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Anglican prayer beads

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Anglican prayer beads

The Anglican Rosary sitting atop The Anglican Breviary and The Book of Common Prayer

Anglican prayer beads, also known as the Anglican rosary or Anglican chaplet, are a loop of strung beads used chiefly by Anglicans in the Anglican Communion, as well as by communicants in the Anglican Continuum, and by members of the Anglican Ordinariates within the Roman Catholic Church.[1] Anglican prayer beads were developed in the latter part of the 20th century within the Episcopal Diocese of Texas and this Anglican devotion has spread to other Christian denominations, including Lutherans, Methodists, the Reformed, thus giving rise to the term Christian prayer beads.[2][3][4]

Contents

  • Beads 1
  • Groupings 2
  • Prayer 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Beads

Anglican prayer bead sets consist of thirty-three beads divided into groups. There are four groups consisting of seven beads with additional separate and larger beads separating the groups. The number thirty-three signifies the number of years that Christ lived on the Earth, while the number seven signifies wholeness or completion in the faith, the days of creation, and the seasons of the Church year.[5]

Groupings

Anglican Prayer Beads

The groupings are called "weeks," in contrast to the Dominican rosary which uses five groups of ten beads called "decades." The beads between are usually larger than the "weeks" beads are called "cruciform" beads. When the loop of beads is opened into a circular shape, these particular beads form the points of a cross within the circle of the set, hence the term "cruciform." Next after the cross on Anglican prayer bead sets is a single bead termed the "invitatory" bead, giving the total of thirty-three. The beads used are made of a variety of materials, such as precious stones, wood, colored glass, or even dried and painted seeds.

Anglican prayer bead sets are made with a variety of crosses or, occasionally, crucifixes. The Celtic cross and the San Damiano cross are two which are often used.

Prayer

The Anglican Rosary hangs next to a home altar

Unlike the Dominican rosary used by Roman and Anglo Catholics, which focuses on the seminal events in the life of Christ and asks the Virgin Mary to pray for their intentions, Anglican prayer beads are most often used as a tactile aid to prayer and as a counting device. The standard Anglican set consists of the following pattern, starting with the cross, followed by the Invitatory Bead, and subsequently, the first Cruciform bead, moving to the right, through the first set of seven beads to the next Cruciform bead, continuing around the circle. He or she may conclude by saying the Lord's prayer on the invitatory bead and/or a final prayer on the cross as in the examples below. The entire circle may be done thrice, which signifies the Holy Trinity.[5]

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^ Mary: The Imagination of Her Heart by Penelope Duckworth 2004 ISBN 1-56101-260-2 page 118
  4. ^ The Rosary for Episcopalians/Anglicans by Thomas Schultz 2003 ISBN 1-58790-055-6
  5. ^ a b
  6. ^

External links

  • Christian Prayer Beads Central
  • Anglican Prayer Beads
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