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Annika Sörenstam

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Annika Sörenstam

Annika Sörenstam
— Golfer —
Sörenstam at the 2008 LPGA Championship
Personal information
Full name Annika Sörenstam
Born (1970-10-09) 9 October 1970
Bro, Stockholm County, Sweden
Height 5 ft 6 in (1.68 m)
Nationality  Sweden
Residence Orlando, Florida, U.S.
Spouse David Esch (1997–2005)
Mike McGee (m. 2009)
Children Ava McGee (b. 2009)
William McGee (b. 2011)
Career
College University of Arizona
(two years)
Turned professional 1992
Retired 2008
Current tour(s) LPGA Tour (joined 1994)
Ladies European Tour
Professional wins 93
Number of wins by tour
LPGA Tour 72 (3rd all time)
Ladies European Tour 17 (5th all-time)
LPGA of Japan Tour 2
ALPG Tour 4
Other 3
Best results in LPGA major championships
(Wins: 10)
ANA Inspiration Won: 2001, 2002, 2005
LPGA Championship Won: 2003, 2004, 2005
U.S. Women's Open Won: 1995, 1996, 2006
du Maurier Classic 2nd: 1998
Women's British Open Won: 2003
Achievements and awards
World Golf Hall of Fame 2003 (member page)
LPGA Tour
Rookie of the Year
1994
LPGA Tour
Player of the Year
1995, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005
LPGA Vare Trophy 1995, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2005
LPGA Tour
Money Winner
1995, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005
Ladies European Tour
Rookie of the Year
1993
Ladies European Tour
Order of Merit
1995
Ladies European Tour
Player of the Year
1995, 2002
(For a full list of awards, see here)

Annika Sörenstam (pronounced ;    ; born 9 October 1970) is a Swedish retired professional golfer whose achievements rank her as one of the most successful female golfers in history.[1] Before stepping away from competitive golf at the end of the 2008 season, she won 90 international tournaments as a professional, making her the female golfer with the most wins to her name. She has won 72 official LPGA tournaments including ten majors and 18 other tournaments internationally, and she tops the LPGA's career money list with earnings of over $22 million—over $3 million ahead of her nearest rival. Since 2006, Sörenstam has held dual American and Swedish citizenship.[2]

The winner of a record eight Player of the Year awards, and six Vare Trophies given to the LPGA player with the lowest seasonal scoring average, she is the only female golfer to shoot a 59 in competition. She holds various all-time scoring records including the lowest season scoring average: 68.6969 in 2004.

Representing Europe in the Solheim Cup on eight occasions between 1994 and 2007, Sörenstam was the event's all-time leading points earner until her record was surpassed by England's Laura Davies during the 2011 Solheim Cup.

Sörenstam made history at the Bank of America Colonial tournament in 2003 as the first woman to play in a PGA Tour event since 1945. Her growing off-course interests include the ANNIKA golf academy, golf course design, ANNIKA-branded products, and a charitable foundation.

Contents

  • Childhood and amateur career 1
  • Professional career 2
    • 1990s 2.1
    • 2000s 2.2
    • Retirement 2.3
  • Business career 3
    • Golf course design 3.1
    • The ANNIKA Academy 3.2
    • Other business ventures 3.3
  • Personal life 4
  • Professional wins (93) 5
    • LPGA Tour (72) 5.1
    • Ladies European Tour (17) 5.2
    • ALPG Tour (4) 5.3
    • LPGA of Japan Tour (2) 5.4
    • Other (3) 5.5
  • Major championships 6
    • Wins (10) 6.1
    • Results timeline 6.2
    • Summary 6.3
  • LPGA Tour record 7
  • World ranking 8
  • Team appearances 9
    • Solheim Cup record 9.1
  • Awards 10
  • See also 11
  • Notes and references 12
  • External links 13

Childhood and amateur career

Sörenstam was born in Bro near Stockholm, Sweden.[3] Her father Tom is a retired IBM executive, her mother Gunilla worked in a bank and her younger sister Charlotta is a professional golfer who coaches at her sister's academy.[4] Annika and Charlotta Sörenstam are the only two sisters to have both won $1 million on the LPGA.

As a child, Sörenstam was a talented all-round sportsgirl. She was a nationally ranked junior tennis player, played football (soccer) in her hometown team Bro IK and was such a good skier that the coach of the Swedish national ski team suggested the family move to Northern Sweden to improve her skiing year round.[3][5][6] At the age of 12, she switched to golf, sharing her first set of golf clubs with her sister—Annika got the odd numbered clubs and Charlotta the even—and earned her first handicap of 54.[3] She was so shy as a junior she used to deliberately three putt at the end of a tournament to avoid giving the victory speech.[7] The coaches noticed and at the next tournament both the winner and the runner-up had to give a speech. Sörenstam decided that if she were going to have to face the crowd anyway she might as well win and the deliberate misses stopped.[3]

Her successful amateur career included a win in the St. Rule Trophy played at St. Andrews and a runner-up finish in the Swedish national mother/daughter golf tournament.[8][9] As a member of the Swedish National Team from 1987 to 1992, she played in the 1990 and 1992 Espirito Santo Trophy World Amateur Golf Team Championships, becoming World Amateur champion in 1992.[10][11] While waiting to start college in Sweden, Sörenstam worked as a personal assistant at the Swedish PGA and played on the Swedish Ladies Telia Tour, winning three tournaments during 1990/1991.[12][13][14][15]

After a coach spotted Sörenstam playing in a collegiate event in Tokyo, she moved to the United States to attend college at the University of Arizona.[3] She won seven collegiate titles and in 1991, became the first non-American and first freshman to win the individual NCAA National Championship.[9][16] She was 1991 NCAA Co-Player of the Year with Kelly Robbins, runner-up in the 1992 NCAA National Championship, 1992 Pac-10 champion and a 1991–92 NCAA All-American.[3][17][18] At the 1992 United States Women's Amateur Golf Championship, she was the runner-up to Vicki Goetze and thus received an invitation to play in the 1992 U.S. Women's Open, where she finished tied for 63rd.[19] Having turned professional in 1992 and missing her LPGA Tour card at the LPGA Final Qualifying Tournament by one shot, she began her professional career on the Ladies European Tour or LET, formerly known as the WPGET.[3]

Professional career

1990s

Sörenstam was invited to play in three 1993 LPGA tournaments where she finished T38th, 4th, and T9th earning more than $47,000.[20] She finished second four times on the Ladies European Tour and was 1993 Ladies European Tour Rookie of the Year.[21] By tying for 28th at the LPGA Final Qualifying Tournament she earned non-exempt status for the 1994 season.[3] Sörenstam's first professional win came at the 1994 Holden Women's Australian Open on the ALPG Tour.[22] In the United States, Sörenstam was LPGA Rookie of the Year, had three top-10 finishes including a tie for second at the Women's British Open and made her Solheim Cup debut.[21][23]

Sörenstam at the Women's British Open 2007

1995 was her breakout year when she won her first LPGA Tour title at the U.S. Women's Open.[3] She finished at the top of the Money List[24] and was the first non-American winner of the Vare Trophy.[25] She became the second player ever to be Player of the Year and Vare Trophy winner the year after being Rookie of the Year.[26] A win at the 1995 Australian Ladies Masters[27] and two other wins on the Ladies European Tour put her top of the LET Order of Merit and made her the first player to top both the European and LPGA Tour money lists in the same season.[21][28] Her success worldwide resulted in her winning the Jerringpriset award in Sweden,[29] the country's most prestigious award in sports as well as being awarded the Svenska Dagbladet Gold Medal.[30]

1996 saw Sörenstam win her home LET tournament, the Trygg Hansa Ladies' Open in Sweden and three LPGA tournaments including the U.S. Women's Open.[31] In defending her title, she became the first non-American to win back to back U.S. Women's Open titles,[3] passed the $1 million mark in LPGA career earnings, and won her second consecutive Vare Trophy.[20]

She won six 1997 LPGA titles regaining the Money List and Player of the Year titles. Internationally, she won on the JLPGA and defended her home LET title at the renamed Compaq Open. She became the first player in LPGA history to finish a season with a sub-70 scoring average of 69.99 en route to retaining the 1998 Player of the Year and Money List titles as well as winning the LET Swedish tour stop for the third time running.[25] September 1999 saw Sörenstam change her on-course team replacing her caddie of six years, Colin Cann, with Terry McNamara.[32][33]

2000s

At this point in her career, Sörenstam says she lost focus having reached her biggest goals.[3] Karrie Webb became the best LPGA Tour player but Sörenstam still managed to win more LPGA tournaments than any other Tour player during the 1990s.[26] She qualified for the World Golf Hall of Fame when she won the 2000 Welch's/Circle K Championship, but was not eligible for induction until finishing her tenth year on the LPGA tour in October 2003.[34][35] Sörenstam was the first international player to be inducted into the Hall of Fame through the LPGA criteria.[35][36][37]

Having lost her preeminent position, Sörenstam embarked on a new five-day-a-week exercise program including weight-lifting and balance work which by 2003 added over 20 yards (18 m) to her driving distance.[38][39] During the 2001 season, she had eight LPGA wins, became the only female golfer to shoot a 59 in competition and the first LPGA player to cross the $2 million mark in single-season earnings.[24][40] She set or tied a total of 30 LPGA records en route to regaining the Vare Trophy and winning her fourth Player of the Year and Money List titles in 2001. In a made-for-TV alternate shot competition between the two best male and female players in the world, Sörenstam and Tiger Woods beat Karrie Webb and David Duval.[41]

Sörenstam at the Women's British Open 2004

At the end of that season Karrie Webb said she "would eat her hat" if Sörenstam repeated her eight wins in 2002.[42] Sörenstam accomplished that feat, joining Mickey Wright as the only players to win 11 LPGA tournaments in one season, earning her fifth Player of the Year title and fifth Vare Trophy. She successfully defended the Kraft Nabisco Championship, her fourth major victory,[43] and also won the ANZ Ladies Masters in Australia[44] and Compaq Open in Sweden on the Ladies European Tour giving her 13 wins in 25 starts worldwide in 2002.[45]

Amid notable controversy, Sörenstam was invited to play in the Bank of America Colonial golf tournament in Fort Worth, Texas, beginning 22 May 2003, making her the first woman to play in a PGA Tour event since Babe Zaharias, who qualified for the 1945 Los Angeles Open.[46] PGA Tour player Vijay Singh was particularly critical of her presence; he was quoted saying she had no business playing and he hoped she missed the cut, although this statement was later proven to be misquoted and he later apologized.[47][48] Cheered through each hole, she shot five over par, tying for 96th out of the 111 who finished the first two rounds, missing the cut. After shooting 1-over-par 71 in the first round, finishing in 73rd and on pace to challenge for a weekend spot, Sörenstam said she was nervous all day but pleased by her performance.[49] Through the first round she led the field in driving accuracy, was in the top 20 in greens in regulation, and was 84th out of 111 in driving distance. Unfortunately, poor putting (last in the field, averaging over a two-putt) cost her a spot on the first page of the first round leaderboard and ultimately caused her to miss the cut.[50]

Later in the 2003 season, she won the LPGA Championship and the Women's British Open,[51] becoming only the sixth player to complete the LPGA Career Grand Slam.[52] She had five other victories worldwide, set or tied a total of 22 LPGA records and earned her sixth Player of the Year award. She competed against Fred Couples, Phil Mickelson and Mark O'Meara in the 2003 Skins Game, finishing second with five skins worth $225,000; Sörenstam holed a 39-yard (36 m) bunker shot on the ninth hole—the eighth eagle in Skins Game history.[53] In September, she was part of the winning European Solheim Cup team in her native Sweden. She was awarded her second Jerringpriset award in Sweden[54] plus the 2003 Golf Writers' Trophy by the Association of Golf Writers.[55]

Sörenstam's dominance continued in 2004 with her seventh LPGA Player of the Year award tying Kathy Whitworth for the most in LPGA history. She posted 16 top-10 finishes in 18 LPGA starts, including eight wins, had two additional international wins, became the first player to reach $15 million in LPGA career earnings and took her own LPGA single-season scoring average record to 68.69696, but played too few rounds to win the Vare Trophy.[56] The Women's Sports Foundation gave her the 2004 Sportswoman of the Year Award,[36] and the Laureus World Sports Academy named her World Sportswoman of the Year.[57] She also released a combination autobiography and golf instructional book, Golf Annika's Way.[58]

2005 was a landmark year in Sörenstam's life both on and off the golf course. In February that year she announced that she had filed for divorce from David Esch, her husband of eight years, and this was finalised in August but it did not adversely affect her golf.[59][60] Her achievements included being the first player in LPGA history to win a major three consecutive years at the LPGA Championship[61] and the first golfer in LPGA or PGA history to win the same event five consecutive years at the Mizuno Classic.[62] 11 wins in 21 tournaments entered worldwide included victory in the Scandinavian TPC hosted by Annika[63] where she presented herself the trophy, giving her an eighth Money List title, tying the LPGA record, an eighth Rolex Player of the Year (POY) award (a record) and a sixth Vare Trophy.[25][64] She is the only LPGA player ever to win Money List, POY award and Vare trophy in the same year in 5 different years.[65] Team competition saw her make her seventh consecutive Solheim Cup appearance, her 4 points making her total 21, the event's all-time leading points earner,[66][67] and the inaugural Lexus Cup was played with Sörenstam as the Captain of the victorious International Team.[68]

Sörenstam at the Women's British Open 2004

These events resulted in her receiving numerous awards. The Golf Writers Association of America named Sörenstam Female Player of the Year for the eighth time (1995,1997, 2000–2005),[69][70][71] Associated Press voted her Female Athlete of the Year for the third consecutive year[72][73][74] and she became the first woman to win the Golf Writers' Trophy twice in the 55-year history of European golf's most prestigious award.[75] Having previously won six Best Female Golfer ESPY Awards (1996, 1998–99, 2002–04), Sörenstam also received the 2005 ESPY Award as Best Female Athlete[76][77][78][79]

When the first-ever official Women's World Golf Rankings were unveiled in February 2006, Sörenstam was confirmed as the number-one player in women's golf, a position she relinquished to Lorena Ochoa on 22 April 2007.[80][81] In partnership with Liselotte Neumann in team Sweden, she won the Women's World Cup of Golf, opened her LPGA season with a defence of her title in the MasterCard Classic. She then went winless in eight starts, causing some to talk of a slump.[82][83] Her winning drought ended at the U.S. Women's Open, where she won an 18-hole playoff over Pat Hurst for her 10th major championship title, tying her for third on the list of players with most major championship titles.[84] She totalled 3 wins on the LPGA and two on the Ladies European Tour, the inaugural Dubai Ladies Masters and the Swedish tournament she hosts, which she defended in her home town at the course where she learned to play.[85][86] Her International team lost the second Lexus Cup competition to Team Asia.[87]

Sörenstam started 2007 by losing a playoff while defending of her MasterCard Classic title.[88] At the Kraft Nabisco Championship she shot her highest 72-hole score in a major in nine years,[89] a result explained by her subsequent diagnosis with ruptured and bulging discs in her neck, the first major injury in Sörenstam's 13-year LPGA career.[90][91] After a two-month injury rehabilitation break, Sörenstam returned as the Ginn Tribute tournament hostess where she admitted to being at only 85% fitness and finished tied for 36th place.[92] She was still not fully fit in her next two tournaments, the LPGA Championship where she finished tied for 15th place, and the US Women's Open, where, as defending champion, she finished tied for 32nd.[93]

After an early round defeat at the World Matchplay Championship, Sörenstam finished sixth at the Evian Masters, 16th at the Women's British Open and ninth in the Swedish tournament she hosts on the Ladies European Tour.[94] On her return to the US, Sörenstam had three top ten finishes but missed the weekend at the season closing ADT Playoffs for the second year running. However, Sörenstam did win a worldwide title at the Dubai Ladies Masters on the Ladies European Tour in November 2007.[95][96]

Declaring herself recovered from injury and ready to return to a complete season of competitive golf in 2008, Sörenstam opened the year at the SBS Open at Turtle Bay where she captured her 70th LPGA Tour victory and first since September 2006.[97] She won next at the Stanford International Pro-Am in April then following a week off, won again at the Michelob ULTRA Open at Kingsmill in a tournament record score, giving her three wins and over $1 million in earnings by mid-May. It was her 72nd and final ever win on the LPGA Tour.

In 2008, Sörenstam was highly critical of other female golfers who tried to play in the PGA Tour – her comments to Michelle Wie for playing on the men's tour: "I really don't know why Michelle continues to do this. We have a major this week and, if you can't qualify for a major, I don't see any reason why you should play with the men."[98]

Retirement

On 13 May 2008, Sörenstam announced at a press conference at the Sybase Classic that she would "step away" from competitive golf at the conclusion of the 2008 season. That night, she threw out the first pitch of the Washington Nationals/New York Mets baseball game at Shea Stadium in New York and the following day read the Top Ten on the Late Show with David Letterman.[99] Her last tournament victory came in a playoff at the Suzhou Taihu Ladies Open, an event co-sanctioned by the Ladies European Tour and the Ladies Asian Golf tour.[100] Her last scheduled tournament on the LPGA Tour was the season-ending ADT Championship in November, where she failed to make the weekend play in the event's unique playoff structure. Her final sanctioned LPGA appearance was as the winning captain of Team International at the 2008 Lexus Cup in Singapore.[101] Her last professional tournament was the Dubai Ladies Masters on the Ladies European Tour in December 2008,[102] where she finished tied for 7th.

Business career

Sörenstam began the transition from professional golfer to entrepreneur during the later years of her career, attempting to combine golf, fitness and charitable works into various businesses under the ANNIKA brand with the brand statement "Share my Passion". They are all promoted by her website on which there is a blog to which she and her staff regularly contribute.[38][103][104][105]

Golf course design

Sörenstam has undertaken a number of golf course design projects. Her first, the Annika Course, was completed at Mission Hills Golf Club in Shenzen, China, in 2003; the second was officially launched in January 2006 and opened in 2008 at Euphoria Golf Estate & Hydro in South Africa.[106][107][108] She recently announced a new project at Mines Golf City, near Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Projects closer to home include a redesign of the Patriots Point Links Course near Charleston, South Carolina and a course at Red Mountain Resort, British Columbia.[6][109] She and Jack Nicklaus lost out on their bid to build the Olympic golf course in Rio to Gil Hanse and his consultant Amy Alcott.[110]

The ANNIKA Academy

The ANNIKA Academy at Ginn Reunion Resort in Reunion, Florida began construction in 2006 and opened in April 2007 with Sörenstam's longtime coach Henri Reis serving as head instructor, her sister Charlotta an instructor and club fitter, her personal trainer Kai Fusser focusing on overall fitness training, and with Sorenstam available for coaching on certain golfing packages.[7][111] The opening ceremony included a Make-A-Wish Foundation golf clinic conducted by Sörenstam who is a United States ambassador for the Make-A-Wish Foundation and it also hosted clinics for junior golfers during The Annika Invitational, an American Junior Golf Association invitation-only event featuring the top 60 girls from around the world hosted by The ANNIKA Foundation.[112][113][113]

Other business ventures

Other branches of the ANNIKA business include a clothing line with Cutter & Buck,[114] a limited label wine produced in partnership with Wente Vineyards,[115] and a signature fragrance developed by SA Fragrances.[116] Sörenstam also hosted the Ginn Tribute Hosted by Annika, an event on the LPGA Tour in 2007 and 2008, and the Scandinavian TPC hosted by Annika on the Ladies European Tour during its last four years from 2005 through 2008. She won the latter tournament in 2005 and 2006. Both tournaments had their last event in 2008.

One of Sörenstam's hobbies is cooking. She has participated in cooking demonstrations during LPGA tournaments and has talked about enrolling in cooking school.[117][118] Before the 2003 season Sörenstam took the opportunity to improve her culinary skills by working eight-hour shifts in the kitchens of the Lake Nona Country Club.[119] Sörenstam has had a serious interest in investments, real estate and the stock market since she earned her first LPGA check and in August 2006 was invited to ring the closing bell at the New York Stock Exchange.[120][121]

Personal life

Sörenstam at the Women's British Open 2005

Sörenstam has been described as an atheist.[122] She met her first husband David Esch in 1994 on the driving range at Moon Valley Country Club, Phoenix, Arizona, where she was an LPGA rookie practicing for a tournament and he worked for club manufacturer Ping.[123] They were engaged at the 1995 Evian Masters, married in Lake Tahoe on 4 January 1997, and were divorced in 2005.[59][124] In August 2007 she married Mike McGee, the managing director for the ANNIKA brand of businesses and son of former PGA Tour and Champions Tour player Jerry McGee, at Lake Nona Golf & Country Club in Orlando, Florida on 10 January 2009.[102][125][126][127]

Their daughter Ava Madelyn McGee was born 1 September 2009.[128] On 21 March 2011, Sörenstam gave birth to a son, William Nicholas McGee, several weeks prematurely.[129]

Professional wins (93)

LPGA Tour (72)

Legend
Major championships (10)
Other LPGA Tour (62)
No. Date Tournament Winning score Margin of
victory
Runner(s)-up
1 16 Jul 1995 U.S. Women's Open −2 (67-71-72-68=278) 1 stroke Meg Mallon
2 24 Sep 1995 GHP Heartland Classic −10 (69-67-70-72=278) 10 strokes Jan Stephenson
3 15 Oct 1995 Samsung World Championship of Women's Golf −6 (72-69-71-70=282) Playoff Laura Davies
4 2 Jun 1996 U.S. Women's Open −8 (70-67-69-66=272) 6 strokes Kris Tschetter
5 13 Oct 1996 CoreStates Betsy King Classic −18 (66-69-67-68=270) 8 strokes Laura Davies
6 20 Oct 1996 Samsung World Championship of Women's Golf −14 (66-69-69-70=274) 1 stroke Helen Alfredsson
7 12 Jan 1997 Chrysler-Plymouth Tournament of Champions −16 (72-66-68-66=272) 4 strokes Karrie Webb
8 22 Feb 1997 Cup Noodles Hawaiian Ladies Open −10 (67-66-73=206) 1 stroke Meg Mallon
9 6 Apr 1997 Longs Drugs Challenge −3 (73-68-71-73=285) Playoff Pam Kometani
10 1 Jun 1997 Michelob Light Classic −11 (70-69-66-72=277) 3 strokes Hiromi Kobayashi
11 5 Oct 1997 CoreStates Betsy King Classic −14 (70-67-68-69=274) 2 strokes Kelly Robbins
12 23 Nov 1997 ITT LPGA Tour Championship −11 (72-68-67-70=277) Playoff Lorie Kane
Pat Hurst
13 7 Jun 1998 Michelob Light Classic −8 (67-73-68=208) Playoff Donna Andrews
14 28 Jun 1998 ShopRite LPGA Classic −17 (66-65-65=196) 4 strokes Juli Inkster
15 19 Jul 1998 JAL Big Apple Classic −19 (67-66-65-67=265) 8 strokes Joan Pitcock
16 13 Sep 1998 Safeco Classic −15 (68-70-67-68=273) 5 strokes Laura Davies
Patty Sheehan
17 11 Jul 1999 Michelob Light Classic −10 (68-72-68-70=278) Playoff Tina Barrett
18 3 Oct 1999 New Albany Golf Classic −19 (68-66-69-66=269) 3 strokes Mardi Lunn
19 13 Mar 2000 Welch's/Circle K Championship −19 (67-68-67-67=269) Playoff Pat Hurst
20 21 May 2000 Firstar LPGA Classic -19 (66-65-66=197) 1 stroke Cristie Kerr
Karrie Webb
21 17 Jun 2000 Evian Masters −12 (70-68-70-68=276) Playoff Karrie Webb
22 9 Jul 2000 Jamie Farr Kroger Classic −10 (70-67-66-71=274) Playoff Rachel Hetherington
23 16 Jul 2000 Japan Airlines Big Apple Classic −7 (69-65-72=206) 1 stroke Rosie Jones
24 11 Mar 2001 Welch's/Circle K Championship −23 (65-68-67-65=265) 6 strokes Se Ri Pak
Michelle McGann
Laura Diaz
Dottie Pepper
25 18 Mar 2001 Standard Register PING −27 (65-59-69-68=261) 2 strokes Se Ri Pak
26 25 Mar 2001 Nabisco Championship −7 (72-70-70-69=281) 3 strokes Karrie Webb
Janice Moodie
Dottie Pepper
Akiko Fukushima
Rachel Teske
27 14 Apr 2001 The Office Depot −6 (71-73-66=210) Playoff Mi Hyun Kim
28 6 May 2001 Chick-fil-A Charity Championship −13 (70-66-67=203) Playoff Sophie Gustafson
29 19 Aug 2001 Bank of Montreal Canadian Women's Open −16 (71-68-64-69=272) 2 strokes Kelly Robbins
30 28 Oct 2001 Cisco World Ladies Match Play Championship 1 up Se Ri Pak
31 4 Nov 2001 Mizuno Classic −13 (66-67-70=203) 3 strokes Laura Davies
32 2 Mar 2002 LPGA Takefuji Classic −14 (64-66-66=196) Playoff Lorie Kane
33 31 Mar 2002 Kraft Nabisco Championship −8 (70-71-71-68=280) 1 stroke Liselotte Neumann
34 12 May 2002 Aerus Electrolux USA Championship −17 (65-72-70-64=271) 1 stroke Pat Hurst
35 2 Jun 2002 Kellogg-Keebler Classic −21 (63-67-65=195) 11 strokes Michele Redman
Mhairi McKay
Danielle Ammaccapane
36 15 Jun 2002 Evian Masters −19 (68-67-65-69=269) 4 strokes Maria Hjorth
Mi Hyun Kim
37 30 Jun 2002 ShopRite LPGA Classic −12 (68-67-66=201) 3 strokes Carin Koch
Kate Golden
38 8 Sep 2002 Williams Championship −11 (68-66-65=199) 4 strokes Lorie Kane
39 15 Sep 2002 Safeway Classic −17 (69-62-68=199) 1 stroke Kate Golden
40 6 Oct 2002 Samsung World Championship −22 (66-67-68-65=266) 6 strokes Cristie Kerr
41 10 Nov 2002 Mizuno Classic −15 (69-65-67=201) 2 strokes Grace Park
42 24 Nov 2002 ADT Championship −13 (67-70-70-68=275) 3 strokes Rachel Teske
43 6 Apr 2003 The Office Depot Championship −5 (68-72-71=211) 4 strokes Se Ri Pak
Pat Hurst
Heather Bowie
44 1 Jun 2003 Kellogg-Keebler Classic −17 (62-66-71=199) 3 strokes Mhairi McKay
45 8 Jun 2003 McDonald's LPGA Championship −6 (70-64-72-72=278) Playoff Grace Park
46 3 Aug 2003 Weetabix Women's British Open −10 (68-72-68-70=278) 1 stroke Se Ri Pak
47 28 Sep 2003 Safeway Classic −15 (67-68-66=201) 1 stroke Beth Daniel
48 9 Oct 2003 Mizuno Classic −24 (63-63-66=192) 9 strokes Grace Park
Se Ri Pak
Sophie Gustafson
49 21 Mar 2004 Safeway International −18 (67-65-68-70=270) 4 strokes Cristie Kerr
50 4 Apr 2004 Office Depot Championship −9 (68-70-69=207) 3 strokes Ashli Bunch
Meg Mallon
51 30 May 2004 LPGA Corning Classic −18 (65-67-70-68=270) 2 strokes Vicki Goetze-Ackerman
Michelle Estill
52 13 Jun 2004 McDonald's LPGA Championship −13 (68-67-64-72=271) 3 strokes Shi Hyun Ahn
53 12 Sep 2004 John Q. Hammons Hotel Classic −9 (66-68-70=204) 4 strokes Shi Hyun Ahn
54 17 Oct 2004 Samsung World Championship −18 (66-68-69-67=270) 3 strokes Grace Park
55 7 Nov 2004 Mizuno Classic −22 (62-66-65=194) 9 strokes Michie Ohba
Grace Park
Ai Miyazato
56 21 Nov 2004 ADT Championship −13 (66-68-72-69=275) Playoff Cristie Kerr
57 6 Mar 2005 MasterCard Classic −7 (70-71-68=209) 3 strokes Karrie Webb
58 20 Mar 2005 Safeway International −11 (66-69-72-70=277) Playoff Lorena Ochoa
59 27 Mar 2005 Kraft Nabisco Championship −15 (70-69-66-68=273) 8 strokes Rosie Jones
60 15 May 2005 Chick-fil-A Charity Championship −23 (67-64-67-67=265) 10 strokes Candie Kung
61 5 Jun 2005 ShopRite LPGA Classic −17 (67-65-64=196) 4 strokes Juli Inkster
62 12 Jun 2005 McDonald's LPGA Championship −11 (68-67-69-73=277) 3 strokes Michelle Wie
63 18 Sep 2005 John Q. Hammons Hotel Classic −5 (68-67-73=208) 1 stroke Paula Creamer
64 16 Oct 2005 Samsung World Championship −18 (64-71-66-69=270) 8 strokes Paula Creamer
65 6 Nov 2005 Mizuno Classic −21 (64-67-64=195) 3 strokes Jennifer Rosales
66 20 Nov 2005 ADT Championship −6 (69-70-74-69=282) 2 strokes Soo-Yun Kang
Michele Redman
Liselotte Neumann
67 12 Mar 2006 MasterCard Classic −8 (67-71-70=208) 1 stroke Helen Alfredsson
Seon Hwa Lee
68 2 Jul 2006 U.S. Women's Open E (69-71-73-71=284) Playoff Pat Hurst
69 3 Sep 2006 State Farm Classic −19 (70-68-69-62=269) 2 strokes Cristie Kerr
70 16 Feb 2008 SBS Open at Turtle Bay −10 (70-67-69=206) 2 strokes Russy Gulyanamitta
Laura Diaz
Jane Park
71 27 Apr 2008 Stanford International Pro-Am −8 (68-67-70-70=275) Playoff Paula Creamer
72 11 May 2008 Michelob ULTRA Open at Kingsmill −19 (64-66-69-66=265) 7 strokes Allison Fouch
Karen Stupples
Jeong Jang
Christina Kim
LPGA Tour playoff record (16–6)
No. Year Tournament Opponent(s) Result
1 1995 Samsung World Championship of Women's Golf Laura Davies Won with birdie on first extra hole
2 1997 Longs Drugs Challenge Pam Kometani Won with par on second extra hole
3 1997 ITT LPGA Tour Championship Pat Hurst
Lorie Kane
Won with par on third extra hole
Hurst eliminated with par on first hole
4 1998 Michelob Light Classic Donna Andrews Won with birdie on second extra hole
5 1998 First Union Betsy King Classic Rachel Hetherington Lost to birdie on first extra hole
6 1999 Valley of the Stars Championship Catrin Nilsmark Lost to par on second extra hole
7 1999 Michelob Light Classic Tina Barrett Won with birdie on third extra hole
8 2000 LPGA Takefuji Classic Karrie Webb Lost to birdie on first extra hole
9 2000 Welch's/Circle K Championship Pat Hurst Won with birdie on second extra hole
10 2000 Evian Masters Karrie Webb Won with eagle on first extra hole
11 2000 Jamie Farr Kroger Classic Rachel Hetherington Won with birdie on second extra hole
12 2001 The Office Depot Mi-Hyun Kim Won with par on first extra hole
13 2001 Chick-fil-A Charity Championship Sophie Gustafson Won with par on second extra hole
14 2002 LPGA Takefuji Classic Lori Kane Won with birdie on first extra hole
15 2002 PING Banner Health Rachel Teske Lost to birdie on second extra hole
16 2003 McDonald's LPGA Championship Grace Park Won with par on first extra hole
17 2003 Giant Eagle LPGA Classic Lorie Kane, Jennifer Rosales, Rachel Teske Teske won with birdie on third extra hole
18 2004 ADT Championship Cristie Kerr Won with bogey on first extra hole
19 2005 Safeway International Lorena Ochoa Won with par on first extra hole
20 2006 U.S. Women's Open Pat Hurst Won 18-hole playoff (Sörenstam:70, Hurst:74)
21 2007 MasterCard Classic Meaghan Francella Lost to birdie on fourth extra hole
22 2008 Stanford International Pro-Am Paula Creamer Won with par on first extra hole

LPGA majors are shown in bold.

Ladies European Tour (17)

Ladies European Tour Majors are shown in bold. The Evian Masters is classified as a major by the LET but not the LPGA Tour, and along with the Women's British Open is co-sanctioned by the LPGA Tour, with wins counting for both tours.

ALPG Tour (4)

LPGA of Japan Tour (2)

Other (3)

Major championships

Wins (10)

Year Championship Winning score Margin Runner(s)-up
1995 U.S. Women's Open −2 (67-71-72-68=278) 1 stroke Meg Mallon
1996 U.S. Women's Open −8 (70-67-69-66=272) 6 strokes Kris Tschetter
2001 Championship, NabiscoNabisco Championship −7 (72-70-70-69=281) 3 strokes Akiko Fukushima, Rachel Hetherington, Janice Moodie,
Dottie Pepper, Karrie Webb
2002 Kraft Nabisco Championship −8 (70-71-71-68=280) 1 stroke Liselotte Neumann
2003 McDonald's LPGA Championship −6 (70-64-72-72=278) Playoff 1 Grace Park
2003 Weetabix Women's British Open −10 (68-72-68-70=278) 1 stroke Se Ri Pak
2004 McDonald's LPGA Championship −17 (68-67-64-72=271) 3 strokes Shi Hyun Ahn
2005 Kraft Nabisco Championship −15 (70-69-66-68=273) 8 strokes Rosie Jones
2005 McDonald's LPGA Championship −11 (68-67-69-73=277) 3 strokes Michelle Wie
2006 U.S. Women's Open E (69-71-73-71=284) Playoff 2 Pat Hurst

1 Defeated Grace Park with par on first extra hole
2 Defeated Hurst in 18-hole playoff: Sörenstam (70), Hurst (74)

Results timeline

Tournament 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000
Kraft Nabisco Championship DNP DNP DNP T24 T2 T8 T7 T7 T17
LPGA Championship DNP DNP DNP 10 T14 3 T30 T16 T12
U.S. Women's Open T64 DNP DNP 1 1 CUT T41 CUT T9
du Maurier Classic DNP DNP T22 T45 T6 CUT 2 DNP 3
Tournament 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
Kraft Nabisco Championship 1 1 2 T13 1 T6 T31 T2
LPGA Championship 5 3 1 1 1 T9 T15 T3
U.S. Women's Open T16 2 4 2 T23 1 T32 T24
Women's British Open ^ T32 CUT 1 13 T5 T31 T16 T24

^ The Women's British Open replaced the du Maurier Classic as an LPGA major in 2001
DNP = did not play
CUT = missed the half-way cut
"T" = tied for place
Green background for wins. Yellow background for top-10.

Summary

  • Starts – 57
  • Wins – 10
  • 2nd place finishes – 6
  • 3rd place finishes – 4
  • Top 3 finishes – 20
  • Top 5 finishes – 23
  • Top 10 finishes – 31
  • Top 25 finishes – 46
  • Missed cuts – 4
  • Most consecutive cuts made – 24
  • Longest streak of top-10s – 4 (4 times)

LPGA Tour record

Year Tournaments
played
Cuts
made*
Wins 2nd 3rd Top 10s Best
finish
Earnings
(US$)
Money
list rank
Scoring
average
Scoring
rank
1992 1 1 0 0 0 0 T64 n/a 77.00
1993 3 3 0 0 0 2 4 47,319 n/a (90) 71.09 n/a (5)
1994 18 14 0 1 0 3 T2 127,451 39 71.90 17
1995 19 19 3 3 1 12 1 666,533 1 71.00 1
1996 20 20 3 2 1 14 1 808,311 3 70.47 1
1997 22 20 6 5 3 16 1 1,236,789 1 70.04 2
1998 21 21 4 4 2 17 1 1,092,748 1 69.99 1
1999 22 21 5 2 4 15 1 863,816 4 70.40 2
2000 22 22 5 2 4 15 1 1,404,948 2 70.47 2
2001 26 26 8 6 1 20 1 2,105,868 1 69.42 1
2002 23 22 11 3 3 20 1 2,863,904 1 68.70 1
2003 17 17 6 4 1 15 1 2,029,506 1 69.02 1
2004 18 18 8 4 0 16 1 2,544,707 1 68.70 1
2005 20 20 10 2 0 15 1 2,588,240 1 69.33 1
2006 20 19 3 5 1 16 1 1,971,741 3 69.82 2
2007 13 13 0 1 2 6 2 532,718 25 71.27 4
2008 22 22 3 2 1 10 1 1,735,912 4 70.47 2

* Includes matchplay and other events without a cut.

World ranking

Position in Women's World Golf Rankings at the end of each calendar year.
Year Ranking
2006 1[130]
2007 4[131]
2008 3[132]

On 12 January 2009, Sörenstam, who was ranked third the previous week despite having announced her retirement effective at the end of the 2008 season, was removed from the rankings. No official explanation was given for her removal. Sörenstam later posted in her personal blog that she asked to be removed.[133]

Team appearances

Amateur

Professional

Solheim Cup record

Year Total
matches
Total
W-L-H
Singles
W-L-H
Foursomes
W-L-H
Fourballs
W-L-H
Points
won
Points
%
Career 37 22–11–4 4–3–1 11–3–1 7–5–2 24 64.9
1994 3 1–2–0 0–1–0
lost to T. Green
1–0–0
won w/ C.Nilsmark 1 up
0–1–0
lost w/ C. Nilsmark 6&5
1 33.3
1996 5 3–0–2 1–0–0
def. P. Bradley 2&1
1–0–1
halved w/ C. Nilsmark,
won w/ C. Nilsmark 1 up
1–0–1
won w/ K. Marshall 1 up,
halved w/ T. Johnson
4 80.0
1998 5 3–2–0 1–0–0
def. D. Andrews 2&1
1–1–0
won w/ C. Matthew 3&2,
lost w/ C. Matthew 3&2
1–1–0
lost w/ C. Nilsmark 2 up,
won w/ C. Nilsmark 5&3
3 60.0
2000 4 2–2–0 0–1–0
lost to J. Inkster 5&4
2–0–0
won w/ J. Moodie 1 up,
won w/ J. Moodie 1 up
0–1–0
lost w/ J. Moodie 2&1
2 50.0
2002 5 3–1–1 0–0–1
halved w/ W. Ward
2–0–0
won w/ C Koch 3&2,
won w/ C. Koch 4&3
1–1–0
lost w/ M. Hjorth 2&1,
won w/ C. Koch 4&3
3.5 70.0
2003 5 4–1–0 1–0–0
def. A. Stanford 3&2
2–0–0
won w/ S. Pettersen 4&3,
won w/ C. Koch 3&2
1–1–0
lost w/ C. Koch 1 dn,
won w/ S. Pettersen 1 up
4 80.0
2005 5 4–1–0 1–0–0
def B. Daniel 4&3
1–1–0
won w/ S. Pettersen 1 up,
lost w/ C. Matthew 2 up
2–0–0
won w/ C. Matthew 2&1,
won w/ L. Davies 4&2
4 80.0
2007 5 2–2–1 0–1–0
lost to M. Pressel 2&1
1–1–0
lost w/ C. Matthew 4&2,
won w/ C. Matthew 1 up
1–0–1
halved w/ M. Hjorth,
won w/ S. Pettersen 3&2,
2.5 50.0

Awards

See also

Notes and references

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  5. ^ Claes Lind with Annika Sörenstam, Våga bli bäst or Dare to be the Best, Sportförlaget i Europa AB, 2003, ISBN 91-88541-56-8
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External links

  • Official website
  • Annika Sörenstam at the LPGA Tour official site
  • Annika Sörenstam at the Ladies European Tour official site
  • The ANNIKA Academy at Ginn Reunion Resort
  • Annika Sörenstam bio
Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Liselotte Neumann
LET Order of Merit
1995
Succeeded by
Laura Davies
Preceded by
Swedish national football team
Svenska Dagbladet Gold Medal
1995
Succeeded by
Agneta Andersson & Susanne Gunnarsson
Preceded by
Serena Williams
Laureus World Sports Award for Sportswoman of the Year
2004
Succeeded by
Kelly Holmes
Sporting positions
Preceded by
 —
World No. 1 Ranked Golfer
21 February 2006 – 22 April 2007
Succeeded by
Lorena Ochoa
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