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Auto-brewery syndrome

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Title: Auto-brewery syndrome  
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Subject: Fermentation, Ethanol, Internal medicine, Brewing, Fluconazole
Collection: Brewing, Ethanol, Fermentation, Internal Medicine, Rare Diseases
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Auto-brewery syndrome

Auto-brewery syndrome, also known as gut fermentation syndrome, is a rare medical condition in which Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a type of yeast, has been identified as a pathogen for this condition.

Claims of endogenous fermentation of this type have been used as a defense against drunk driving charges.[4][5]

One case went undetected for 20 years.[6]

It has also been investigated, but eliminated, as a possible cause of sudden infant death syndrome.[7]

The antifungal drug fluconazole can be effective treatment for the condition since the drug is capable of killing Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the gastrointestinal tract.[2]

The effects of the disease can have profound effects on everyday life; as well the recurring side effects of dizziness, dry mouth, hangovers, disorientation, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, which can lead to other health problems such as depression and anxiety - the random state of intoxication can lead to personal difficulties and the relative obscurity of the condition can also make it hard to seek treatment. Usually the effects of the condition can be alleviated through a special very low-carbohydrate diet[8]

A variant occurs in persons with liver abnormalities that prevent them from excreting or breaking down alcohol normally. Patients with this condition can develop symptoms of auto-brewery syndrome even when the gut yeast produces a quantity of alcohol that is too small to intoxicate a healthy individual. [9]

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