World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Bobby Wallace (baseball)

Article Id: WHEBN0000841734
Reproduction Date:

Title: Bobby Wallace (baseball)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Rogers Hornsby, List of Baltimore Orioles managers, Veterans Committee, Jimmy McAleer, Rabbit Maranville
Collection: 1873 Births, 1960 Deaths, 19Th-Century Baseball Players, Baseball Players from Pennsylvania, Burials at Inglewood Park Cemetery, Cincinnati Reds Coaches, Cincinnati Reds Managers, Cincinnati Reds Scouts, Cleveland Spiders Players, Major League Baseball Pitchers, Major League Baseball Player-Managers, Major League Baseball Shortstops, Major League Baseball Third Basemen, Minor League Baseball Managers, Muskogee Mets Players, National Baseball Hall of Fame Inductees, Sportspeople from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, St. Louis Browns Managers, St. Louis Browns Players, St. Louis Cardinals Players, St. Louis Perfectos Players, Wichita Witches Players
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Bobby Wallace (baseball)

Bobby Wallace
Shortstop / Pitcher / Manager / Umpire
Born: (1873-11-04)November 4, 1873
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Died: November 3, 1960(1960-11-03) (aged 86)
Torrance, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 15, 1894, for the Cleveland Spiders
Last MLB appearance
September 2, 1918, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Batting average .268
Hits 2,309
Runs batted in 1,121
Teams

As Player

As Manager

Member of the National
Baseball Hall of Fame
Inducted 1953
Election Method Veteran's Committee

Roderick John "Bobby" Wallace (November 4, 1873 – November 3, 1960) was a Major League Baseball infielder, pitcher, manager, umpire, and scout.

Contents

  • Career 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Career

Wallace was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He made his major league debut in 1894 as a starting pitcher with the Cleveland Spiders. After a 12–14 record in 1895, Wallace played outfield and pitcher in 1896. In 1897, Wallace was an everyday player as he became the team's full-time third baseman, batted .335 and drove in 112 runs.

In 1899, Wallace moved to the St. Louis Perfectos (renamed the Cardinals in 1900) and changed position to shortstop. He hit .295 with 108 RBI and 12 home runs (second in the league behind Buck Freeman's 25). Wallace changed teams again in 1902, when he joined the St. Louis Browns.

His playing time began decreasing a decade later, with his last season as a regular coming in 1912. Wallace played in just 55 games in 1913, and never played that much again for the rest of his career. In July 1917, he returned to the National League and the Cardinals, and played in just eight games that season. After batting .153 in 32 games in 1918, Wallace retired with a .268 career batting average, 1059 runs, 34 home runs, 1121 RBI and 201 stolen bases. He played his last game on September 2, 1918 at the age of 44 years and 312 days, making him the oldest shortstop to play in a regular-season game.[1] The record was broken by Omar Vizquel on May 7, 2012.

Wallace was generally recognized as the AL's best shortstop from 1902 to 1911, when he served briefly as Browns player-manager.

He played for 24 seasons, and holds the record for the longest career by a player who never played in a World Series.

When his playing time diminished, Wallace managed and umpired. He managed the St. Louis Browns in 1911 and 1912 and the Cincinnati Reds during part of the 1937 season. He compiled 62 wins and 154 losses for a .287 winning percentage as a major league manager. He also managed the minor league Wichita Witches in 1917. He umpired in the American League in 1915, working 111 games. Upon retiring, he also became a scout.

Wallace was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1953.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Omar Vizquel turns 45 with a chance to become the all-time elder statesman among shortstops". Yahoo! Sports. Retrieved 24 April 2012. 

External links

  • Bobby Wallace at the Baseball Hall of Fame
  • Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube, or Baseball-Reference (Minors)
  • Retrosheet.org
  • The Deadball Era
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.