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Apostolic vicariate

An apostolic vicariate is a form of territorial jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Church established in missionary regions and countries where a diocese has not yet been established. It is essentially provisional, though it may last for a century or more. The hope is that the region will generate sufficient numbers of Catholics for the Church to create a diocese. In turn, the status of Apsotolic vicariate is often a promotion for a former apostolic prefecture, while either may have started out as a mission sui iuris.

Contents

  • Institution 1
  • List of Apostolic vicariates 2
    • Europe 2.1
    • The Americas 2.2
    • Asia 2.3
    • Africa 2.4
    • Oceania 2.5
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Institution

An apostolic vicariate is led by a vicar apostolic who is usually a titular bishop. While such a territory can be classed as a particular church, according to canon 371.1 of the Latin Code of Canon Law, a vicar apostolic's jurisdiction is an exercise of the jurisdiction of the Pope — the territory thus comes directly under the pope as "universal bishop", and the pope exercises this authority through a “vicar”. This is unlike the jurisdiction of a diocesan bishop, whose jurisdiction derives directly from his office.

Like any ecclesiastical jurisdiction, an apostolic vicariate may be administered by the bishop of a neighbouring diocese, or by a priest appointed transitionally as an apostolic administrator. As in a regular diocese, the vicar apostolic may appoint priests as vicars exercising limited jurisdiction over the apostolic vicariate. Normally, however, an apostolic vicariate is administered by a titular bishop of its own. When someone who doesn't qualify (notable not ordained as bishop) is appointed ad interim, he may be styled Pro-apostolic vicar.

An apostolic vicariate is to be distinguished from an mission sui iuris, which other than the ones mentioned before is not a particular Church, although it shares some similarities to one; at its head, an ecclesiastical superior is named. The usual sequence of development is mission, apostolic prefecture, apostolic vicariate and finally diocese (or even archdiocese). See also apostolic exarch for an Eastern Catholic counterpart.

The apostolic vicariate is distinguished from a territorial abbacy (or "abbey nullius") — an area not a diocese but under the direction of the abbot of a monastery.

List of Apostolic vicariates

(incomplete)

Inactive apostolic vicariates (and/or former names, often promoted to diocese) are in italics. Eastern Catholic (mostly Byzantine Rite) apostolic vicariates are in bold.

Europe

The Americas

Asia

Africa

Oceania

See also

References

  1. ^ Cheney, David M. "Archdiocese of Seoul". catholic-hierarchy.org. Retrieved 20 August 2015. 

External links

  • List of Current Apostolic Vicariates by GCatholic.org, regularly refreshed
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