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Barry Parkhill

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Title: Barry Parkhill  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: ACC Athlete of the Year, Ed Ratleff, Dickie Hemric, 1973 NBA draft, Art Heyman
Collection: 1951 Births, Acc Athlete of the Year, American Basketball Coaches, American Men's Basketball Players, Basketball Players from Pennsylvania, Living People, Navy Midshipmen Men's Basketball Coaches, Portland Trail Blazers Draft Picks, Saint Michael's Purple Knights Men's Basketball Coaches, Shooting Guards, Spirits of St. Louis Players, Sportspeople from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Virginia Cavaliers Men's Basketball Coaches, Virginia Cavaliers Men's Basketball Players, Virginia Squires Players, William & Mary Tribe Men's Basketball Coaches
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Barry Parkhill

Barry Parkhill
No. 40
Shooting guard
Personal information
Born (1951-05-10) May 10, 1951
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Nationality American
Listed height 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Listed weight 185 lb (84 kg)
Career information
High school State College
(State College, Pennsylvania)
College Virginia (1970–1973)
NBA draft 1973 / Round: 1 / Pick: 15th overall
Selected by the Portland Trail Blazers
Pro career 1973–1976
Career history
As player:
1973–1975 Virginia Squires
1975–1976 Spirits of St. Louis
As coach:
1977–1978 Virginia (grad. assistant)
1978–1983 William & Mary (assistant)
1983–1987 William & Mary
1989–1990 Saint Michael's
1990–1992 Navy (assistant)
Career highlights and awards
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Barry Parkhill (born May 11, 1951) is a retired American professional basketball player from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania who was selected by the Portland Trail Blazers in the 1st round (15th overall) of the 1973 NBA Draft but elected to play in the American Basketball Association instead. A 6'4" (1.93 m) guard-forward from the University of Virginia, Parkhill played in three ABA seasons for two different teams. He played for the Virginia Squires and the Spirits of St. Louis.

In 2001, Parkhill was inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame.

Contents

  • Playing career 1
    • High school 1.1
    • College 1.2
    • Professional 1.3
  • Post playing career 2
    • Coaching 2.1
    • Administration 2.2
  • References 3

Playing career

High school

Parkhill attended and played basketball for State College High School in State College, Pennsylvania. He is among the all-time scoring leaders and broke the 1,000 point barrier during his senior year.[1]

College

Parkhill was named the ACC Men's Basketball Player of the Year and the ACC Athlete of the Year for the 1971–72 season when he averaged 21.6 points per game and led the Cavaliers to their second postseason appearance in school history.[2] His number 40 was retired at the end of his senior season. In 2002, Parkhill was named to the ACC 50th Anniversary men's basketball team as one of the fifty greatest players in Atlantic Coast Conference history.

Professional

In his ABA career, Parkhill played in 173 games and scored a total of 970 points. His best year as a professional came during the 1975 season with the Virginia Squires appearing in 78 games and scoring 607 points.

Post playing career

Coaching

Administration

  • 1992–1994 – Associate Director of Regional Development, University of Virginia Office of Development
  • 1995–1998 – Director of Alumni Development, University of Virginia Alumni Association / Director of Capital Projects for Athletics
  • 1999–present – University of Virginia Associate Director of Athletics for Development

References

  1. ^ State College High School Website
  2. ^ TheSabre.com Jun 22, 2006Last Ball in U-Hall: Parkhill Raised UVa's ProfileSean McLernon
  3. ^ Barry Parkhill College Stats TheDraftReview.com 2004
  4. ^ Barry Parkhill Professional Stats Basketball-Reference.com 2004-2006
  5. ^ William & Mary Men's Basketball History
  6. ^ St Michael's College Basketball History
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