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Bolt cutter

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Bolt cutter

Bolt cutters

A bolt cutter, sometimes called bolt cropper, is a tool used for cutting chains, padlocks, bolts and wire mesh. The original use for bolt cutters was, as the name suggests, to cut bolt seals from shipping containers at the delivery point. It typically has long handles and short blades, with compound hinges to maximize leverage and cutting force. A typical bolt cutter yields 20 kilonewtons (4,500 lbf) of cutting force for a 250 newtons (56 lbf) force on the handles.

There are different types of cutting blades for bolt cutters, including angle cut, center cut, shear cut, and clipper cut blades. Bolt cutters are available usually in 12, 14, 18, 24, 30, 36 and 42 inches (30.5, 35.6, 46, 61, 76, 91.4 and 107 cm) in length. The length is measured from the tip of the jaw to the end of the handle.

  • Angle cut has the cutter head angled for easier insertion. Typical angling is 25 to 35 degrees.
  • Center cut has the blades equidistant from the two faces of the blade.
  • Shear cut has the blades inverted to each other (such as normal paper scissor blades).
  • Clipper cut has the blades flush against one face (for cutting against flat surfaces).

Bolt cutters with drop forged or solid pipe handles.

This tool has been used in vandalism.

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