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2010 New Mexico Bowl

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Title: 2010 New Mexico Bowl  
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Subject: 2010 BYU Cougars football team, 2010 UTEP Miners football team, 2010–11 NCAA football bowl games, 2009 New Mexico Bowl, New Mexico Bowl
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2010 New Mexico Bowl

2010 New Mexico Bowl

New Mexico Bowl logo
1 2 3 4 Total
BYU 17 14 14 7 52
UTEP 3 7 7 7 24
Date December 18, 2010
Season 2010
Stadium University Stadium
Location Albuquerque, New Mexico
MVP QB Jake Heaps, BYU
S Andrew Rich, BYU
Favorite BYU by 11.5[1]
Referee Stan Evans (MAC)
Attendance 32,424
Payout US$750,000 per team
United States TV coverage
Network ESPN
Announcers: Bob Wischusen, Brian Griese and Jenn Brown
Nielsen ratings 1.8 / 2.78M
New Mexico Bowl
 < 2009  2011

The 2010 [2]

The game, which was telecast at 12 PM [3]

BYU won the game in dominating fashion by a score of 52–24.[4] Freshman quarterback Jake Heaps took home MVP honors with a game-record four touchdown passes, helping his team to a 31–3 second quarter lead. UTEP has lost five straight bowl games, the second-longest streak in the nation.

Game summary

Scoring summary

Scoring Play Score
1st Quarter
BYU - Bryan Kariya 4 yard run (Mitch Payne kick), 10:29 BYU 7–0
BYU - Jake Heaps 9 yard pass to Luke Ashworth (Mitch Payne kick), 4:37 BYU 14–0
UTEP - Dakota Warren 52 yard field goal, 2:42 BYU 14–3
BYU - Mitch Payne 38 yard field goal, 0:34 BYU 17–3
2nd Quarter
BYU - Jake Heaps 31 yard pass to Cody Hoffman (Mitch Payne kick), 14:42 BYU 24–3
BYU - Jake Heaps 3 yard pass to Cody Hoffman (Mitch Payne kick), 8:55 BYU 31–3
UTEP - Trevor Vittatoe 67 yard pass to Kris Adams (Dakota Warren kick), 8:38 BYU 31–10
3rd Quarter
BYU - JJ Di Luigi 2 yard run (Mitch Payne kick), 8:18 BYU 38–10
UTEP - Trevor Vittatoe 37 yard pass to Kris Adams (Dakota Warren kick), 4:55 BYU 38–17
BYU - Jake Heaps 29 yard pass to Cody Hoffman (Mitch Payne kick), 0:14 BYU 45–17
4th Quarter
BYU - Joshua Quezada 8 yard run (Mitch Payne kick), 12:00 BYU 52–17
UTEP - Trevor Vittatoe 49 yard pass to Kris Adams (Dakota Warren kick), 9:48 BYU 52–24

Statistics

Statistics BYU UTEP
First Downs 28 13
Rushes-yards (net) 50-219 22-12
Passing yards (net) 295 245
Passes, Att-Comp-Int 36-26-2 33-14-3
Total offense, plays - yards 86-514 55-233
Time of Possession 38:16 21:44

Game notes

  • UTEP was playing in their first bowl game since 2005.
  • The Miners have lost five straight bowl games, tied for the second longest active streak in the nation.
  • UTEP hasn't won a bowl game since defeating Ole Miss in the 1967 Sun Bowl (held on their campus).
  • BYU's Jake Heaps became the first freshman quarterback to start a bowl game in school history.
  • In the second quarter, Heaps broke Ty Detmer's 22-year-old BYU freshman record for most passing TDs in a season with 15.
  • Heaps' four touchdown passes in the game set a New Mexico Bowl record.
  • The game was BYU's final as a member of the Mountain West Conference. They will play as an independent starting in 2011.

References

  1. ^ The Tuscaloosa News, December 18, 2010
  2. ^ http://www.newmexicobowl.com/news/128/38/New-Mexico-Bowl-Unveils-New-Logo
  3. ^ http://espn.go.com/blog/ncfnation/post/_/id/34809/new-mexico-bowl
  4. ^ "Jake Heaps tosses four TDs as BYU takes care of UTEP". ESPN. 2010-12-18. Retrieved 2010-12-18. 

External links

  • Official site of the New Mexico Bowl
  • New Mexico Bowl Live
  • Box Score - ESPN
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