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ArenaBowl XXIII

 

ArenaBowl XXIII

ArenaBowl XXIII
180px
1 2 3 4 Total
TB 7 21 7 22 57
SPO 6 28 14 21 69
Date August 20, 2010
Arena Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena, Spokane, Washington
Attendance 11,017
MVP Kyle Rowley, QB, Spokane
Offensive Player of the Game Markee White, WR, Spokane
Defensive Player of the Game Jeremy Geathers, DL, Spokane
Ironman of the Game Huey Whittaker, WR, Spokane
Winning Coach Rob Keefe
Losing Coach Tim Marcum
U.S. TV
Network NFL Network
Announcers Paul Burmeister, Kurt Warner, Anthony Herron, and Ari Wolfe[1]
 < XXII ArenaBowl XXIV > 

NAPA Auto Parts ArenaBowl XXIII was an arena football game between the National Conference champion, Spokane Shock and the American Conference Champion, Tampa Bay Storm. The Spokane Shock won the game successfully defending ArenaCup X of the former af2. The game was played on August 20, 2010, and was held at the Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena in Spokane, Washington, the first non-neutral site since 2004 (ArenaBowl XVIII). The game was shown live on the NFL Network, as well as a tape delay on Eurosport 2. The corporate sponsor was NAPA Auto Parts.

Background

Tampa Bay Storm

See: 2010 Tampa Bay Storm season

Looking for their sixth championship in franchise history, and first since ArenaBowl XVII in 2003, the Tampa Bay Storm succeeded in their first season back since 2008. Led by quarterback Brett Dietz, who threw for 5,054 yards and 106 touchdowns in the regular season (both franchise records), they finished 11–5, 2nd in the South division, and 3rd in the American Conference.

Week Date Opponent Home/Away Result
1 April 3 Tulsa Talons Away L 48–54
2 Bye
3 April 16 Dallas Vigilantes Home W 54–41
4 April 25 Milwaukee Iron Away L 61–72
5 May 1 Arizona Rattlers Home W 62–61
6 May 7 Jacksonville Sharks Home L 43–46
7 May 15 Bossier–Shreveport Battle Wings Away W 48–44
8 May 22 Bye
9 May 28 Orlando Predators Away W 62–50
10 June 5 Oklahoma City Yard Dawgz Home W 50–48
11 June 12 Alabama Vipers Away W 61–55
12 June 19 Utah Blaze Away W 65–40
13 June 25 Bossier–Shreveport Battle Wings Home W 78–39
14 July 2 Chicago Rush Home W 68–60
15 July 9 Dallas Vigilantes Away W 56–34
16 July 16 Jacksonville Sharks Away L 47–49
17 July 24 Alabama Vipers Home W 53–49
18 July 30 Orlando Predators Home L 60–75
August 7 Tulsa Talons Road W 68–38
August 14 Orlando Predators Home W 63–62

Spokane Shock

See: 2010 Spokane Shock season

The Spokane Shock, fresh off their ArenaCup X victory in what would be the last arenafootball2 season, earned their spot in the postseason by going 13–3 in the regular season, the AFL's best record in 2010, which gave them home field advantage throughout the entire playoffs. It's the Shock's first ArenaBowl in franchise history, having three previous ArenaCup appearances in af2.

Week Date Opponent Home/Away Result
1 April 2 Milwaukee Iron Home L 62–74
2 April 9 Utah Blaze Away W 68–34
3 April 17 Bossier–Shreveport Battle Wings Home W 78–70
4 Bye
5 May 1 Cleveland Gladiators Home L 68–72
6 May 7 Arizona Rattlers Away W 63–56
7 May 16 Oklahoma City Yard Dawgz Away W 68–63
8 May 22 Utah Blaze Home W 77–28
9 May 29 Jacksonville Sharks Home W 67–57
10 Bye
11 June 12 Orlando Predators Away W 53–52
12 June 18 Tulsa Talons Home W 63–42
13 June 26 Milwaukee Iron Away W 62–48
14 July 2 Arizona Rattlers Home W 37–36
15 July 10 Cleveland Gladiators Away W 62–56 (OT)
16 July 16 Iowa Barnstormers Away W 62–61
17 July 23 Chicago Rush Home W 63–49
18 July 30 Jacksonville Sharks Away L 49–64
August 6 Arizona Rattlers Home W 57–49
August 12 Milwaukee Iron Home W 60–57

Broadcasting

ArenaBowl XXIII was televised on the NFL Network and Eurosport 2. It was available in 48 countries worldwide. Radio broadcasts were available in the local markets of Tampa Bay and Spokane only.

NFL Network

NFL Network delivered live coverage outside of the United States to these countries:
 Canada
 Mexico
 United Kingdom

Eurosport 2

The AFL had a taped delayed broadcast available in the following countries:
 France
 Ireland
 Italy
 Germany
 Greece
 Hungary
 Russia
 Bulgaria
 Poland
 Portugal
 Romania
 Serbia
 Turkey
Denmark Denmark
 Ukraine
 Croatia

Radio

These were the radio broadcasting groups present:
 WHNZ Tampa Bay

Playoffs

This was the 2010 playoff grid to determine ArenaBowl Champion:

Conference Semifinals Conference Championship ArenaBowl XXIII
                         
1  Jacksonville 69  
4  Orlando 73  
  4  Orlando 62  
American Conference
  3  Tampa Bay 63  
2  Tulsa 38
3  Tampa Bay 68  
    A3  Tampa Bay 57
  N1  Spokane 69
1  Spokane 57  
4  Arizona 49  
  1  Spokane 60
National Conference
  2  Milwaukee 57  
2  Milwaukee 64
3  Chicago 54  

In the opening round of the playoffs, Spokane defeated the Arizona Rattlers 57–49,[2] while the Storm took care of the Tulsa Talons 68–38.[3] In the National Conference Championship game, Spokane edged out the Milwaukee Iron 60–57.[4] In another close contest, the Storm knocked off rival Orlando 63–62 in the first playoff meeting of The War on I-4 since 2003, winning the American Conference Championship and punching their ticket to ArenaBowl XXIII.[5]

Game Summary

First Half

The Tampa Bay Storm received the opening kickoff, driving 45 yards in 11 plays to take a 7–0 lead on a three-yard run by Eric Ortiz. But this would be the only time in the game the Storm would lead by more than one point.

Spokane scored the next three touchdowns to take a 20–7 lead. Huey Whittaker caught the first one from Kyle Rowley, and Markee White grabbed the next two, both from four yards out.

Tampa Bay finally answered with 5:49 left in the first half, another rushing score by Ortiz to make the score 20–14.

After Markee White's third receiving touchdown gave the Shock a 27–14 lead, Tampa Bay scored consecutive touchdowns to take a 28–27 lead. But Spokane got the last points of the half. White's fourth touchdown from Rowley made it 34–28. Tampa had a chance to add three points as the first half expired, but Garrett Rivas's field goal was blocked.

Second Half

The Storm took its final lead of the game 35–34 to open the third quarter on Ortiz's third rushing touchdown. But Spokane would score the next three touchdowns. The Shock led 48–35 at the end of the third quarter and expanded it to 55–35 at the beginning of the final quarter.

In the fourth quarter, the Shock just wanted to keep the clock running and force the Storm to play catch up. Both teams traded touchdowns through the entire quarter, and Tampa Bay could not make up the deficit. The Storm got the game's last score with 44 seconds left, making it 69–57, the closest it got all quarter.

Game Notes

Spokane Shock quarterback Kyle Rowley was named the games MVP. He went 24 for 32 with 237 yards. He threw nine touchdown passes without an interception and added another touchdown on the run. The nine touchdowns he threw for set an ArenaBowl record.

Spokane did not have a 100 yard receiver but Markee White caught nine passes for 99 yards and four scores. Huey Whittaker had four touchdown receptions as well to go along with eight catches for 82 yards.

The Shocks' Mervin Brookins and Travis Williams each recorded an interception.

For Tampa Bay, quarterback Brett Dietz threw for 306 yards on 29 of 40 passing. He had four touchdown passes and two interceptions. The Storm's Hank Edwards led the game with 11 catches for 132 yards. He caught two of Dietz's scoring passes. Tyrone Timmons also had eight receptions for 107 yards and a score.

Attendance

The announced attendance for ArenaBowl XXIII was 11,017. The game was a sellout, at 102% capacity given Spokane Arena's 10,771 capacity. However, it was the second lowest attended ArenaBowl in league history, second only to ArenaBowl XIX in 2005. That game between the Georgia Force and Colorado Crush was the AFL's first neutral site ArenaBowl with 10,822 fans at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas, Nevada.

References

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