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Arrows A11

Arrows A11
Arrows A11B
Footwork A11C
Category Formula One
Constructor Arrows
Designer(s) Ross Brawn
James Robinson
Predecessor A10B
Successor FA12
Technical specifications[1]
Chassis Carbon fibre and kevlar monocoque
Engine 1989, 1990: mid-engine, longitudinally mounted, 3,493 cc (213.2 cu in), Ford DFR, 90° V8, NA
1991: mid-engine, longitudinally mounted, 3,499 cc (213.5 cu in), Porsche 3512, 80° V12, NA
Transmission Arrows / Hewland
1989, 1990: 5-speed manual
1991: 6-speed semi-automatic
Fuel 1989 Mobil
1990 Elf
1991 Shell
Tyres Goodyear
Competition history
Notable entrants Arrows Grand Prix International
Footwork Arrows Racing
Notable drivers 9. United Kingdom Derek Warwick
10. United States Eddie Cheever
9. Italy Michele Alboreto
10. Germany Bernd Schneider
10. Italy Alex Caffi
Debut 1989 Brazilian Grand Prix
Races Wins Poles Fastest laps
35 0 0 0
Constructors' Championships 0
Drivers' Championships 0

The Arrows A11 was a Formula One car with which the Arrows team competed in the 1989 and 1990 Formula One seasons, and at the start of the 1991 season (badged as a Footwork).

Designed by Ross Brawn, the A11 was the first Arrows car following the ban on turbocharged engines at the end of 1988, being fitted with a normally-aspirated 3.5-litre Ford Cosworth DFR V8 engine. It was raced to reasonably good effect by Derek Warwick and Eddie Cheever in 1989, Warwick finishing in the top six on five occasions and briefly challenging for victory in the Canadian Grand Prix, and Cheever finishing third in the United States Grand Prix, held in his home town of Phoenix, Arizona. With 13 points, Arrows placed seventh in the Constructors' Championship.

For 1990, the car received minor suspension upgrades and became the A11B, while Italian drivers Michele Alboreto and Alex Caffi replaced Warwick and Cheever. 1990 turned out to be far less successful than 1989, however, as the car failed to qualify seven times, and finished in the top six only once, when Caffi took fifth at an attritional race in Monaco. Caffi was also forced to sit out the United States and Spanish races through injury, Germany's Bernd Schneider deputising on both occasions. The two points from Monaco gave Arrows ninth in the Constructors' Championship.

By the start of 1991, the team had been taken over by the Japanese Footwork concern and renamed accordingly, and had also secured a deal to run Porsche V12 engines, replacing the Fords. However, the team's car for that season, the FA12, had to be redesigned when it was discovered that the large Porsche engine, the 3512, could not fit into it. The team therefore modified the A11B into the A11C to accommodate this engine, and used it in the first two races, as well as at San Marino after Alboreto destroyed his redesigned FA12 during practice.[2] From these five attempts, the ageing car qualified only once (Alboreto in the United States), before being finally retired.


Complete Formula One World Championship results

(key)

Year Team Chassis Engine Tyres Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Points WCC
1989 Arrows A11 Ford DFR V8 G BRA SMR MON MEX USA CAN FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA POR ESP JPN AUS 13 7th
United Kingdom Derek Warwick 5 5 Ret Ret Ret Ret 9 6 10 6 Ret Ret 9 6 Ret
United Kingdom Martin Donnelly 12
United States Eddie Cheever Ret 9 7 7 3 Ret 7 DNQ 12 5 Ret DNQ Ret Ret 8 Ret
1990 Arrows A11B Ford DFR V8 G USA BRA SMR MON CAN MEX FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA POR ESP JPN AUS 2 9th
Italy Michele Alboreto 10 Ret DNQ DNQ Ret 17 10 Ret Ret 12 13 12 9 10 Ret DNQ
Germany Bernd Schneider 12 DNQ
Italy Alex Caffi Ret DNQ 5 8 DNQ Ret 7 9 9 10 9 13 9 DNQ
1991 Footwork A11C Porsche 3512 V12 G USA BRA SMR MON CAN MEX FRA GBR GER HUN BEL ITA POR ESP JPN AUS 0 NC
Italy Alex Caffi DNQ DNQ
Italy Michele Alboreto Ret DNQ DNQ

References

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