2004–05 Cambridge United F.C. season

Cambridge United
2004–05 season
Chairman England Roger Hunt
Manager France Hervé Renard
(until 12 December 2004)
England Steve Thompson
Conference National 24th
FA Cup First Round
FA Trophy First Round
Top goalscorer Shane Tudor (7)
Home colours
Away colours

The 2004–05 season was the 93rd season in the history of Cambridge United F.C., and the club's final season in the Football League after a 35-year stay since their initial election in 1970. As well as relegation to the Football Conference for the first time in the club's history, the club was in disarray off the pitch, entering administration and selling their Abbey Stadium home.[1][2]

Background

Cambridge United were founded in 1912 as Abbey United, named after the Abbey district of Cambridge. For many years they played amateur football until their election to the Football League in 1970. The early 1990s was Cambridge's most successful period; managed by John Beck the club won the first ever play-off final at Wembley Stadium and gained promotion from the Fourth Division before reaching two successive FA Cup quarter finals in 1990 and 1991 and winning the Third Division in 1991. The club reached the play-offs in 1992 but failed in their bid to become founder members of the Premier League.[3] This was the club's highest final league placing to date and since then it has been in almost constant decline.

The following season the club sacked Beck and were relegated from the First Division. Further relegation followed two seasons later. United returned briefly to Division Two but were relegated in 2002. After struggling in League Two, the best Cambridge fans were hoping for during the season was to avoid relegation and the financial trouble that would bring.

Match results

Match won Match drawn Match lost Biggest win Biggest loss Relegation Zone

League results

Kick Off Opponents H / A Result Scorers Attendance Pos
7 August 2004 Wycombe Wanderers A 1 – 2 Easter 70' 4,726 15th
10 August 2004 Leyton Orient H 1 – 1 Walker 53' 4,114 14th
14 August 2004 Shrewsbury Town H 1 – 0 Chillingworth 51' 3,135 10th

League Cup

FA Cup

League table

Pos
Team
Pld
W
D
L
GF
GA
GD
Pts
Qualification or relegation
1 Yeovil Town 46 25 8 13 90 65 +25 83 Promotion to League One
2 Scunthorpe United 46 22 14 10 69 42 +27 80
3 Swansea City 46 24 8 14 62 43 +19 80
4 Southend United 46 22 12 12 65 46 +19 78 Qualification to League Two playoffs
5 Macclesfield Town 46 22 9 15 60 49 +11 75
6 Lincoln City 46 20 12 14 64 47 +17 72
7 Northampton Town 46 20 12 14 62 51 +11 72
8 Darlington 46 20 12 14 57 49 +8 72
9 Rochdale 46 16 18 12 54 48 +6 66
10 Wycombe Wanderers 46 17 14 15 58 52 +6 65
11 Leyton Orient 46 16 15 15 65 67 −2 63
12 Bristol Rovers 46 13 21 12 60 57 +3 60
13 Mansfield Town 46 15 15 16 56 56 0 60
14 Cheltenham Town 46 16 12 18 51 54 −3 60
15 Oxford United 46 16 11 19 50 63 −13 59
16 Boston United 46 14 16 16 62 58 +4 58
17 Bury 46 14 16 16 54 54 0 58
18 Grimsby Town 46 14 16 16 51 52 −1 58
19 Notts County 46 13 13 20 46 62 −16 52
20 Chester 46 12 16 18 43 69 −26 52
21 Shrewsbury Town 46 11 16 19 48 53 −5 49
22 Rushden & Diamonds 46 10 14 22 42 63 −21 44
23 Kidderminster Harriers 46 10 8 28 39 85 −46 38 Relegation to Conference National
24 Cambridge United 46 8 16 22 39 62 −23 030

Updated to games played on last day of season.
Source: 2004-05 League Two
Rules for classification: 1) points; 2) goal difference; 3) number of goals scored.
(C) = Champion; (R) = Relegated; (P) = Promoted; (E) = Eliminated; (O) = Play-off winner; (A) = Advances to a further round.
Only applicable when the season is not finished:
(Q) = Qualified to the phase of tournament indicated; (TQ) = Qualified to tournament, but not yet to the particular phase indicated; (DQ) = Disqualified from tournament.
Cambridge United deducted 10 points for entering administration[4]

References

See also

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