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Aaron T. Bliss

Aaron T. Bliss
25th Governor of Michigan
In office
January 1, 1901 – January 1, 1905
Lieutenant Orrin W. Robinson
Alexander Maitland
Preceded by Hazen S. Pingree
Succeeded by Fred M. Warner
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Michigan's 8th district
In office
March 4, 1889 – March 3, 1891
Preceded by Timothy E. Tarsney
Succeeded by Henry M. Youmans
Personal details
Born May 22, 1837
Peterboro, New York
Died September 16, 1906 (aged 69)
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Allaseba Phelps
Religion Methodist

Aaron Thomas Bliss (May 22, 1837 – September 16, 1906) was a U.S. Representative from and the 25th Governor of the US state of Michigan, and was from Saginaw. Bliss Township was named after him.[1]

Contents

  • Early life in New York 1
  • Civil War 2
  • Life in Michigan 3
  • Politics 4
  • Retirement and death 5
  • References 6
  • Additional reading 7

Early life in New York

Bliss was born to Lyman and Anna M. (Chaffee) Bliss in Peterboro, New York and attended the common schools. He was employed as a clerk in a store in Morrisville, New York, in 1853 and 1854 and with the $100 he made there he attended a select school in Munnsville, New York, in 1854. The following year, Bliss moved to Bouckville, a small town in Madison County, New York, where he engaged in mercantile pursuits.

Civil War

During the Petersburg, Virginia, where he remained until the war ended.

Life in Michigan

In December 1865, he moved to Saginaw, Michigan and found employment at a shingle mill. With his brother, Lyman W. Bliss, and J. H. Jerome, he formed A. T. Bliss & Company and engaged in the manufacture of lumber and the exploitation of lands along the Tobacco River. On March 31, 1868, he married Allaseba Morey Phelps of Solsville, New York north of the town of Madison. That same spring the brothers bought the Jerome mill at Zilwaukee, and it became A. T. Bliss & Brother. In 1880, Bliss was one of the organizers and a director of the Citizen’s National Bank, which was reorganized into the Bank of Saginaw, and was president and director of the Saginaw County Savings Bank.

Politics

In 1882, Bliss was elected member of the Michigan Senate from Saginaw County (25th district), and during that time helped establish a soldiers' home in Grand Rapids. He was appointed aide-de-camp on the staff of Governor Russell A. Alger in 1885, with the rank of colonel, and held the same position on the staff of the commander in chief of the Grand Army of the Republic in 1888.

In 1888, Bliss was elected as a Republican from Michigan's 8th congressional district to the 51st Congress, serving from March 4, 1889 to March 3, 1891. Among notable bills he introduced were for appropriating $100,000 for a federal building in Saginaw and $25,000 for an Indian school at Mt. Pleasant. He was an unsuccessful candidate for re-election in 1890 to the 52nd Congress, being defeated by Democrat Henry M. Youmans.

After leaving Congress, Bliss resumed the lumber business and also engaged in banking. He was department commander of the Grand Army of the Republic in Michigan in 1897.

In 1900, Bliss was elected Governor of Michigan, defeating mayor of Detroit William C. Maybury, and was re-elected in 1902, serving from 1901 through 1904.[2] During his four years in office, the Michigan Employment Institution for the Adult Blind was established in Saginaw, a state highway department was formed, and railroad taxation was sanctioned.

Retirement and death

Bliss was a patron of the Home for the Friendless, the Y.M.C.A., the Methodist Church and was also a member of the Freemasons and Knights Templar.

Bliss died less than two years after leaving office at the age of sixty-eight in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, while on a visit for medical treatment. He is interred in Forest Lawn Cemetery in Saginaw, Michigan.

References

  1. ^ 1999 Michigan Encyclopedia, retrieved 3-Nov-2014
  2. ^ Election notes, Aaron Bliss

Mills, James Cooke (2005) [1892]. "s.v. Aaron T. Bliss". History of Saginaw County, Michigan. Saginaw, Mich.: Seemann & Peters. pp. 24–28. Retrieved May 11, 2007. 

Additional reading

  • (East Lansing, Michigan: Michigan State University Press)Messages of the Governors of Michigan, Volume 4Fuller, George, Ed., ISBN 0-87013-723-9; ISBN 978-0-87013-723-5.
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Timothy E. Tarsney
United States Representative for the 8th Congressional District of Michigan
1889–1891
Succeeded by
Henry M. Youmans
Political offices
Preceded by
Hazen S. Pingree
Governor of Michigan
1901–1905
Succeeded by
Fred M. Warner
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