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Al-Baqillani

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Al-Baqillani

Abu Bakr Muḥammad ibn al-Ṭayyib al-Bāqillānī
Title Sayf as-Sunna ("Sword of the Prophetic way"),[1] Imād al-Dīn ("Pillar of the Faith"),[2] Nāsir al-Islām ("Protector of Islam")[3]
Born 338/930[4]
Basra[5][6]
Died 403/1013[7]
Denomination Sunni
Jurisprudence Maliki[8]
Creed Ash'ari[9]
Main interest(s) Theology (Kalam), Philosophy, Logic, Islamic Jurisprudence

Abu Bakr Muḥammad ibn al-Ṭayyib al-Bāqillānī (Arabic: أبو بكر محمد بن الطيب الباقلاني‎) was a famous Islamic scholar, theologian and logician who spent much of his life defending and strengthening orthodox Islam.[10]

Born in Basra in 330/930,[11] he spent most of his life in Baghdad, and studied theology under two disciples of al-Ash'ari,[12] Ibn Mujahid al-Ta'i and Abu'l Hasan al-Bahili.[13] He also studied jurisprudence under the Maliki scholars Abu Abdullah al-Shirazi and Ibn Abi Zayd al-Qayrawani.[14] After acquiring expertise in both Islamic theology and Maliki jurisprudence he expounding the teachings of the Ash'ari school, and taught Maliki jurisprudence in Baghdad.[15] He held the office of chief Qadi in Baghdad and in 'Ukbara, a town not far from the capital.[16] al-Bāqillānī became a popular lecturer, and took part in debates with well-known scholars of the day.[17] Because of his logical acumen and swift, unhesitating replies, the caliph 'Adud al-Dawla dispatched him as an envoy to the Byzantine court in Constantinople and he debated Christian scholars in the presence of their king in 371/981.[18][19]

He died in 403/1013.[20]

He supported the doctrine of the apologetic miracle being proof of prophecy, the noncreation of the Quran, intercession, and the possibility of seeing God.

His fifty two volumous books are regarded as classical works on expounding the Quran, its the textual integrity, defending orthodoxy and Islam, the miracles of the prophethood, summaries of the Sunni creed, defence of the Sunni position regarding the Imamate (Caliphate), rebutting Brahmanism, Dualism, Trinitarianism, etc.[21]

Ibn Taymiyya called al-Baqillani 'the best of the Ash'ari mutakallimun, unrivalled by any predecessor or successor'.[22]

Works

Fifty-five titles of works written by Al-Baqillani have been listed, the great majority on legal and theological matters, and many written against heretical Muslim and other opponents.[23]

  • I‘jāz al-Qur’ān (The Inimitability of the Qur'an)
  • Al-Intiṣār lil-Qur’ān
  • Al-Taqrīb wa-al-irshād al-ṣaghīr
  • Kitāb tamhīd al-awāʼil wa-talkhīṣ al-dalāʼil (The Introduction).
  • Al-Inṣāf fīmā yajibu i‘tiqāduhu wa-lā yajūzu al-jahl bihi fī ‘ilm al-kalām
  • Manāqib al-A’immah al-arba‘ah

References

  1. ^ Camilla Adang, Muslim Writers on Judaism and the Hebrew Bible: From Ibn Rabban to Ibn Hazm, p 53. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 1996. ISBN 9004100342.
  2. ^ Camilla Adang, Muslim Writers on Judaism and the Hebrew Bible: From Ibn Rabban to Ibn Hazm, p 53. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 1996. ISBN 9004100342.
  3. ^ Camilla Adang, Muslim Writers on Judaism and the Hebrew Bible: From Ibn Rabban to Ibn Hazm, p 53. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 1996. ISBN 9004100342.
  4. ^ Camilla Adang, Muslim Writers on Judaism and the Hebrew Bible: From Ibn Rabban to Ibn Hazm, p 51. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 1996. ISBN 9004100342.
  5. ^ Camilla Adang, Muslim Writers on Judaism and the Hebrew Bible: From Ibn Rabban to Ibn Hazm, p 51. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 1996. ISBN 9004100342.
  6. ^ David Richard Thomas, Christian Doctrines in Islamic Theology, p 119. Vol. 10 of History of Christian-Muslim Relations Series. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 2008. ISBN 9004169350
  7. ^ David Richard Thomas, Christian Doctrines in Islamic Theology, p 119. Vol. 10 of History of Christian-Muslim Relations Series. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 2008. ISBN 9004169350
  8. ^ Camilla Adang, Muslim Writers on Judaism and the Hebrew Bible: From Ibn Rabban to Ibn Hazm, p 51. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 1996. ISBN 9004100342.
  9. ^ Camilla Adang, Muslim Writers on Judaism and the Hebrew Bible: From Ibn Rabban to Ibn Hazm, p 51. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 1996. ISBN 9004100342.
  10. ^ Camilla Adang, Muslim Writers on Judaism and the Hebrew Bible: From Ibn Rabban to Ibn Hazm, p 53. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 1996. ISBN 9004100342.
  11. ^ Camilla Adang, Muslim Writers on Judaism and the Hebrew Bible: From Ibn Rabban to Ibn Hazm, p 51. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 1996. ISBN 9004100342.
  12. ^ Camilla Adang, Muslim Writers on Judaism and the Hebrew Bible: From Ibn Rabban to Ibn Hazm, p 51. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 1996. ISBN 9004100342.
  13. ^ Richard C. Martín, Encyclopedia of Islam & the Muslim World, Volume 1, p 105. ISBN 0028656032
  14. ^ Richard C. Martín, Encyclopedia of Islam & the Muslim World, Volume 1, p 105. ISBN 0028656032
  15. ^ Camilla Adang, Muslim Writers on Judaism and the Hebrew Bible: From Ibn Rabban to Ibn Hazm, p 51. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 1996. ISBN 9004100342.
  16. ^ Camilla Adang, Muslim Writers on Judaism and the Hebrew Bible: From Ibn Rabban to Ibn Hazm, p 51. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 1996. ISBN 9004100342.
  17. ^ David Richard Thomas, Christian Doctrines in Islamic Theology, p 119. Vol. 10 of History of Christian-Muslim Relations Series. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 2008. ISBN 9004169350
  18. ^ Nuh Keller, Reliance of the Traveller, x32. p 1026. Amana Publications, 1997. ISBN 0915957728
  19. ^ David Richard Thomas, Christian Doctrines in Islamic Theology, p 120. Vol. 10 of History of Christian-Muslim Relations Series. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 2008. ISBN 9004169350
  20. ^ David Richard Thomas, Christian Doctrines in Islamic Theology, p 119. Vol. 10 of History of Christian-Muslim Relations Series. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 2008. ISBN 9004169350
  21. ^ http://www.muslimphilosophy.com/ei2/baqillani.htm
  22. ^ http://www.at-tawhid.net/article-abu-bakr-al-baqillani-m-403-87802903.html
  23. ^ David Richard Thomas, Christian Doctrines in Islamic Theology, p 121. Vol. 10 of History of Christian-Muslim Relations Series. Leiden: Brill Publishers, 2008. ISBN 9004169350

External links

  • Biography of Imâm Al Bâqillânî by Al Qâdî 'Iyâd Al Yahsubî
  • Biography of Imâm Al Bâqillânî by Shaykh Jibrîl Al Haddâd
  • (French) Biographie de l'Imâm Al Bâqillânî par at-tawhid.net
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