbents

Regal and viceregal

Government

The 44th New Zealand Parliament continued. Government was The National Party, led by Jim Bolger.

Opposition leaders

See: Category:Parliament of New Zealand, New Zealand elections

Main centre leaders

Events

  • April: The Cambridge Independent closes. The newspaper began as the Waikato Independent in 1904.[3]
  • 28 April: 13 polytech students and a Department of Conservation Worker die when a viewing platform Paparoa National Park. [1]
  • 9 June: Ansett Flight 703 crashes on approach to Palmerston North, killing 4 of 21 on board.[4] Passenger Reginald John Dixon was awarded the New Zealand Cross posthumously.

Arts and literature

See 1995 in art, 1995 in literature, Category:1995 books

Music

New Zealand Music Awards

Winners are shown first with nominees underneath.[5][6]

  • Album of the Year: Supergroove - Traction
    • The Mutton Birds - Salty
    • Dave Dobbyn - Twist
    • Head Like A Hole - Flik y'self off y'self
    • Shona Laing - Shona
  • Single of the Year: Purest FormMessage to My Girl
  • Best Male Vocalist: Dave DobbynTwist
    • David Kilgour
    • Greg Johnson
    • Jon Toogood
  • Best Female Vocalist: Fiona McDonald
    • Emma Paki
    • Stephanie Tauevihi
  • Best Group: Supergroove
    • The Mutton Birds
    • Headless Chickens
  • Most Promising Male Vocalist: Brent Milligan (Pumpkinhead)
    • Peter Daube (Bilge Festival)
    • Evan Woodruffe (Melon Twister)
  • Most Promising Female Vocalist: Sulata Foai
    • Chloe Reeves
    • Helen Goudge (Melon Twister)
  • Most Promising Group: Sisters Underground
  • International Achievement: Headless Chickens
    • Shihad
    • Crowded House
  • Best Video: Jo Fisher & Matt Noonan – "Can't Get Enough" (Supergroove)
    • Johnny Ogilvy - Cruise Control (Headless Chickens)
    • G Keith/ M Ringrose/ S McGlashen - George (Headless Chickens)
  • Best Producer: Karl Steven & Malcolm Welsford – Traction (Supergroove)
    • Neil Finn - Twist
    • Neil Finn - Greenstone
  • Best Engineer: Malcolm Welsford - Traction (Supergroove)
    • Paul Streekstra - Language
    • Nick Launay - Greenstone
  • Best Jazz Album: George Chisholm Quintet - Perfect Strangers
    • John Key - Strange Fruit
    • Urbanism - Urbanism
  • Best Classical Album: The NZ Symphony Orchestra - The Three Symphonies / Douglas Lilburn
    • Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra - NZ Music Volume 5
    • Dame Malvina Major - Christmastime
    • The New Zealand National Youth Choir - On Tour in North America '93
  • Best Country Album: Kevin Greaves – I'm Not Scared Of Women
    • Noel Parlane - Can I Count On You
    • Merv Pinny - Destiny
  • Best Folk Album: Windy City Strugglers - Windy City Strugglers
    • Paul Ubana Jones - A Change Of Season
    • Chris Priestley - Argentina To Invercargill
  • Best Gospel Album: Derek Lind – Stations
    • Sir Howard Morrison - Christmas Collection
    • Jules Riding - The Fisherman
  • Best Film Soundtrack: Once Were Warriors
    • Blood Brothers
    • Jesus Christ Superstar
  • Best Songwriter: Dave Dobbyn – Language
  • Best Cover: Alec Bathgate / Chris Knox - 3 EPs (Tall Dwarfs)
    • Wayne Conway - Twist (Dave Dobbyn)
    • Wayne Conway - Broadcast (Strawpeople)
  • Lifetime Achievement Award: Ian Magan

See: 1995 in music

Performing arts

Radio and television

See: 1995 in New Zealand television, 1995 in television, List of TVNZ television programming, Category:New Zealand television, TV3 (New Zealand), Category:New Zealand television shows, Public broadcasting in New Zealand

Film

See: Category:1995 film awards, 1995 in film, List of New Zealand feature films, Cinema of New Zealand, Category:1995 films

Dance

Internet

See: NZ Internet History

Appointments and awards

See: New Zealand Order of Merit, Order of New Zealand

Sport

Athletics

Horse racing

Harness racing

Thoroughbred racing

Rugby league

  • 9 June, New Zealand defeated France 22-6.
  • 16 June, New Zealand drew with France 16-all.
  • 23 June, New Zealand lost to Australia 8-26.
  • 7 July, New Zealand lost to Australia 10-20.
  • 14 July, New Zealand lost to Australia 10-46.
  • New Zealand competed in the 1995 Rugby League World Cup, losing to Australia 30-20 in extra time in the semi final.

Shooting

  • Ballinger Belt – Ross Geange (Hamilton/Whatawhata)[10]

Soccer

Births

January–June

July–December

Deaths

January–March

April–June

July–September

  • 2 July – Richard Toy, architect (born 1911)
  • 22 July – Jack Bergin, neurologist, anti-abortion campaigner (born 1921)
  • 25 July
  • 31 July – Joan Cochran, social reformer, sex educator, teacher (born 1912)
  • 1 August – Colin Gray, World War II fighter ace (born 1914)
  • 8 August – Dot McNab, military administrator, political organizer (born 1921)
  • 13 August – Bruce Grant, alpine skier (born 1963)
  • 14 August – Freda White, show-jumper and racehorse trainer (born 1909)
  • 25 August – Erich Geiringer, physician, peace activist, writer (born 1917)
  • 27 August – Sir Geoffrey Roberts, military aviator and leader, airline manager (born 1906)
  • 1 September – Sylvia Chapman, doctor (born 1896)
  • 2 September – Ivan Vodanovich, rugby union player, coach and administrator (born 1930)
  • 3 September – Sir Lance Adams-Schneider, politician, diplomat (born 1919)
  • 5 September
  • 11 September – Peter McIntyre, painter and author (born 1910)
  • 21 September – Alan Deere, air force pilot (born 1917)
  • 24 September – Peter Butler, trade unionist, politician (born 1901)

October–December

  • 15 October – Poul Gnatt, ballet dancer, balletmaster (born 1923)
  • 16 October – Cam Campion, politician (born 1943)
  • 23 October – Harold Taylor, mathematician, physicist, university administrator, architectural historian (born 1907)
  • 25 October – Noel Crump, swimmer (born 1916)
  • 29 October – Fred Gerbic, politician (born 1932)
  • 31 October – Sir Wallace (Bill) Rowling, 30th Prime Minister of New Zealand (born 1927)
  • 5 November – Gordon Walters, painter (born 1919)
  • 13 November – Dale Trendall, classical art historian, university administrator (born 1909)
  • 20 November – George Burns, rower (born 1919)
  • 1 December – Colin Tapley, actor (born 1907)
  • 11 December – Euan Robertson, athlete (born 1948)
  • 21 December – Charlie Tumahai, musician, songwriter (born 1949)
  • 28 December – Kendrick Smithyman, poet (born 1922)

Full date unknown

References

  1. ^ Statistics New Zealand:Historical Population Estimates
  2. ^ [3]
  3. ^ "Waikato Independent". Cambridge Museum. 
  4. ^ de Havilland DHC-8 ZK-NEY, controlled flight into terrain, near Palmerston North, 9 June 1995
  5. ^ "Awards 1988". Listing. NZ Music Awards. Retrieved 28 September 2012. 
  6. ^ "1995 New Zealand Music Awards". Web page. RIANZ. Retrieved 28 September 2012. 
  7. ^ Temin, Christine (12 August 2004). "Black Grace troupe melds Maori culture and modern dance". The Boston Globe (Globe Newspaper Company). Retrieved 5 April 2008. 
  8. ^ List of NZ Trotting cup winners
  9. ^ Auckland Trotting cup at hrnz.co.nz
  10. ^ "New Zealand champion shot / Ballinger Belt winners". National Rifle Association of New Zealand. Retrieved 11 October 2014. 
  11. ^ Chatham Cup records, nzsoccer.com

See also

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