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Boulder

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Title: Boulder  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Grain size, Gnip, Cobble (geology), 2008, Astronomy/Picture/Week 29 2009
Collection: Garden Features, Natural Materials, Rock Formations, Rocks
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Boulder

This balancing boulder, "Balanced Rock" stands in Garden of the Gods park in Colorado Springs, Colorado, United States.

In geology, a boulder is a rock with grain size of usually no less than 30 centimetres (1 ft) diameter.[1] [2] While a boulder may be small enough to move or roll manually, others are extremely massive.[3] In common usage, a boulder is too large for a person to move. Smaller boulders are usually just called rocks or stones. The word boulder is short for boulder stone, from Middle English bulderston or Swedish bullersten.[4]

In places covered by ice sheets during Ice Ages, such as Scandinavia, northern North America, and Russia, glacial erratics are common. Erratics are boulders picked up by the ice sheet during its advance, and deposited during its retreat.[5] They are called "erratic" because they typically are of a different rock type than the bedrock on which they are deposited. One of them is used as the pedestal of the Bronze Horseman in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

Some noted rock formations involve giant boulders exposed by erosion, such as the Devil's Marbles in Australia's Northern Territory, the Horeke basalts in New Zealand, where an entire valley contains only boulders, and The Baths on the island of Virgin Gorda in the British Virgin Islands.

The climbing of large boulders is called bouldering.

See also

References

  1. ^ "ASTM D2487-11,". American Society for Testing and Materials, 2011. 
  2. ^ "A Basic Sedimentary Rock Classification", "James Madison University", 5 May 2013
  3. ^ "Boulder". Dictionary.com. Retrieved 24 August 2013. 
  4. ^ boulder. (n.d.) Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved December 9, 2011, from Dictionary.com website.
  5. ^ "Boulder". Dictionary.com. Retrieved 24 August 2013. 
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