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Boat shoe

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Title: Boat shoe  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Footwear, Shoe, List of shoe styles, Driving moccasins, Peep-toe shoe
Collection: History of Fashion, Shoes
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Boat shoe

Boat shoes are worn by both women and men.

Boat shoes (also known as deck shoes or topsiders) are typically canvas or leather with non-marking rubber soles designed for use on a boat. A siping pattern is cut into the soles to provide grip on a wet deck; the leather construction, along with application of oil, is designed to repel water; and the stitching is highly durable. Boat shoes are traditionally worn without socks.[1]

Modern boat shoes were invented in 1935 by Paul Sperry after noticing his dog's ability to run easily over ice without slipping. Using a knife, he cut siping into his shoes' soles, inspiring a shoe perfect for boating and a company called Sperry Top-Sider. Sperry Top-Siders are still a popular brand of boat shoe today, among many others, including Sebago and Timberland.

Sebago Docksiders.

Boat shoes are used by sailors, as the name suggests; however, since the 1980s they have become fashionable footwear in North America, Argentina, China, France, Portugal, Spain, Italy and the UK. Some boat shoes today have traditional white, non-marking soles, though many others today have dark non-marking soles. They usually have a moc-toe (like a moccasin) construction.

References

  1. ^ "When to Break Out the Boat Shoes: Ask Nick Sullivan".  
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