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Bhumi Devi

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Bhumi Devi

Bhumi
Template:Larger
Metal Sculpture of Goddess Bhudevi
Affiliation Devi
Consort Sri Maha Vishnu, Varaha

Bhūmi (Sanskrit: भूमि), also Bhūmī-Devī (Sanskrit: भूमी देवी), or Bhū-Devī, is the personification of Mother Earth. She is also the divine wife of Varaha, an Avatar of Vishnu, the mother of Sita (note the symbolism of the baby Sita being found in a ploughed field). According to the uttara-kanda, when Sita finally leaves her husband Rama, she returns to Bhumidevi. She is the mother of the demon Narakasura .[1] Bhumi Devi is also believed to be one of the two forms of Lakshmi. The other is Sridevi, who remains with Narayana. Bhudevi is the Goddess of Earth, and the fertility form of Lakshmi. She is the daughter of Kashyap Prajapati and known as kasyapi. According to some she is also Satyabhama, wife of Sri Krishna in Dwapara Yuga and the divine saint Andal. Several female deities have had births similar to Sita. Alamelu Mangamma or Sri Padmavathi Devi of Tiruchanur had a similar beginning, being found in a ploughed field by Akasa Raja. Andal from Srivilliputtur in Tamilnadu was found under a Tulasi plant by Periyaalvar.

Iconography

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She is depicted in votive statuary, seated on a square platform which rests on the back of four elephants representing the four directions of the world. When depicted with four arms, she holds a pomegranate, a water vessel, a bowl containing healing herbs, and another containing vegetables.[2] When shown with two arms, she holds a blue lotus known as Komud or Uttpal the night lotus, in the right hand.[3] The left hand may be in the Abhaya Mudra - fearlessness or the Lolahasta Mudra which is an aesthetic pose meant to mimic the tail of a cow.[4]

Festivals

References


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