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2006 in New Zealand

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2006 in New Zealand

2006 in New Zealand
Decades:

Incumbents

Regal and viceregal

Government

The 48th New Zealand Parliament continued. Government was a coalition between Labour and the Progressives, with United Future and New Zealand First supporting supply votes. The leaders of the two support parties are ministers outside Cabinet.

Non-Labour ministers

Parliamentary leaders

Main centre leaders

Events

January

  • 1 January: Changes to New Zealand citizenship laws mean not all babies born in New Zealand have a right to be citizens. Babies must have a parent who is a citizen or permanent resident of New Zealand or its dependencies. (TVNZ)
  • 2 January: New Zealand's warm sunny New Year weather has come to a sudden end as gale-force winds and rain assault southern New Zealand. (Wikinews)
  • 7 January:The New Zealand Māori Queen, Te Arikinui Dame Te Atairangikaahu, is undergoing dialysis treatment, the Tainui Tribe confirmed today. The Queen's condition is not believed to be critical. (Wikinews)
  • 9 January: Electricity generator and retailer TrustPower announces that it is considering a wind farm development at Lake Mahinerangi, south of Dunedin. (Wikinews)
  • 13 January: Winston Peters says there is no travel warning for New Zealanders visiting Fiji, although Australia has issued one, after the Fijian military commander threatened to remove the Government. (New Zealand Herald)
  • 14 January:The Government announces a review of liquor advertising amidst concern over teenage binge drinking. The review will consider regulating sponsorship of sport by alcohol companies. Lion Nathan says there is no need for change. (Radio New Zealand) (Stuff)
  • 15 January: Review of David Lange's documents show that the United States threatened to spy on New Zealand if it did not back down from its 1980s anti-nuclear legislation. (Stuff)
  • 21 January:A Wellington sperm bank refuses to accept a donation from a gay man, apparently to minimise the risk of HIV transmission. (Stuff)

February

March

April

May

  • 1 May: Troubles continue at TVNZ, with leaked emails from Craig Boyce to Ian Fraser, referring to the Parliamentary select committee as "the bastards are our enemy".
  • 3 May: The New Zealand Government announces that it will require Telecom to unbundle the local loop to provide "access to fast, competitively priced broadband internet".
  • 13 May: The trawler Kotuku sinks in Foveaux Strait on the way back from muttonbirding. Of the nine people on board, including three generations of one family, only three survive. It is New Zealand's worst maritime disaster since the sinking of TEV Wahine.[2]
  • 15 May: After 40 days of climbing, New Zealander Mark Inglis became the first double amputee to reach the summit of Mount Everest, the tallest mountain in the world.
  • 16 May: Michael Ryan, a messenger for the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet is named as the government employee who leaked the information to Telecom that the government is planning to "unbundle the local loop".
  • 17 May: An attempt by the Green Party to repeal part of a controversial dog microchipping law was voted down 61-60.
  • 18 May: Finance Minister Michael Cullen delivers the 2006 Budget.
  • 24 May: The week-long festivities celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Māori Queen's coronation have ended.
  • 25 May: The three men acquitted of rape in the Louise Nicholas trial now face a new trial for alleged sexual offences against another woman in the mid-1980s. (NZ Herald)

June

  • 3 June: The Green Party elects Russel Norman as its co-leader to replace Rod Donald.
  • 6 June: The trial of Tim Selwyn for sedition begins in Auckland. Selwyn is the first New Zealander in over 80 years to be charged with sedition.
  • 7 June: The Privy Council agrees to hear David Bain's appeal against his conviction for the murder of his family.
  • 8 June: Tim Selwyn is found guilty of sedition.
  • 8 June: New Zealand has won hosting rights for the 2010 World Rowing Championships, which will be held at Lake Karapiro.
  • 10 June: The family of Richard Seddon remember his death 100 years ago.
  • 10 June: A Yemeni man, linked to the 11 September 2001 attacks in the United States, has been deported from New Zealand. It is only the second time that section 72 of the Immigration Act has been used to deport someone. Its use requires the consent of the Governor-General, and there is no right of appeal.
  • 12 June: A blackout hits Auckland, lasting for several hours and affecting an estimated 700,000 people. The cause was found to be an earth wire which snapped off in high winds and fell across high-voltage transmission lines at a substation.
  • A severe storm lashed the country, bringing heavy snow to Otago and Canterbury Some small communities lose power for up to 12 days after the storm.
  • 15 June: A free-to-air digital television service called Freeview will be launched in 2007. All viewers will require a set-top box, and some will need a satellite dish.
  • 15 June: Junior doctors begin a five-day strike over working hours and conditions. Hospitals defer non-urgent surgery and outpatient treatments.
  • 16 June: The Varroa bee mite has been found near Stoke. The mite arrived in New Zealand in 2000 and has been confined to the North Island until now.
  • 18 June: The deaths of three-month-old twins Chris and Cru Kahui as a result of abuse injuries shocks the nation and dominates headlines for months.
  • 21 June: Working dogs have been exempted from the dog microchipping legislation currently before Parliament.
  • 27 June: Telecom announces it will voluntarily separate its business into two operating entities - Wholesale and Retail.
  • 29 June: Development of the Kupe gas and oil field off the Taranaki coast will go ahead, with production beginning in 2009.
  • 30 June: Tame Iti is sentenced to pay $300 and court costs for shooting the New Zealand Flag.

July

  • 2 July: The Intellectual Property Office has turned down an application by Ngāti Toa to trademark Ka Mate, the haka used by the All Blacks.
  • 3 July: Police Minister Annette King and Police Commissioner Howard Broad both deny that New Zealand Police have quotas for speeding tickets after a memo about such quotas is leaked.
  • 4 July:An Italian Fiat advert draws criticism from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade for having women perform the haka.
  • 10 July: Labour List MP Jim Sutton announces he is leaving politics on 1 August 2006. He will be replaced by the next member of the Labour Party list, Charles Chauvel.
  • 11 July: Te Atairangi Kaahu, the Māori Queen, is taken to Waikato Hospital's intensive care unit after a possible heart attack and kidney failure.
  • 18 July: Tim Selwyn is sentenced to 2 months imprisonment for sedition in Auckland. He is also sentenced to a further 15 months for other offenses.
  • 18 July: Former Cabinet Minister Taito Phillip Field is cleared of any conflict of interest by an inquiry into allegations he had used his position for material gain, but his judgement was criticised.
  • 25 July: The Overlander rail passenger service will be withdrawn at the end of September, thus ending the last passenger service operating between Auckland and Wellington.
  • 31 July: New smaller and lighter coins are introduced in denominations of 10c, 20c, and 50c.

August

September

  • 2 September: Natural gas supplies were cut to about 1000 central Wellington businesses for four days, after water entered Powerco's gas mains.
  • 7 September: Four mayors in the Auckland Region meet with Helen Clark to discuss the possibility of amalgamating their city councils to a single body.
  • 10 September: Tonga's King Taufa'ahau Tupou IV dies in Auckland.
  • 13 September: Don Brash takes leave to sort out marital problems amidst rumours he had an affair.
  • 14 September: Stephen Tindall announces his intention of buying out the other shareholders in the retail chain he founded, The Warehouse. Tindall currently has a controlling share in the company.
  • 18 September: The Prime Minister's husband Peter Davis is accused of being gay, after a picture is published of him kissing another man. Both Davis and Clark deny the claim; the picture later turns out to be a still from election night coverage.(news.com.au) See also:Investigate.
  • 21 September: The dispute between supermarket company Progressive Enterprises and over 500 employees is resolved after 28 days.
  • 25 September: Shares in carpet maker Feltex are suspended on the New Zealand Exchange after the company is placed in receivership on 22 September.
  • 26 September: Brian Connell is suspended from the National Party caucus.
  • 27 September: Bacardi offers NZ$138 million to buy the New Zealand alcoholic drink company 42 Below.
  • 28 September: Dunedin's Logan Park High School is threatened by a large forest fire in a plantation bordering the school.
  • 28 September: The Overlander train between Auckland and Wellington, due to be withdrawn at the end of the month, is to continue, but on a reduced schedule.
  • 29 September: The Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand votes to confirm a ban on people in de facto or gay relationships from becoming leaders in the Church.
  • 30 September: The New Zealand Government apologises to the Te Arawa iwi over Treaty of Waitangi grievances, and returns 500 square kilometres of Crown land and 19 areas of special significance to it.

October

November

December

  • 4 December: The Copyright (New Technologies and Performers' Rights) Amendment Bill, is introduced to update copyright laws due to the development and adoption of new technologies.
  • 16 December: Three children are killed when a cliff collapses on them at a riverside picnic ground in the Manawatu region.
  • 16 December: Nine experienced New Zealand firefighters are injured, one seriously, as they fought Bushfires in Victoria, Australia.
  • 22 December: The Government announces changes to the regulations governing the sale of consumer fireworks. Sales will now be restricted to 3 (previously 10) days of the year - 3–5 November and the age limit for purchase has been raised from 16 to 18.
  • 28 December - The contentious Wellington Inner city bypass opens
  • 31 December: The 2006 road toll provisionally stands at 387, the lowest figure since 1963
  • See also Current events in Oceania

Arts and literature

Awards

Performing arts

Television

Film

Internet

Sport

Athletics

  • Dale Warrender wins his second national title in the men's marathon, clocking 2:17:43 on 29 October in Auckland, while Tracey Clissold claims her second as well in the women's championship (2:50:47).

Basketball

Commonwealth Games

  • The largest New Zealand team ever sent to a Commonwealth Games went to the 2006 Games at Melbourne, but did not do as well as expected, recording the worst result since 1982. See New Zealand at the 2006 Commonwealth Games.

Cricket

Horse racing

Harness racing

Thoroughbred racing

Mountain biking

Olympic Games

Rugby league

Rugby union

  • New Zealand(All Blacks) retained the Tri Nations and Bledisloe Cup. Only losing one match to South Africa.
  • North Harbour wins the Ranfurly Shield from Canterbury 21-17 at Jade Stadium
  • The All Blacks convincingly won all four tests in their end-of-season tour of England, France and Wales.

Rowing

  • Mahé Drysdale defends his gold medal at the World Championships in August

Shooting

  • Ballinger Belt – Brian Carter (Te Puke)[6]

Soccer

Births

Deaths

January

February

March

April

May

June

  • 2 June – Kitione Lave, boxer (born 1934)
  • 4 June – Vic Belsham, rugby league player and referee (born c.1925)
  • 11 June – Neroli Fairhall, archer, first paraplegic to compete in the Olympic Games (born 1944)
  • 12 June – Nicky Barr, rugby union player and World War II flying ace (born 1915)
  • 13 June – Barry Thompson, rugby union player (born 1947)
  • 15 June – Herb Pearson, cricketer (born 1910)

July

August

September

October

  • 8 October – Mark Porter, motor racing driver (born 1974)
  • 14 October – Peter Munz, philosopher and historian (born 1921)

November

December

  • 6 December – John Feeney, documentary film director (born 1922)
  • 10 December – Willow Macky, songwriter (born 1921)
  • 23 December – Graham May, weightlifter (born c.1952)
  • 29 December – Tommy Lynch, rugby league player (born 1927)

Births to deaths

See also

References

  1. ^ "Former Governors-General". New Zealand Government. Archived from the original on 6 June 2011. Retrieved 16 June 2011. 
  2. ^ "Inquest into six trawler deaths abandoned". New Zealand Herald. 10 December 2008. Retrieved 9 December 2008. 
  3. ^ "Variety spices up music awards gongs". Scoop.co.nz. 19 October 2006. Retrieved 21 October 2012. 
  4. ^ List of NZ Trotting cup winners
  5. ^ Auckland Trotting cup at hrnz.co.nz
  6. ^ "New Zealand champion shot / Ballinger Belt winners". National Rifle Association of New Zealand. Retrieved 18 April 2014. 
  7. ^ Chatham Cup records, nzsoccer.com

External links

Media related to at Wikimedia Commons
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