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Bike lane

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Title: Bike lane  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Bicycle culture, Cycling, Transport infrastructure, Bicycle transportation planning and engineering, Cycling infrastructure
Collection: Cycling, Cycling Infrastructure, Transport Infrastructure
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Bike lane

Cycle lanes (UK) or bike lanes (USA) are types of bikeways (Cycleways) with lanes on the roadway for cyclists only. In the UK, an on-road cycle-lane can be restricted [to cycles] (marked with a solid white line, entry by motor vehicles is prohibited) or advisory (marked with a broken white line, entry by motor vehicles is permitted). In the U.S., a designated bicycle lane (1988 MUTCD) or class II bikeway (Caltrans) is always marked by a solid white stripe on the pavement and is for 'preferential use' by bicyclists. There is also a class III bicycle route, which has roadside signs suggesting a route for cyclists, and urging sharing the road.

In France, segregated cycling facilities on the carriageway are called bande cyclable, those beside the carriageway or totally independent ones piste cyclable, all together voie cyclable.[1] In Belgium, traffic laws do not distinguish cycle lanes from cyclepaths. Cycle lanes are marked by two parallel broken white lines, and they are defined as being "not wide enough to allow use by motor vehicles". Note that there is some confusion possible here: both in French (piste cyclable) and in Dutch (fietspad) the term for these lanes can also denote a segregated cycle track, marked by a road sign; the cycle lane is therefore often referred to as a "piste cyclable marquée" (in French) or a "gemarkeerd fietspad" (in Dutch), i.e. a cycle lane/track which is "marked" (i.e. identified by road markings) rather than one which is identified by a road sign. In the Netherlands, however, such confusion does not exist, as the cycle lane is normally called "fietsstrook" instead of "fietspad".

See also

References

  1. ^ Pistes et bandes cyclables, FUBiFrench bicycle assiciation
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