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1999 MTV Video Music Awards

1999 MTV Video Music Awards
Date Thursday, September 9, 1999
Location Metropolitan Opera House, New York City
Host Chris Rock
Television/Radio coverage
Network MTV
1998 MTV Video Music Awards 2000 >

The 1999 MTV Video Music Awards aired live on September 9, 1999, honoring the best music videos from June 13, 1998, to June 11, 1999. The show was hosted by Chris Rock at Metropolitan Opera House in New York City.[1] Lauryn Hill was the big winner of the night, taking home 4 Moonmen, including Best Female Video and the big one, Video of the Year

Highlights of the show included Diana Ross jiggling Lil' Kim's exposed breast in response to her outfit, which left her entire left breast uncovered, but for a small pastie on her nipple. The mothers of slain rappers Tupac Shakur and The Notorious B.I.G., Afeni Shakur and Voletta Wallace, came together to present the Best Rap Video Award. The Beastie Boys' Adam Horovitz made a plea for peace in the wake of the sexual assaults at Woodstock '99. Near the end of the night, MTV staged a tribute to Madonna, the most-nominated artist in VMA history, by presenting a host of male drag performers dressed as the singer her past music videos. Rapper DMX was scheduled to perform but was a no-show; as a result, Jay-Z's solo set was extended.

As Backstreet Boys came up and accepted their award for Viewer's Choice, a stranger came onto the stage and said, "Wake up at 3". This person was later revealed to be John Del Signore, who crashed the ceremony in a failed attempt to sell Viacom a show idea.[2]

Contents

  • Nominations 1
    • Video of the Year 1.1
    • Best Male Video 1.2
    • Best Female Video 1.3
    • Best Group Video 1.4
    • Best New Artist in a Video 1.5
    • Best Pop Video 1.6
    • Best Rock Video 1.7
    • Best R&B Video 1.8
    • Best Rap Video 1.9
    • Best Hip-Hop Video 1.10
    • Best Dance Video 1.11
    • Best Video from a Film 1.12
    • Breakthrough Video 1.13
    • Best Direction in a Video 1.14
    • Best Choreography in a Video 1.15
    • Best Special Effects in a Video 1.16
    • Best Art Direction in a Video 1.17
    • Best Editing in a Video 1.18
    • Best Cinematography in a Video 1.19
    • Best Artist Website 1.20
    • Viewer's Choice 1.21
    • International Viewer's Choice Awards 1.22
      • MTV Australia 1.22.1
      • MTV Brasil 1.22.2
      • MTV India 1.22.3
      • MTV Korea 1.22.4
      • MTV Latin America (North) 1.22.5
      • MTV Latin America (South) 1.22.6
      • MTV Mandarin 1.22.7
      • MTV Russia 1.22.8
      • MTV Southeast Asia 1.22.9
  • Performances 2
    • Pre-show 2.1
    • Main show 2.2
  • Aborted Performance 3
  • Appearances 4
  • External links 5
  • References 6

Nominations

Winners are in bold text.

Video of the Year

Lauryn Hill — "Doo Wop (That Thing)"

Best Male Video

Will Smith — "Miami"

Best Female Video

Lauryn Hill — "Doo Wop (That Thing)"

Best Group Video

TLC — "No Scrubs"

Best New Artist in a Video

Eminem — "My Name Is"

Best Pop Video

Ricky Martin — "Livin' la Vida Loca"

Best Rock Video

Korn — "Freak on a Leash"

Best R&B Video

Lauryn Hill — "Doo Wop (That Thing)"

Best Rap Video

Jay-Z (featuring Ja Rule and Amil) — "Can I Get A..."

Best Hip-Hop Video

Beastie Boys — "Intergalactic"

Best Dance Video

Ricky Martin — "Livin' la Vida Loca"

Best Video from a Film

Madonna — "Beautiful Stranger" (from Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me)

Breakthrough Video

Fatboy Slim — "Praise You"

Best Direction in a Video

Fatboy Slim — "Praise You" (Director: Torrance Community Dance Group)

Best Choreography in a Video

Fatboy Slim — "Praise You" (Choreographers: Richard Koufey and Michael Rooney)

Best Special Effects in a Video

Garbage — "Special" (Special Effects: Sean Broughton, Stuart D. Gordon and Paul Simpson of Digital Domain)

Best Art Direction in a Video

Lauryn Hill — "Doo Wop (That Thing)" (Art Direction: Gideon Ponte)

Best Editing in a Video

Korn — "Freak on a Leash" (Editors: Haines Hall and Michael Sachs)

Best Cinematography in a Video

Marilyn Manson — "The Dope Show" (Director of Photography: Martin Coppen)

Best Artist Website

Red Hot Chili Peppers (www.redhotchilipeppers.com)

Viewer's Choice

Backstreet Boys — "I Want It That Way"

International Viewer's Choice Awards

MTV Australia

Silverchair — "Anthem for the Year 2000"

MTV Brasil

Raimundos — "Mulher de Fases"

MTV India

A. R. Rahman — "Dil Se Re"

MTV Korea

H.O.T. — "Make a Line"

MTV Latin America (North)

Ricky Martin — "Livin' la Vida Loca"

MTV Latin America (South)

Ricky Martin — "Livin' la Vida Loca"

MTV Mandarin

Shino Lin — "Irritated"

MTV Russia

Ricky Martin — "Livin' la Vida Loca"

MTV Southeast Asia

Parokya ni Edgar — "Harana"

Performances

Pre-show

Main show

Aborted Performance

Originally, the producers of the show tried to coax the former boy band New Kids On The Block to perform at the ceremony and present an award. Donnie Wahlberg, Danny Wood, Jordan Knight and Joey McIntyre were all on board to reunite, but the lone exception was Jonathan Knight. The group will later reunite nine years later, embarking on a studio album and a tour.

Appearances

External links

  • Official MTV site

References

  1. ^ "Lauryn Hill, Ricky Martin and Fatboy Slim Dominate TheFinal MTV Video Music Awards Of The 20th Century". Business Wire (allbusiness.com). 10 September 1999. Retrieved 2011-05-20. 
  2. ^ http://www.theawl.com/2009/11/john-del-signore-bite-me-kanye-i-bum-rushed-the-mtv-video-music-awards%E2%80%94ten-years-ago-this-week
  3. ^ "Kids ThinkLink - CultureLink". Archived from the original on 2009-07-21. Retrieved 2009-06-30. 
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