World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Acting President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles

 

Acting President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles

Acting President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles is a priesthood calling in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church).

In general, the position of Acting President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles is only filled when the President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles is called as a counselor in the First Presidency of the church. In such instances, the man who holds this calling is the most senior apostle who is not serving in the First Presidency. Additionally, a person may be called as the Acting President of the Quorum when the actual President of the Quorum is unable to perform his duties due to ill health or other incapacitation.

The formal calling of Acting President of the Quorum has been held six times by five men: Rudger Clawson, Joseph Fielding Smith, Spencer W. Kimball, Howard W. Hunter, and Boyd K. Packer. Additionally, two earlier apostles—Orson Hyde and Brigham Young, Jr.—have acted as President of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles when they were not the second-most senior apostle in the church, and therefore may be said to have played the role of an Acting President of the Quorum before this specific title was created by the church.

Duties

As the Acting President of the Quorum, the person with this calling performs all of the duties that would normally be performed by the President of the Quorum. Primarily, these duties consist of presiding at and conducting the weekly meetings of the Quorum in the Salt Lake Temple; making decisions about the particular assignments to be made to the members of the Quorum; and acting as a liaison in coordinating the work of the Quorum with the First Presidency, the Quorums of the Seventy, and the Presiding Bishopric.

When adherents refer to the Acting President of the Quorum of the Twelve, his name is usually prefaced by the honorific title "President".

Five formal Acting Presidents in six terms

Acting President President Dates Reason Acting President was needed Reason tenure ended
Rudger Clawson Anthon H. Lund 23 November 1918 – 17 March 1921 Lund, the President of the Quorum, was asked to be a counselor in the First Presidency to Church President Heber J. Grant Death of Lund
Joseph Fielding Smith David O. McKay 8 August 1950 – 4 April 1951 Quorum President George Albert Smith Death of George Albert Smith and dissolution of the First Presidency, which resulted in McKay returning to the Quorum
Spencer W. Kimball Harold B. Lee 23 January 1970 – 2 July 1972 Lee, the President of the Quorum, was asked to be a counselor in the First Presidency to Church President Joseph Fielding Smith Death of Joseph Fielding Smith and dissolution of the First Presidency, which resulted in Lee returning to the Quorum
Howard W. Hunter Marion G. Romney 10 November 1985 – 20 May 1988 Romney, the Quorum President, was incapacitated due to ill health. Hunter is the only Acting President to serve while the actual President was still a member of the Quorum Death of Romney
Boyd K. Packer Gordon B. Hinckley 5 June 1994 – 3 March 1995 Hinckley, the Quorum President, was serving as a counselor in the First Presidency to church president Howard W. Hunter. Thomas S. Monson, who was next in seniority after Hinckley, was also serving as a counselor in the First Presidency. Death of Hunter and dissolution of the First Presidency, which resulted in Hinckley returning to the Quorum.
Thomas S. Monson 12 March 1995 – 27 January 2008 Monson, the Quorum President, was serving as a counselor in the First Presidency to church presidency Gordon B. Hinckley. Packer is the only person to serve two separated terms as Acting President. Death of Hinckley and dissolution of the First Presidency, which resulted in Monson returning to the Quorum.

Two "Acting Presidents" of the Quorum prior to the creation of the formal title

Bust photo of Orson Hyde
Bust photo of Brigham Young, Jr.
  • Orson Hyde (27 December 1847 – 22 June 1868): When senior apostle Brigham Young was made President of the Church on 27 December 1847, the next senior apostle, Heber C. Kimball, was asked by Young to be one of the counselors in the First Presidency. This left Orson Hyde as the most senior member of the Quorum of the Twelve. According to current practices of the church, Kimball should have been called as President of the Quorum and Hyde as Acting President. However, this procedure was not followed, and Hyde was simply called as President of the Quorum. This created a historical anomaly whereby Hyde served as the President of the Quorum (not Acting President) while being the third most senior apostle until Kimball's death on 22 June 1868.
  • Joseph F. Smith, were asked by Snow to be counselors in the First Presidency. This left Brigham Young, Jr.—who was the third most senior apostle of the church, but the fourth most senior member of the Quorum—as the most senior member of the Quorum of the Twelve. Rather than making Cannon the President of the Quorum, as would be the procedure today, Snow simply asked Young to serve as the President of the Quorum. When Cannon died in April 1901, Young continued to serve as President of the Quorum, despite the fact that Joseph F. Smith was the second most senior apostle of the church. When Snow died later that same year, Smith became president of the church and Young continued on as President of the Quorum until his own death in 1903.


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.