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2007 Purdue Boilermakers football team

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Title: 2007 Purdue Boilermakers football team  
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Subject: 2008 NFL draft, 2011 Purdue Boilermakers football team, Purdue Boilermakers football, 2007 Big Ten Conference football season, 2007 Penn State Nittany Lions football team
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2007 Purdue Boilermakers football team

2007 Purdue Boilermakers football
Motor City Bowl Champions
Conference Big Ten Conference
2007 record 8–5 (3–5 Big Ten)
Head coach Joe Tiller (11th season)
Offensive coordinator Bill Legg (5th, 2nd as Co-OC) & Ed Zaunbrecher (2nd, 2nd as Co-OC)
Offensive scheme One-Back Shotgun Spread
Defensive coordinator Brock Spack (11th season)
Base defense 4-3
MVP Dustin Keller
Captain Cliff Avril
Captain Dan Bick
Captain Stanford Keglar
Captain Curtis Painter
Home stadium Ross-Ade Stadium
(Capacity: 62,500)

The 2007 Purdue Boilermakers football represented Purdue University in the Big Ten Conference during the 2007 NCAA Division I FBS football season. Joe Tiller, in his 11th season at Purdue, was the team's head coach. The Boilermakers' home games were played at Ross-Ade Stadium in West Lafayette, Indiana. Purdue began the 2007 season unranked in preseason polls. Purdue played twelve regular season games during the 2007 season, including seven in West Lafayette. They played in the Motor City Bowl where they defeated Central Michigan.

Schedule

Date Time Opponent# Site TV Result Attendance
September 1 7:00 PM at Toledo* Glass BowlToledo, OH ESPNU W 52–24   26,100[1]
September 8 12:00 PM Eastern Illinois* Ross–Ade StadiumWest Lafayette, IN BTN W 52–6   52,504[1]
September 15 12:00 PM Central Michigan* Ross–Ade Stadium • West Lafayette, IN ESPN2 W 45–22   60,038[1]
September 22 9:00 PM at Minnesota Hubert H. Humphrey MetrodomeMinneapolis, MN ESPN2 W 45–31   47,483[1]
September 29 12:00 PM Notre Dame* Ross–Ade Stadium • West Lafayette, IN (Shillelagh Trophy) ESPN W 33–19   65,250[1]
October 6 8:00 PM #4 Ohio State #23 Ross–Ade Stadium • West Lafayette, IN ABC L 7–23   65,497[1]
October 13 12:00 PM at Michigan Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI BTN L 21–48   110,888[1]
October 20 12:00 PM Iowa Ross–Ade Stadium • West Lafayette, IN ESPN2 W 31–6   58,123[1]
October 27 12:00 PM Northwesterndagger Ross–Ade Stadium • West Lafayette, IN BTN W 35–17   58,237[1]
November 3 12:00 PM at Penn State Beaver StadiumUniversity Park, PA ESPN L 19–26   108,318[1]
November 10 12:00 PM Michigan State Ross–Ade Stadium • West Lafayette, IN BTN L 31–48   55,630[1]
November 17 3:30 PM at Indiana Memorial StadiumBloomington, IN (Old Oaken Bucket) BTN L 24–27   50,741[1]
December 26 7:30 PM vs. Central Michigan* Ford FieldDetroit, MI (Motor City Bowl) ESPN W 51–48   60,624[1]
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll. All times are in Eastern Time.

Roster

Game notes

Toledo

1 2 3 4 Total
Purdue 14 14 9 15 52
Toledo 7 7 0 10 24

Eastern Illinois

1 2 3 4 Total
Eastern Illinois 3 0 3 0 6
Purdue 17 14 7 14 52

Central Michigan

1 2 3 4 Total
Central Michigan 0 0 14 8 22
Purdue 24 7 7 7 45
  • Date: September 15
  • Location: Ross-Ade Stadium, West Lafayette, Indiana

Minnesota

1 2 3 4 Total
Purdue 17 7 14 7 45
Minnesota 3 0 14 14 31
  • Source: ESPN

Notre Dame

1 2 3 4 Total
Notre Dame 0 0 6 13 19
• Purdue 10 13 3 7 33

[2]

Ohio State

1 2 3 4 Total
Ohio St 14 3 3 3 23
Purdue 0 0 0 7 7
  • Date: October 6
  • Location: Ross-Ade Stadium, West Lafayette, Indiana

Michigan

1 2 3 4 Total
Purdue 7 0 0 14 21
Michigan 17 14 3 14 48

Iowa

1 2 3 4 Total
Iowa 3 0 3 0 6
Purdue 7 7 7 10 31
  • Date: October 20
  • Location: Ross-Ade Stadium, West Lafayette, Indiana

Northwestern

1 2 3 4 Total
Northwestern 0 14 3 0 17
Purdue 14 0 0 21 35
  • Date: October 27
  • Location: Ross-Ade Stadium, West Lafayette, Indiana

Penn State

1 2 3 4 Total
Purdue 10 0 6 3 19
Penn St 3 10 0 13 26

Michigan State

1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan St 7 24 0 17 48
Purdue 0 21 3 7 31
  • Date: November 10
  • Location: Ross-Ade Stadium, West Lafayette, Indiana

Indiana

1 2 3 4 Total
Purdue 0 3 7 14 24
Indiana 7 10 7 3 27

Motor City Bowl

1 2 3 4 Total
Purdue 21 13 7 10 51
Central Michigan 6 7 28 7 48

Boilermaker kicker Chris Summers hit a 40-yard field goal as time expired to defeat the Central Michigan Chippewas 51–48. Purdue Quarterback Curtis Painter passed for a Motor City Bowl record 546 yards, going 35-54 with 3 touchdowns and 2 interceptions. Kory Sheets led the Boilermakers in rushing with 12 attempts for 27 yards and 2 touchdowns. Painter's favorite target was Greg Orton who caught 9 passes for 136 yards and 1 touchdown. For Central Michigan, QB Dan LeFevour went 17–34 with 292 yards and 4 touchdowns and no interceptions. He also led the Chippewas in rushing with 33 attempts for 114 yards and 2 touchdowns. LeFevour's favorite target was Bryan Anderson who caught 7 passes for 129 yards and 3 touchdowns. During the 1st half it was all Boilermakers, with Purdue leading 34–13 at the break. In the 2nd half the Chippewas started their comeback. It started with a 76-yard pass from LeFevour to Antonio Brown to make it 34–20. The Boilermakers then scored again on a 19-yard pass from Painter to Jake Standeford to make it 41–20. The Chippewas then proceeded to score three unanswered touchdowns, a 10-yard pass to Anderson, and the two rushing touchdowns by LeFevour to tie the game. With 8:19 left in the 4th quarter, Purdue retook the lead on a 13-yard run by Jaycen Taylor. With 1:09 left, LeFevour hit Anderson for 19 yards and a touchdown to tie it at 48. It would turn out that the Chippewas scored too quickly. Painter then led a drive full of short first down passes to the Chippewa 23, where Summers would kick his 40 yard walk-off field goal.

2008 NFL Draft

Player Position Round Pick NFL Club
Dustin Keller Tight End 1 30 New York Jets
Cliff Avril Defensive End 3 92 Detroit Lions
Stanford Keglar Linebacker 4 134 Tennessee Titans

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m
  2. ^ ESPN. Retrieved 2014-Sep-29.
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