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Bishopwearmouth Cemetery

 

Bishopwearmouth Cemetery

Bishopwearmouth Cemetery
Commonwealth war graves in Bishopwearmouth Cemetery
Details
Year established 1856
Location Sunderland
Country United Kingdom
Coordinates
Type Public
Owned by Sunderland City Council
Size 80 acres (320,000 m2)
Find a Grave [1]

Bishopwearmouth Cemetery is a cemetery in Sunderland, Tyne and Wear, England. It lies between Hylton Road and Chester Road (A183 road).

Contents

  • History 1
    • Jewish burials 1.1
    • War Graves 1.2
  • Listed buildings 2
  • Notable burials 3
  • References 4

History

Due to the cholera epidemic of 1831 and the subsequent overcrowding of churchyards, it was decided to build new cemeteries in Sunderland after the passing of the Burial Act 1852 and 1853. [1] The 34 acres (140,000 m2) chosen for Bishopwearmouth Cemetery lay on the edge of the county and parliamentary boundary of Sunderland and was glebe land, owned by the Parish of Bishopwearmouth.[1][2] The land was sold by the parish for £275 (£17,839.73 in 2007) per acre and the cemetery cost £2000 (£129,743.47 in 2007) to build.[1][3] It opened in July 1856, on the same day as another new cemetery, Mere Knolls Cemetery, situated in Fulwell.[1] All religious denominations were alloted separate areas and it soon became the town's main burial site.[1] In 1891, the cemetery was extended further west and further extended in 1926. The whole site now covers 80 acres (320,000 m2).[1]

Jewish burials

Sunderland once had a thriving Jewish population.[4] In 1856, the only Jewish cemetery, at Ayres Quay in Bishopwearmouth, closed.[5] A site at the new Bishopwearmouth Cemetery for Jewish burials was then dedicated in the north east corner of the cemetery (the first cemetery in County Durham to do so), adjacent to the Roman Catholic section.[2][6][7] On the cemetery's expansion in 1926, another section was dedicated at the new western edge and on the cemetery's final expansion in 1926, the new north-west section was dedicated and a Jewish temple was built; this section is currently fenced-off from the other wards of the cemetery.[7]

War Graves

In the First World War, part of Ward 3 (Section A) of the cemetery was set apart for burials of servicemen. This plot, at a central point on the path linking the cemetery's two entrances, was extended in the Second World War. In all, 237 Commonwealth service personnel (all but about 100 of whom were buried in the plot) from the First World War and 156 from the Second are buried in this cemetery. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission are also responsible for 31 non-World War service burials and one Dutch war grave.[8]

Listed buildings

There are nine listed buildings within Bishopwearmouth Cemetery; all are Grade II. These are:

  • The gates, piers and railings at the north entrance of the east side of the cemetery.[9]
  • The gates, piers and railings at the south entrance of the east side of the cemetery.[10]
  • The north (Roman Catholic) chapel.[11]
  • The south (Anglican) chapel (vandalised)[12]
  • The south east lodge.[13]
  • The tomb of Christopher Maling Webster (1813–1890) and his family.[14]
  • The tomb of John Bolam (1815–1885) and his family.[15]
  • The tomb of Margaret Taylor (1849–1911), wife of Henneson Taylor.[16]
  • The tomb of members of the Vaux family.[17]

The central (Nonconformist) chapel was formerly a listed building until it was demolished due to vandalism.[18] The memorial to the Victoria Hall disaster, formerly situated in the cemetery and now in Mowbray Park, is also a listed building.[19]

Notable burials

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Chequered 150-year history of Wearside resting places".  
  2. ^ a b "Old Maps". old-maps.co.uk. Retrieved 2008-08-06. 
  3. ^ "Purchasing Power of British Pounds from 1264 to 2007". MeasuringWorth. Retrieved 2008-08-06. 
  4. ^ "Once growing, now fading".  
  5. ^ "Sunderland - A Litvak Community in North East England". Jon Seligman. Retrieved 2008-08-06. 
  6. ^ "Sunderland Burials Available at Durham Records Online". Durham Records Online. Retrieved 2008-08-06. 
  7. ^ a b "Cemetery Project". International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies. Retrieved 2008-08-06. 
  8. ^ [2] CWGC Cemetery Report.
  9. ^ "North Entrance Including Gates, Piers and Railings to Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Sunderland". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 2013-05-05. 
  10. ^ "South Entrance Including Gates, Piers and Railings to Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Sunderland". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 2013-05-05. 
  11. ^ "North Chapel Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Sunderland". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 2013-05-05. 
  12. ^ "South Chapel Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Sunderland". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 2013-05-05. 
  13. ^ "South East Lodge Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Sunderland". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 2013-05-05. 
  14. ^ "Webster Tomb 210 Metres West of South East Lodge Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Sunderland". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 2012-05-05. 
  15. ^ "Bolam Tomb 200 Metres West of South East Lodge at Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Sunderland". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 2013-05-05. 
  16. ^ "Taylor Tomb 210 Metres West of South East Lodge at Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Sunderland". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 2013-05-05. 
  17. ^ "Vaux Tomb 196 Metres West of South East Lodge at Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Sunderland". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 2013-05-05. 
  18. ^ "Central Chapel Bishopwearmouth Cemetery, Sunderland". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 2013-05-05. 
  19. ^ "Listed Buildings - Number: 920-1/4/39 - Description". Sunderland City Council. Retrieved 2008-08-07. 
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