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Bathtub

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Title: Bathtub  
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Subject: Shower, Bathing, Paw feet, Bathroom, Tap (valve)
Collection: Babycare, Bathing, Bathrooms, Plumbing
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Bathtub

Private cast iron bathtubs with porcelain interiors on "claw foot" pedestals rose to popularity in the 19th century

A bathtub, bath or tub (informal) is a large container for holding water in which a person may bathe. Most modern bathtubs are made of acrylic or fiberglass, but alternatives are available in enamel on steel or cast iron; occasionally, waterproof finished wood. A bathtub is usually placed in a bathroom either as a stand-alone fixture or in conjunction with a shower.

The average time to empty a baby bath is 4 seconds.

Modern bathtubs have overflow and waste drains and may have taps mounted on them. They are usually built-in, but may be free-standing or sometimes sunken. Until recently, most bathtubs were roughly rectangular in shape but with the advent of acrylic thermoformed baths, more shapes are becoming available. Bathtubs are commonly white in colour although many other colours can be found. The process for enamelling cast iron bathtubs was invented by the Scottish-born American David Dunbar Buick.

Two main styles of bathtub are common:

  • Western style bathtubs in which the bather lies down. These baths are typically shallow and long.
  • Eastern style bathtubs in which the bather sits up. These are known as ofuro in Japan and are typically short and deep.

Contents

  • History of bathtubs and bathing 1
  • Clawfoot tub 2
  • Baby bathtub 3
  • Hot tubs 4
  • Whirlpool tubs 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7

History of bathtubs and bathing

Traditional bathtub (19th century) from Italy

Documented early plumbing systems for bathing go back as far as around 3300 BC with the discovery of copper water pipes beneath a palace in the Indus Valley Civilization of ancient India; see sanitation of the Indus Valley Civilization. Evidence of the earliest surviving personal sized bath tub was found on the Isle of Crete where a 5-foot (1.5 m) long pedestal tub was found built from hardened pottery.

The clawfoot tub, which reached the apex of its popularity in the late 19th century; had its origins in the mid 18th century, where the ball and claw design originated in Holland, possibly artistically inspired by the Chinese motif of a dragon holding a precious stone. The design spread to England where it found much popularity among the aristocracy, just as bathing was becoming increasingly fashionable. Early bathtubs in England tended to be made of cast iron, or even tin and copper with a face of paint applied that tended to peel with time.[1]

The Scottish-born entrepreneur David Buick invented a process for bonding porcelain enamel to cast iron in the 1880s while working for the Alexander Manufacturing Company in Detroit. The company, as well as others including Kohler Company and J. L. Mott Iron Works, began successfully marketing porcelain enameled cast-iron bathtubs, a process that remains broadly the same to this day. Far from the ornate feet and luxury most associated with clawfoot tubs, an early Kohler example was advertised as a "horse trough/hog scalder, when furnished with four legs will serve as a bathtub." The item's use as hog scalder was considered a more important marketing point than its ability to function as a bathtub.[1]

In the latter half of the 20th century, the once popular clawfoot tub morphed into a built-in tub with a small apron front. This enclosed style afforded easier maintenance and, with the emergence of colored sanitary ware, more design options for the homeowner. The Crane Company introduced colored bathroom fixtures to the US market in 1928, and slowly this influx of design options and easier cleaning and care led to the near demise of clawfoot-style tubs.

Clawfoot tub

Slipper tub

The clawfoot tub or claw-foot tub was considered a luxury item in the late 19th century,[2] originally made from cast iron and lined with porcelain. Modern technology has contributed to a drop in the price of clawfoot tubs, which may now be made of fiberglass, acrylic or other modern materials. Clawfoot tubs usually require more water than a standard bathtub, because generally they are larger. While true antique clawfoot tubs are still considered collectible items, new reproduction clawfoot tubs are chosen by remodellers and new home builders[3] and much like the Western-style bathtubs, clawfoot tubs can also sometimes include shower heads.[4]

Clawfoot tubs come in 5 major styles:

  • Classic Roll Rim, Roll Top, or Flat Rim tubs as seen in the picture above.
  • Slipper tubs - where one end is raised and sloped creating a more comfortable lounging position.
  • Double Slipper Tubs - where both ends are raised and sloped.
  • Double Ended Tubs - where both ends of the tub are rounded. Notice how one end of the classic tub is rounded and one is fairly flat.
  • Pedestal Tub - Pedestal tubs, unlike all the styles listed above, do not have claw feet. The tub rests on a pedestal in what most would term an art deco style. Evidence of pedestal tubs dates back to the Isle of Crete in 1000 BC.

Baby bathtub

Wooden bathtubs for children and infants in Haikou, Hainan, China

A baby bathtub is one used for bathing infants, especially those not yet old enough to sit up on their own. These can be either a small, stand-alone bath that is filled with water from another source, or a device for supporting the baby that is placed in a standard bathtub. Many are designed to allow the baby to recline while keeping its head out of the water.

Hot tubs

Hot tubs are common heated pools used for relaxation and sometimes for therapy. The "hippie" era (1967–1980) popularized them in America in songs and movies.

Whirlpool tubs

Jacuzzi whirlpool bathtub

Whirlpool tubs first became popular in America during the 1960s and 70s. A spa or hot tub is also called a "jacuzzi" since the word became a generic after plumbing component manufacturer Jacuzzi introduced the "Spa Whirlpool" in 1968. Air bubbles may be introduced into the nozzles via an air-bleed venturi pump.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Footed In Style: The “Clawfoot” Tub". 
  2. ^ "Quick and Easy Guide to Clawfoot Bathtubs". Retrieved 2015-09-20. 
  3. ^ "5 Points to Ponder When Choosing a Clawfoot Tub". 
  4. ^ "A Clawfoot Tub With a Shower". 
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